Recovery Now News
  • Why Resentments Damage your chance for Recovery

    Why Resentments Damage your chance for Recovery

    Resentment is a negative emotion that comes out of an experience of being wronged. Whether the perceived wrong is truly coming from being hurt by another person, or simply something you imagine, resentment can gnaw at you, making relapse more likely or the recovery process less enjoyable.

  • 5 Things you need to know about effects of Opioid Withdrawals

    5 Things you need to know about effects of Opioid Withdrawals

    Abuse of prescription opioid painkillers can be a very dangerous addictive habit. Even if you avoid a life-threatening overdose, it can greatly harm your body, and develop a sense of tolerance and dependence that will leave you unable to function without it.

  • Identifying the Difference between Alcoholism and Problem Drinking

    Identifying the Difference between Alcoholism and Problem Drinking

    People may assume that anyone who drinks heavily is an alcoholic, but there are specific symptoms that can identify someone as an alcoholic rather than simply a problem drinker. Even though it may seem like problem drinking and alcoholism are really the same, there are distinct differences between the two and it is important know whether someone is an addict or just developing an unhealthy relationship with alcohol.

  • Canada Takes Unique approach to Combat Drug Addiction

    Canada Takes Unique approach to Combat Drug Addiction

    Traditional understandings of drug use and prevention have centered around discouraging use by punishing drug users, and educating people in ways that stigmatize users so experimentation would be discouraged. However, many of these efforts have been ineffective levels of drug use down.

  • Helping Those Who are Struggling in Early Recovery

    Helping Those Who are Struggling in Early Recovery

    Whether you are a long-time recovery veteran or you are still involved in your journey to sobriety, it can be beneficial to support and help others who are getting treatment for addiction. There are many resources available for people who are struggling with quitting their drug or alcohol use but some of the most helpful and lasting assistance can come from those who have been through it themselves.

  • Alcoholic Stigma Still is Deterrent for Professionals Who Need Treatment

    Alcoholic Stigma Still is Deterrent for Professionals Who Need Treatment

    Although there is plenty of help and support for alcoholics from all walks of life, there are still many individuals who might delay or avoid treatment because they worry about the stigma of addiction. This is especially the case for people in high profile careers or professional jobs that require them to maintain a certain image or reputation.

  • Handling Surgery and Pain Management in Recovery

    Handling Surgery and Pain Management in Recovery

    For a recovering addict, any type of substance can prove addictive because they have already shown an inability to exhibit self-control. People who are recovering from all types of addiction, whether it is alcohol, opiates or illegal drugs are told by specialists to stay away from all drugs in order to experience successful sobriety.

  • Know Your Rights: Taking Medical Leave for Opiate Recovery

    Know Your Rights: Taking Medical Leave for Opiate Recovery

    Recovery from opiate addiction can be a very painful process, and involve a lot of hard work. Addiction is an all-consuming condition that makes it impossible to live a full life, and so the recovery process is also going to be an all-consuming commitment to do whatever it takes to take care of yourself, weather out the storms of withdraw, and learn how to live a more healthy life.

  • Why Alcoholics Like to Isolate

    Why Alcoholics Like to Isolate

    For someone who likes to drink occasionally, it is usually when they are around friends or a crowd of people at a party. When it comes to alcoholics, however, they often like to drink in seclusion.

  • Why Anxiety and Depression are Prevalent in Opiate Use and Abuse

    Why Anxiety and Depression are Prevalent in Opiate Use and Abuse

    According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 9 million people both have a mental health issue and abuse drugs. Anxiety and depression are thus very strongly linked with abuse of drugs, presenting people in recovery with the challenge of treating two very different, overpowering conditions that both have to be dealt with in the recovery process.

  • ‘Downtown Divas’ is a NSFW look into the Eyes of Drug Addiction World Wide

    ‘Downtown Divas’ is a NSFW look into the Eyes of Drug Addiction World Wide

    In Downtown Divas, two artists, Loral Amir and Gigi Ben Artzi have strived to dispel this illusion of a seemingly glitzy life as a heroin addict. The artists have taken a series of striking and disturbing photos of heroin addicts who are also Russian prostitutes in very expensive designer clothes, and the results are thought provoking and gut wrenching.

