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  • Is Kratom a Substitute for Opiates or a Tool For Getting Clean?

    Is Kratom a Substitute for Opiates or a Tool For Getting Clean?

    Opiate abuse is one of the fastest growing and most deadly diseases currently facing the United States. Each year, thousands of people overdose on heroin or prescription opiates, and despite the best efforts of law enforcement and public health officials, opiate addiction continues to be on the steady incline.

  • Recognizing the Signs of Active Alcoholism

    Recognizing the Signs of Active Alcoholism

    Alcoholism is a disease that strikes people of all ages and from all walks of life. Like all addictions, alcohol often leads the person who is suffering from alcoholism to deliberately conceal their alcohol abuse from others. Many loved ones may also not be entirely aware of what constitutes alcoholism, and whether their loved one is truly suffering from alcohol addiction.

  • How valuable is Methadone Treatment to Opioid Addicts?

    How valuable is Methadone Treatment to Opioid Addicts?

    Prescription drug abuse, of opioid painkillers especially, is a very fast rising form of drug addiction, claiming more lives then any other form of preventable death. Even when these prescriptions are not deliberately misused, they can easily become addictive, and often have a long and painful withdraw process.

  • What is Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs Aim to Prevent

    What is Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs Aim to Prevent

    In an effort to identify instances of prescription drug abuse and reduce the cases of addiction, prescription drug monitoring programs are sharing prescription records with doctors and pharmacists in other states. A prescription drug monitoring program is a statewide electronic database which collects designated data on prescribed substances that are dispensed within the state.

  • Veterans with PTSD More Likely to Be Prescribed Painkillers

    Veterans with PTSD More Likely to Be Prescribed Painkillers

    The men and women who serve in the military may return home as heroes but they are often dealing with a myriad of problems after completing their service. Veterans often must cope with severe pain because of combat-related injuries and mental health problems such as PTSD or post-traumatic stress disorder.

  • Practicing Tough Love with an Alcoholic

    Practicing Tough Love with an Alcoholic

    Seeing someone you really care about in the middle of something as intensely all consuming and harmful as an alcohol addiction can sometimes be excruciatingly painful. A life built around nothing but drinking can brings a lot of harm with it.

  • State of New York Publishes Site to help Struggling Opioid Addicts

    State of New York Publishes Site to help Struggling Opioid Addicts

    The misuse and addiction of opioid painkillers is one of the most rapidly growing and serious drug addiction epidemics to plague the United States. The state of New York, which has the country's third highest population, has not been immune to the problems associated with this ongoing and growing drug problem.

  • The Mental Aspect of Getting Clean and Sober

    The Mental Aspect of Getting Clean and Sober

    Getting sober is an act of total mental transformation. When you are actively using drugs and alcohol, it is easy for your brain to become accustomed to thinking in terms of using and maintaining a constant desire to keep finding and consuming drugs or alcohol.

  • Dealing with Alcohol in the House as an Alcoholic

    Dealing with Alcohol in the House as an Alcoholic

    Once an alcohol leaves their rehab program, they still face many challenges in maintaining their sobriety and continue to struggle to live their alcohol and drug-free lifestyle. If you are an alcoholic and you are moving back home with your family then you will have to take some time discuss the changes you have made with everyone in the household.

  • Benzodiazepine Etizolam Creating a Buzz Amongst Teens

    Benzodiazepine Etizolam Creating a Buzz Amongst Teens

    A new legal research drug known as Etizolam has become a target for the DEA due to its increasing abuse among teens in the U.S. Although the benzodiazepine analog can be dangerous it is currently legal to sell because of the way it is manufactured.

  • Liam Neeson Speaks about His Sobriety While Working on New Movie

    Liam Neeson Speaks about His Sobriety While Working on New Movie

    Newly sober actor Liam Neeson has opened up recently about his decision to quit drinking and the positive effect it has already had on his life. The action star is currently working on his new movie, "Taken 2" the sequel to the popular film that breathed new life into his career.

  • Take a Look at the Psychological Effects of Your Drinking

    Take a Look at the Psychological Effects of Your Drinking

    Alcoholism would not exist unless alcohol produced some "good feelings," or states of being that may seem fun, desirable, or a numbing of unresolved pain. However, a closer look at the psychological effects of drinking paint a much more complex and potentially dangerous picture.