  • 5 Tips on How to Stay Sober During the Holidays

    5 Tips on How to Stay Sober During the Holidays

    Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years can be challenging time when you are a recovering alcoholic. The holidays themselves and the many parties and get-togethers in between are sure to be filled with plenty of tempting kinds of wine, champagne and cocktails.

  • Use Contrary Action to Participate in Your Recovery

    Use Contrary Action to Participate in Your Recovery

    A concept that is used often in recovery circles is the idea of "contrary action" in fighting addictive impulses. Addicts can have overwhelming urges and thoughts that are self-destructive and lead down the path of dependency.

  • Positives and Negatives of Clonidine’s Use for Withdrawal Relief

    Positives and Negatives of Clonidine’s Use for Withdrawal Relief

    The high from drug use can often seem attractive in the moment, but can also cause less pleasant effects as you come down. Especially if they are used habitually over a long period of time, trying to stop substance abuse can often be a very painful process, as your body tried to adapt to going without something it had become dependent upon.

  • The Physical Consequences of DXM

    The Physical Consequences of DXM

    DXM is a drug that has grown in popularity among young people for a number of reasons. The chief reason for it popularity may be that it is found in a substance that many parents may be keeping in their home: cough syrup. Indeed, DXM is a psychoactive and highly dangerous drug that is contained in many formulas of common cough syrup.

  • 5 Ways Admitting You Have a Problem Can Change Your Life

    5 Ways Admitting You Have a Problem Can Change Your Life

    Recovering from an addiction is a long journey and the first step is admitting to yourself and others that you have a problem. Even this first step can be one of the hardest to accomplish because it means you are finally breaking through the deception and denial that could have gone on for years.

  • 5 Ways You May Be Self-Medicating

    5 Ways You May Be Self-Medicating

    When people suffer from anxiety or depression and are not getting proper treatment from psychotherapy or medication they often develop their own ways of dealing with the symptoms. Because treatment can be costly and time-consuming, those suffering from depression may take matters into their own hands without understanding the consequences of delaying professional help.

  • Elton John Helps Lady Gaga Kick Drug Addiction

    Elton John Helps Lady Gaga Kick Drug Addiction

    The singer has been open about her drug use during past interviews, saying that smoking pot is her way of dealing with stress, pain, and emotions. In 2013, Lady Gaga suffered from a hip injury that required surgery and left her wheelchair bound to recover.

  • Kendra Wilkinson Battled Drug Addiction Before Achieving Fame

    Kendra Wilkinson Battled Drug Addiction Before Achieving Fame

    The reality tv star and former Hugh Hefner girlfriend is known for being quite candid about the details of her life. In her 2011 memoir Sliding Home, Wilkinson opened up about life at the Playboy mansion, as well as her struggles with drugs and sex as a teenager in Southern California.

  • Claudia Gadelha Credits Sports To Helping Her Beat Drug Addiction

    Claudia Gadelha Credits Sports To Helping Her Beat Drug Addiction

    MMA fighter Claudia Gadelha is on the brink of winning the title if she can defeat Joanna Jedrzejczyk on December 13. Gadelha has her work cut out for her going up against the undefeated Jedrzejczyk. Winning the title is something of a dream for Gadelha, who 10 years ago led a very different life.

  • 5 Signs You Might Have Hit Your Bottom

    5 Signs You Might Have Hit Your Bottom

    For many people, it can be difficult to tell the difference between acceptable or heavy use and addiction. Here are a few indicators that can help you determine whether you have, in fact, hit your own rock bottom.

  • U2 Makes Mistake by Sending Slash a Case of Guinness

    U2 Makes Mistake by Sending Slash a Case of Guinness

    The Irish natives of U2 sent a welcoming gift to Slash upon his arrival in Dublin that unfortunately missed the mark. Slash, the renowned guitarist for Guns and Roses, has been sober for eight years and yet received a case of Guinness as a "Welcome to Dublin" package from Bono and his bandmates.

  • Brooke Shields Talks about her Mother’s Alcoholism

    Brooke Shields Talks about her Mother’s Alcoholism

    Former model and actress Brooke Shields is releasing an upcoming memoir called "There was a Little Girl" which will detail her rise to fame as well as her troubled childhood before she was launched into stardom in the 70s and 80s. Shields opens up in the book about a painful past dominated by her alcoholic mother, Teri Shields who recently passed away at the age of 79.

  • James Kottak returns to Scorpions line-up after Rehab Stint

    James Kottak returns to Scorpions line-up after Rehab Stint

    After battling some controversy with the band and finally coming to terms with his alcoholism, drummer James Kottak will finally rejoin the Scorpions for their upcoming album and next year's tour. This summer Kottak made the announcement that he would be working with Bob Forrest, an addiction specialist known for working with musicians and "Celebrity Rehab".

  • California Taking Steps To Change Drug Incarceration Laws

    California Taking Steps To Change Drug Incarceration Laws

    After recently passing proposition 47 in the November elections, California voters took a significant step toward ending mass incarceration and the war on drugs. The state already made steps toward changing drug law in 2012 when it reformed the 'three strikes law'.

  • Methadone Turns 50

    Methadone Turns 50

    Although the drug methadone was first developed during World War II in Germany, it wasn't until the mid-sixties that it began to be used as a treatment for heroin addiction. In the 40s and 50s the drug was not broadly used at first because of reported side effects such as nausea and possible overdose.

  • Florida Judge Seeks Pay While In Alcohol Treatment Program

    Florida Judge Seeks Pay While In Alcohol Treatment Program

    A judge for Broward County that was recently suspended by the Supreme Court because of her alcohol problem and is currently undergoing treatment has been looking for continued pay. Judge Gisele Pollack was accused of being intoxicated twice in court and driving under the influence around local streets in the area.

  • Alcoholic Genetics And The Role They Play In Getting Sober

    Alcoholic Genetics And The Role They Play In Getting Sober

    Genetics plays a large part in determining whether a person is susceptible to addiction. Experts have determined that genetics are responsible for about half of addictive behavior and that environmental factors are responsible for the other half.

  • Bunavail Is Approved By FDA To Treat Opioid Addiction

    Bunavail Is Approved By FDA To Treat Opioid Addiction

    Vicodin, morphine, OxyContin, methadone, heroin, and codeine are commonly abused opioid drugs. There are more than two million people with opioid dependence who require some type of treatment to overcome their addiction.

  • Treatment Options for those Struggling with Alcoholism

    Treatment Options for those Struggling with Alcoholism

    Alcoholism is a serious disease affecting 6.8 percent of Americans. Alcohol addiction occurs when the body becomes chemically dependent upon the substance, and a person may also have an emotional dependence as well.

Recovery Concierge

Drug and alcohol abuse often has a reputation as a problem that only affects inner city and unemployed populations. However, anyone of any class, race, gender, socioeconomic level, employment status, and geographic location can develop a problem with drugs or alcohol. In fact, the level of drug use, especially prescription drug abuse, among a white, suburban and higher socioeconomic class has risen exponentially in the past decade.

Many addicts are afraid to go to rehab, and believe it is a shameful experience. However, entering rehab is actually a powerful action. It means that a person is taking control of his or her life and striving to make positive changes. Another common assumption is that the facilities are uncomfortable and grim, except for celebrities. However, there are several rehab facilities that offer programs with luxurious accommodations and extra amenities to make the stay almost feel like home, or a stay at a four star hotel, that are surprisingly affordable and accessible. Some programs also offer a recovery concierge to ensure that clients receive the best care possible, and to help custom build the treatment program to the unique situation.

Substance abuse is a unique problem that develops differently in each individual, so the treatment program should adapt to the person and his or her situation rather than the substance of abuse. There are many programs available in luxury treatment programs that focus on a holistic approach customized to the person, instead of a cookie cutter approach to rehab. These programs offer many services in addition to the standard alcohol and drug addiction treatment program.

Despite the war on drugs, substance abuse and addiction remains a significant problem in America across all demographics. According to the Results from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, the latest data available from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), 124 million Americans (48 percent) have taken illicit drugs at some point in their lifetime, 42 million (16 percent) have taken them in the past year, and 23 million (9.2 percent) have used in the past month.

The most commonly abused illicit drug is marijuana; around 111 million people (42.8 percent) have consumed marijuana in their lifetime, 31 million (12.1 percent) have used it in the past year, and 18.8 million (7.3 percent) have in the past month. The second most commonly abused illicit drug is non-medical use of prescription medication, with 54 million people (20.9 percent) having used prescription medication in their lifetime, 16.6 million (6.4 percent) in the past year, and 6.8 million (2.6 percent) in the past month. 