  • Xenoport and NIAAA Collaborating on Alcoholism Treatment

    Xenoport and NIAAA Collaborating on Alcoholism Treatment

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse is working in cooperation with the pharmaceutical company Xenoport on a collaborative study that will examine the effectiveness of extended release tablets designed to treat individuals who are addicted to alcohol. This is one of many recent clinical studies that are examining whether certain drugs may be an effective means of helping alcoholics to deal with some of the physiological effects of withdrawing from alcohol.

  • Understanding What Hallucinogens Do to the Brain

    Understanding What Hallucinogens Do to the Brain

    Hallucinogenic drugs like LSD create an immediate effect on the brain and when used frequently enough can also cause long term problems. Hallucinogens work by altering a person's perception of reality at times causing hallucinations or other alterations of the senses.

  • 5 Reasons High Functioning Alcoholics still Find Their Bottom Eventually

    5 Reasons High Functioning Alcoholics still Find Their Bottom Eventually

    There is a stereotype of "alcoholics" that is often untrue and unhelpful, of violent and impoverished people who spend all of their days too drunk to function. The truth is that there are many people, called high functioning alcoholics, with out of control drinking who are nevertheless able to maintain a presentable face to the world, having a life that, to an outsider, looks good.

  • Ultra Potent New Research Chemical Benzo Flubromazepam

    Ultra Potent New Research Chemical Benzo Flubromazepam

    Benzodiazepines are a type of tranquilizer drug that is available as prescription medication but also in the form of research chemicals for experimentation and study. A new benzodiazepine derivative known as Flubromazepam has entered the market recently and is being sold in internet shops as a research chemical.

  • NFL Revises Drug Use Policy

    NFL Revises Drug Use Policy

    Athletes' careers depend on taking care of their bodies, so that they continue to perform well. Yet sometimes, professional players can get so confident in their own abilities and invincibility that they engage in reckless decisions to engage in substance abuse.

  • Why Alcoholism and Anorexia are Common in Young Adults

    Why Alcoholism and Anorexia are Common in Young Adults

    Anorexia is an eating disorder characterized by tight control over eating, to the point of avoiding food and an obsession with weight. Alcoholism is characterized by an out-of-control consumption of alcoholic beverages, drinking to the point of getting drunk compulsively.

  • Swedish Dance Club Goes Dry for a Night

    Swedish Dance Club Goes Dry for a Night

    Some people may be aware of how their drinking may be causing problems, for their health and their behavior, but are afraid of the process of recovery, thinking that sobriety will take them out of social settings where they have fun. Other people would not normally be interested in drinking to excess, but may consider it a requirement to be a part of social circles they are attracted to, that involve late night music and dancing.

  • What to Worry About When Detoxing from Alcohol

    What to Worry About When Detoxing from Alcohol

    Entering a treatment center and undergoing the process of detox for the first time can be an intimidating experience, especially if you don't know what to expect. It can help you feel more prepared for the first phase of recovery if you have a better idea of what your body will be going through and the best ways to handle certain situations that can come up.

  • Amanda Bynes Arrested for Suspicion of DUI

    Amanda Bynes Arrested for Suspicion of DUI

    Child actor Amanda Bynes has run into legal trouble yet again after she was arrested on suspicion of a DUI in Sherman Oaks, CA. The young starlet was taken into custody after police arrested her for not being able to pass a field sobriety test.

  • Denial Plays A Substantial Role in Alcoholism

    Denial Plays A Substantial Role in Alcoholism

    Alcoholism is a dangerous and often terrifying disease for a number of reasons, not least of which is the fact that when a person is addicted to alcohol, they often engage in highly risky behaviors, often blacking out and feeling extremely powerless while drinking.

  • Why is the U.S. 80% of the Worlds Prescription Drug Consumption?

    Why is the U.S. 80% of the Worlds Prescription Drug Consumption?

    Current estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau place U.S. population at around 319 million people, or slightly more then 4 percent of the people on earth. Thus, it is astounding that, according to congregational testimony by the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians, this one nation results in 80 percent of the consumption of prescription pain killers in the world.