Not everyone who has used illicit drugs become addicted or regularly abuses the substances. About 7 million people meet the criteria for dependence or abuse, which is 2.8 percent of the population. However, only 19.1 percent of people, or 1.5 million, actually receive the necessary treatment. 

Alcohol is the most commonly abused substance, with 214 million Americans (82.3 percent) have consumed it at some point in their lifetime, 173 million (66.7 percent) have consumed alcohol in the past year, and 135 million (52.1 percent) have drank alcohol in the past month. Many of the people who consume alcohol, even within the past month, drink moderate amounts and do not have a problem. However, there are still many people who problem drink. Around 59 million people (6.2 percent) have engaged in binge drinking in the past month and 17 million (6.5 percent) have engage din heavy drinking. These behavior patterns put people at risk of developing a substance abuse problem. About 18.2 million people meet the criteria for needing treatment for alcohol, but only 8.2 percent actually receive it.

Drug and alcohol abuse and addiction happens across all demographics. Although many people consider substance abuse to be a more significant problem among minorities, the highest numbers of users are actually white, with 87.5 million (51.6 percent) white Americans having had illicit drugs at some point in their lives, 27 million (15.9 percent) in the past year and 15.6 million (9.2 percent) in the past month. In comparison, the numbers for African Americans are 14.2 million (46.5 percent) having used in the lifetime, 5.7 million (18.7 percent) in the past year, and 3.4 million (11.3 percent) in the past month. For Hispanic populations, the numbers are 16.4 million (40.8 percent) having used in their lifetime, 6.3 million (15.7 percent) in the past year, and 3.3 million (8.3 percent) in the past month. For dependency, 4.5 million white people meet the criteria, compared to 1.2 million African Americans and 1.1 million Latinos.

For alcohol, the numbers are closer between the different races. In the white population, 87.1 percent have used alcohol in their lifetime, 76.1 percent of African Americans have, and 73.9 percent of Hispanics have. The numbers are slightly different for past year use, with 71.5 percent of whites, 59.6 percent of African Americans, and 57.8 percent of Hispanics having consumed alcohol in the past year. In the past month, 57.4 percent of whites, 43.2 percent of African Americans, and 41.8 percent of Hispanics have consumed alcohol.

There is a difference between men and women as well. Men have a higher rate of both alcohol and drug use than women. About 11.6 percent of men currently use illicit drugs, compared to 6.9 percent of women. About 56.5 percent of men and 47.9 percent of women are current drinkers. 

Many people assume that drug addicts are typically unemployed. Although unemployed people have a higher rate of current illicit drug use (18.1 percent compared to 8.9 percent for full time workers and 12.5 percent for part time), the number of current users is actually higher in those who are employed. Out of the 21.5 million current illicit drug users, 14.6 million or 67.9 percent were employed either full or part time.

More employed people drink than unemployed. For those who currently drink alcohol, 64.8 percent are employed full time, compared to 54.9 percent who are unemployed. Even those who binge drink are more commonly employed. About 75 percent of those who were binge drinkers were employed, and 74 percent of heavy drinkers were also employed.

Many people who meet the criteria for dependency are employed. About 16.9 percent of unemployed people meet the criteria for dependency or abuse, compared to 9.1 percent full time workers and 10.3 percent part time. However, the majority (51.9 percent) of those who were dependent on a substance are employed full time.

What is a Recovery Concierge?

A recovery concierge may have many different functions, as well as different names, depending on the facility to which he or she is associated. The term is derived from the word concierge, which has two similar definitions. One is a caretaker of a small hotel or apartment complex who lives on the grounds, and the other is a hotel employee who assists guests by arranging what is needed, such as making theater and restaurant reservations or arranging tours.

In recovery, the concierge acts similarly by working one-on-one with the client to ensure that the treatment program is tailor made to the individual situation and needs. They will work with the individual, and the family if appropriate, to ensure all the needs are met.

Typical Concierge Services

Recovery concierge might handle many different services within a facility, and there might be more than one person handling the various facets of the job. The facility might offer a variety of services, such as nanny services, chauffeuring, spa services, exercise and spa opportunities, group meetings, life coaching, travel arrangements, and more. The concierge will work with the client to schedule these various services and arrange for transportation, if necessary. Not every treatment facility will have an onsite concierge, but many will still offer customized treatment options and a personal experience.