  • Approaching a Person in Active Alcoholism

    Approaching a Person in Active Alcoholism

    When someone close to you is suffering from an addiction, it is never easy to confront them about their behavior and ask them to seek help. For family members and close friends, seeing someone in their life struggle with alcoholism is painful but they may not know what to do to stop it.

  • What You Need To Know About Methadone Maintenance

    What You Need To Know About Methadone Maintenance

    If you have been considering methadone treatment, or if you are an addict who is ready to seek help for your addiction to heroin or opiates, there are a few things you should know about methadone and a methadone maintenance program. Methadone maintenance can be a highly effective way of recovering from addiction, but there are risks inherent to methadone use that you should be aware of before you begin treatment.

  • 5 Ways Treatment Changes Your Perspective

    5 Ways Treatment Changes Your Perspective

    Recovering from drug and alcohol addiction is an incredibly transformative experience that changes virtually everything about the way an addict perceives and experiences the world. When a person is addicted to drugs or alcohol, they very frequently find that their priorities shift so that they are entirely consumed with using.

  • Does a Drug Taper Off Help before Detox?

    Does a Drug Taper Off Help before Detox?

    When an addict is ready to stop using drugs, one of the first things they must do is to detox. During detox, an addict, under the support of a medical staff, completely stops using and allows the dangerous drugs to leave their system. 

  • Dealing with Spousal Alcoholism and Addiction

    Dealing with Spousal Alcoholism and Addiction

    People struggling with addiction are not only harming their own bodies and minds, but they are also hurt the people around them and their relationships. Marriage is one relationship that can be especially strained through the pain of addiction, turning a happy home into a nightmare.

  • How to Stay Sober at Music Festivals

    How to Stay Sober at Music Festivals

    Music festivals can be very joyous and fun occasions, providing the opportunity to hear favorite bands and experience community in a new, exciting atmosphere. However, often these festivals are not only about the music itself, but also places for high levels of alcohol and drug use.

  • 5 Tools to Help Keep You Sober

    5 Tools to Help Keep You Sober

    Even after long periods of abstaining from our addictions, staying sober can be a challenge, and there may be periods where it feels like a difficult struggle. However, the truth is that it does not have to be a daily hardship, or feel like more then you can bear.

  • Prevent Substance Abuse by Understanding Drug Slang

    Prevent Substance Abuse by Understanding Drug Slang

    The central way to prevent drug abuse is with responsible education. By cultivating an awareness of what drugs are and the harm they can cause, you can work to prevent what may at first seem like harmless experimentation, but will lead to dangerous, compulsive addiction.

  • Surgery and Pain Medication Use in Recovery

    Surgery and Pain Medication Use in Recovery

    Opioid pain relievers have a very high potential for abuse, and can be very dangerous if taken beyond recommended doses, or for purposes other then their intended use. However, they can also be extremely useful in controlling otherwise unbearable pain, and allowing someone with chronic pain or recovering from extensive surgery to function

  • Painkiller Opana Quickly Rising In Use Around The Nation

    Painkiller Opana Quickly Rising In Use Around The Nation

    Prescription drug use has, for the past several years, been the nation's fastest growing and most dangerous drug epidemic. As deaths and hospitalizations continue to be on the rise in almost every state, legislatures and hospitals are working together to try to find ways to reduce the number of addictions and overdoses due to these dangerous drugs.

  • 5 Tips on Rebuilding Self-Esteem in Recovery

    5 Tips on Rebuilding Self-Esteem in Recovery

    Recovering from an addiction is a long emotional journey that can require a lot of personal growth to get back on track. Addicts most often suffer from issues of low self-esteem because their substance abuse has taken its toll on them psychologically.

  •  Let Your Actions In Sobriety Speak For Themselves

    Let Your Actions In Sobriety Speak For Themselves

    For a recovering addict, becoming sober means finding a whole new outlook on life and behaving completely differently than one did while they were struggling with addiction. This is why sobriety is a lifelong journey and not simply a quick fix.

  • Do Dry Drunks Suffer More In or Out of Recovery

    Do Dry Drunks Suffer More In or Out of Recovery

    There are numerous different aspects of recovering from an addiction and quitting the substance abuse itself is only the first step. Some people in recovery might focus solely on their abstinence but fail to make progress in other areas of their life that also contribute to their disease.

The Truth About Crack Cocaine

History of Crack Cocaine

In 1997 the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, via NIDA, estimated that there were 604,000 crack cocaine users in the United States.

Powdered cocaine is cooked into a more concentrated version, referred to as a rock, that is then smoked as crack cocaine. While the smokable form of cocaine emerged in the mid-1970s, full use of the drug did not reach dangerous, and epidemic, levels until the early-1980s.

In 1981, a large shipment of cocaine made its way from Colombia to the Bahamas and then onto the United States. Instead of selling the powder cocaine as it was, dealers decided to cook it into rocks that could be sold in smaller doses for just $2.50 a hit. This price for crack cocaine was an  80% reduction from the going rate of powdered cocaine in the U.S.

According to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the first crack cocaine labs existed all over Southern Florida, and the drug’s use then rapidly spread across the country. Crack cocaine use was prevalent in clubs, freebase parlors, crack houses, and via curbside distribution in cities and towns nationwide. In New York City, young, white, male professionals were abusing crack cocaine along with middle-class teenagers and young adults in New Jersey, Long Island, and Westchester County.

With a low price and a quick high, crack cocaine use was gaining in popularity.

In 1986, crack cocaine use had reached epidemic proportions. People of every race, ethnic background, age, gender, and socioeconomic status were abusing this dangerous drug. In the early-1990s, crack cocaine was linked to the spread of HIV and AIDs, gang violence, crime, and alarming rates of addiction.

In 1997 the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s (NIDA) National Household Survey on Drug Abuse estimated that there were 604,000 crack cocaine users in the United States. Since the drug is so highly addictive, these users are the ones who progressed to abuse of and addiction to crack cocaine.

In 2004, 50% of all women who were being treated for crack cocaine addiction were 35 years of age and older, and 42% had been using the drug for more than 10 years. Further, 72% of all people seeking treatment for cocaine abuse or addiction used the drug’s crack version as opposed to the drug in its powder form.

If you, or someone you love, is smoking crack cocaine, call Recovery Now TV at 800-281-4731. Change is possible with the right help!

Crack Cocaine and the Brain

Crack tastes like more, that’s all I can say. You take one hit, it’s not enough, and a thousand is not enough.
- Disclosure of a 32-year-old crack cocaine addict.

Neurobiology is the study of the human nervous system. Neurobiologists seek to discover how cells organize into functional circuits within the brain to control behavior and to process information. Scientists throughout the last several decades have worked to understand how drugs affect this circuit.

Crack cocaine has been found to be active on the brain’s limbic system that regulates pleasure and motivation. When first used, cocaine stimulates a release of dopamine, a naturally-occurring neurotransmitter responsible for motivation, reward, arousal, cognition, and motor control. A quick buildup of dopamine, without a real need for it, creates a sense of euphoria, or a pleasurable high, in its users. The positive effect also breeds an intense craving for more cocaine.

Whether smoked, snorted, or injected, crack cocaine quickly enters the bloodstream and is taken right to the brain, flooding the system with dopamine and affecting the three main parts of the limbic system: the nucleus accumbens, important memory centers (the hippocampus and the amygdala), and the frontal cortex.

Neurobiologists have found that this process is operated by a set of switches, so to speak. The “on” switch wants more of something when pleasure is experienced, and the “off” switch alerts the brain of satiation, or enough of whatever flipped the “on” switch. Repeated use of crack cocaine alters the natural functioning of these two switches. The “on” switch becomes overactive, constantly signaling the desire for more crack cocaine, and eventually overpowering the “off” switch. When the message is more, over and over, without a followup message that enough has been used, crack cocaine use progresses to abuse, and onto addiction.

This 32-year-old recovering crack cocaine addict shows the behavioral choices resulting from an impairment of the brain’s “on” and “off” switches:

Crack tastes like more, that’s all I can say. You take one hit, it’s not enough, and a thousand is not enough. You just want to keep going on and on because it’s like a 10-second head rush right after you let the smoke out and you don’t get that effect again unless you take another hit.

The feeling of euphoria felt while smoking crack cocaine ends quickly and is replaced with depression, paranoia, harsh mood swings, and anxiety. The brain’s chemistry cannot automatically resume control after the effects of crack cocaine have altered the way circuits communicate, and when the “on” and “off” shifts have been hijacked for an extended period of time.

While the cycle of crack cocaine addiction is difficult to break, there is treatment for every stage of the drug’s abuse. By calling Recovery Now TV at 800-281-4731, you can find the set of programs that is right for you, or for someone in your life. Call today!

Statistics on Crack Cocaine Use

9% of all teenagers in the United States have used crack cocaine at least once.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), each year in the United States, nearly 6 million people use crack cocaine. The DEA reports that 40-50% of the world’s crack cocaine consumption takes place in North America and in 2004, people within U.S. borders spent over $36 billion on the drug.

Crack Cocaine Occasional Use Versus Addiction Rates

While the total number of actual crack cocaine abusers and addicts is difficult to establish, the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA) estimates that, in 2004, there were 445,000 hardcore users and 2,155,000 occasional crack cocaine users in the United States.

The Drug Use Forecasting (DUF) program, however, suggests that there are 3,103,000 hardcore crack cocaine users in the U.S. The DUF creates its statistic by compiling data from surveys of men and women as they are arrested in various city jails. Questions are asked and a urinalysis drug screen is administered as part of the study.

Cost of Crack Cocaine

The retail cost of crack cocaine, with an average purity of 57%, is anywhere between $50 and $200 per gram ($90/gram on average), and the wholesale price, with an average purity of 84%, ranges from $12,000 to $35,000 per kilogram ($23,000/kilogram on average).

When sold as crack cocaine rocks, in sizes from one-tenth to one-half of a gram, a dealer can get anywhere from $10 to $20 per rock. The high is quick, and the desire for more crack cocaine is almost instantaneous, so the average crack cocaine addict spends about $186 every week. Therefore, a lot of crack cocaine is smoked to add up to the $36 billion spent on the drug in a single year.

Demographics of Crack Cocaine Users

The 2006 Monitoring the Future study, conducted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), published that 9% of all teenagers in the United States have used crack cocaine or cocaine, at least once. The 2007 version of the study reported that, of all high school seniors, 3.2% had used crack cocaine at least one time.

6.9% of those between the ages of 18 and 25 have used crack cocaine within the last year.

“The first time I smoked crack cocaine, when I put the glass pipe up to my lips, it made my lips burn, it made them numb, and the smell of smoking rock cocaine or crack is gross; it is the smell that you’ll never forget. I felt glazed over and I felt like I escaped and I could just float.”

For anyone who expresses the desire to “just try” crack cocaine, it is important to be educated on the risk being taken. Even when the first experience was unpleasant for this 27-year-old female, she still went on to use crack cocaine again, and shared the story of her first time using the drug while in rehab after progressing to the point of crack cocaine addiction.

If you, or someone you know, is using crack cocaine on any level, making the call to Recovery Now TV, at 800-281-4731, could save a life.

Polydrug Use: Crack Cocaine with Other Mind-Altering Substances

When any psychoactive drugs are used together, the risk of each drug is greatly increased. Crack cocaine is highly-addictive and unpredictable in how it affects the body, so when another set of chemicals is added, a polydrug user is risking his or her life.
A friend was freebasing heavily, and he started going into convulsions and throwing up blood. It was real awful. I was really scared and I thought he was going to die. Me and my other friend, we just kept freebasing...and then when he came out of it, he started freebasing again.

Crack cocaine is a very dangerous drug. The potential side effects of its use often end in death because of an unexpected overdose. The example above, the disclosure of a 16-year-old female crack cocaine abuser, shows a case of a young man who is lucky to be alive.

When any psychoactive drugs are used together, the risk of each drug is greatly increased. Crack cocaine is highly-addictive and unpredictable in how it affects the body, so when another set of chemicals is added, a polydrug user is risking his or her life.

Often a drug user will “shop around” for a drug of choice, trying many different categories of mind-altering substances. Some people prefer the feelings of “uppers”, or stimulants like crack cocaine, cocaine, amphetamines, meth, or prescription versions (Adderall, Ritalin). For other people, the feelings provided by a “downer”, like alcohol, prescription painkillers (Vicodin, OxyContin, Norco), or prescription anti-anxiety medications (Xanax, Valium, Klonopin) seem to better fill a need.

In those times of discovery, looking to fill a bottomless void that a substance can never truly fill, many drugs are often used at once. To heighten the effects of a benzodiazepine, like Xanax, for example, a user will often combine the pills with alcohol. Two “downers” are depressing the central nervous system and the risk of respiratory and heart failure has more than doubled with the combination of these two drugs.

Cocaine is often used with heroin, in a speedball, or added to a joint and smoked with marijuana. When cocaine is used with alcohol, the goal is to reduce the effects of cocaine. In other words, when someone has smoked too much crack cocaine, alcohol will interfere with the stimulatory effects and bring that user “back down.”

As this 36-year-old female recovering crack cocaine addict shares, the desire to balance out the effects of crack cocaine, first with alcohol, and then with heroin, another “downer”, was not effective:

Crack was my drug of choice. I would have a drink to mellow myself out. If the drink wouldn’t do it, I would go get me some heroin and snort it. It would make me come down, but it would be a whole different high and it would make me feel sick because I don’t do heroin!

When crack cocaine is being abused alone or with another drug, coma, overdose, and death are all too common. To find out how to stop polydrug use, call Recovery Now TV at 800-281-4731.

Crack Cocaine Overdose

I have seen a friend go through overdose. His skin was gray-green. His eyes rolled back, his heart stopped, and there was a gurgling sound that is right at death; and I had to bring him back and that’s enough to put the fear of God in anybody.

In 2004, the use of crack cocaine played a part in 25% of all emergency room visits in each of the major U.S. cities. (Cocaine was a factor in 41%.) The likelihood of a crack cocaine overdose is extremely high because each person’s body reacts differently, and even when tolerance has developed and the body needs more of the same drug to achieve the desired effects, just one-fiftieth of a gram can cause an overdose.

While pharmaceutical drugs are equally as dangerous when abused, and the body’s reaction cannot be predicted, each pill contains a certain amount of each chemical. Crack cocaine is not created in a lab where each “dose” is carefully calculated and those making crack cocaine aren’t working with a controlled formula. Each rock of crack cocaine a person buys is, therefore, different in chemistry and might be the dose that the body adversely reacts to without warning.

Crack cocaine overdose feels like impending death, though is not always fatal. A 36-year-old crack cocaine addict shares an experience with a nearly fatal overdose:

I almost did too much and I felt after I did it, I felt my knees buckle and I fell on the toilet stool, you know. And I was just shaking, like in a convulsion, you know. And if my buddy wasn’t there to grab me and put me in the shower, I don’t know what would’ve happened.

While this man was lucky, not every case of a crack cocaine overdose has this result. Each year, it is estimated that 2,000 to 3,000 people overdose on crack cocaine and die within five hours of exposure to a lethal dose of the drug. Additionally, many more people die immediately, or within 40 minutes of the toxic dose. Studies shows that death often occurs the following morning after hours of central nervous system depression that leads to impaired respiration and coma.

The initial toxicity of a crack cocaine overdose can cause seizures, hypertension, hyperthermia, stroke, and tachycardia, or irregular heartbeat. Cocaethylene, a chemical that remains in the blood and in certain parts of the brain after crack cocaine use, is reportedly causing heart seizures or death the day after heavy drug use. This process is even more likely when crack cocaine and alcohol are used together, where the alcohol is causing even further central nervous system depression where breathing and heart functioning are dangerously impaired.

Another, more realistic, example of what happens during a crack cocaine overdose is this experience:

I have seen a friend go through overdose. His skin was gray-green. His eyes rolled back, his heart stopped, and there was a gurgling sound that is right at death; and I had to bring him back and that’s enough to put the fear of God in anybody.

When the level of toxicity is more than the body can handle, seizure, coma, and death are the effects. 2% to 10% of all constant cocaine and crack cocaine abusers experience drug-induced seizures that either cause stroke, hemorrhage, or fatality.

Crack cocaine is one of the most dangerous drugs available. Casual use rarely stays that way; the progression to abuse and addiction are inevitable with this powerfully addictive drug. If you, or someone you love, is using crack cocaine at all, it is time to interfere and stop the progression before life consequences are beyond repair.

By calling the team at Recovery Now TV, at 800-281-4731, you can learn more about crack cocaine addiction, and find programs that will help you, or your loved one, stop using this awful drug. Call today and save a life!