Treatment for Addiction

The majority of people with an addition to drugs or alcohol do not seek treatment. There are many reasons for this, including lack of insurance and funds, but the main reason is denial of a problem. A person does not have to hit rock bottom to benefit from receiving treatment. In fact, the earlier a person undergoes treatment, the better chance he or she has with recovery, and a lower risk of relapse. There are many different options for treatment modalities to help a person overcome substance abuse or addiction. Many treatment facilities focus on a holistic approach, so they offer several of these methods, including psychotherapy, group sessions, detox services, medication, and lifestyle and behavioral changes.

A relationship concierge, or the equivalent, will go over the treatment options with a client to help create the ideal treatment program, with the guidance of the psychologists, psychiatrists, and other recovery professionals on staff.

Psychotherapy is one of the essential components of addiction treatment. Many people turn to drugs or alcohol to self-medicate a mental health disorder, or to numb strong negative emotions and feelings. Additionally, many people use mood-altering substances as a form of stress-relief. By relying on these substances, a person has a higher risk of developing a dependency upon the substance. Without understanding the underlying reasons for the abuse, a person will not be able to overcome the problem. He or she will still encounter the issues, but will be ill-equipped to manage them. The most common form of therapy for addiction is cognitive behavioral therapy. This provides a way for a person to understand the behavior and issues fueling the decision to drink or use drugs, and replace those actions with healthier alternatives.

Many treatment facilities offer group psychotherapy sessions. These often teach important life skills necessary for overcoming addiction, including coping mechanisms, healthy stress relief techniques, anger management, how to overcome body image or self-esteem issues, family and relationship therapy, and more. By engaging in these group sessions, people gain support from other individuals who have undergone similar experiences as them. This facilitates and complements many of the problems that individual psychotherapy covers. Facilities often offer several group sessions every day, led by a certified counselor or therapist, which allows them to provide a more intensive treatment. Individual psychotherapy, even in a rehab facility, often only occurs a few times a week at most. By integrating group therapy, a facility can offer a wider range of help for the clients.

The first step for any treatment program is detox. There are several different options for detox, including natural or medically assisted. The type of detox that works best for a person depends on the substance or substances of choice, the length of abuse or addiction, and the current health of a person.

Medically assisted detox includes using medication that acts similarly to addictive substances to wean a person off of the drug while minimizing withdrawal symptoms. Common drugs include methadone, benzodiazepines, and buprenorphine.

Natural detox means undergoing detox without the use of medication. Some programs use vitamins and supplements, and possibly even diet and saunas, to help the body naturally detox itself. A new program uses an IV drip infused with high quantities of essential vitamins and minerals, along with NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), to stimulate the body's own recovery, while minimizing the effects of withdraw.

A person can undergo detox at a hospital setting, a residential detox facility, or at home as an outpatient. Some recovery facilities also offer customized in home detox services that have more personalized treatment than standard outpatient programs. If a person is at high risk of medical complications, then a hospital setting is best. Alcohol detox is the most dangerous and should almost always be done under some form of medical supervision.

Within treatment services, some places also use medication to facilitate the treatment once detox is over. In the case of opiate addiction, this might be continuing methadone or buprenorphine for an extended period of time. For alcohol abuse and addiction, this could include disulfiram (Antabuse), naltrexone (ReVia, Vivitrol), or acamprosate (Campral).

If a person has any medical conditions or mental health disorders, they may be prescribed medication to help recover from these conditions. A treatment facility will have someone manage the medication to ensure that no further abuse is done.

A comprehensive approach to addiction treatment must include lifestyle and behavioral changes. Many people become addicted to drugs or alcohol due to mental or emotional problems, or undue stress. By teaching how to exchange the unhealthy behavioral patterns with healthy ones, a person can learn to manage these behaviors. Examples of lifestyle skills include mindfulness activities, yoga, meditation, and tai chi. Exercise has been shown to help with recovery, so many programs offer gyms on site or access to fitness centers. Additionally, some programs include acupuncture or massage therapy. Programs might offer a nutritionist or dietician to create healthy meals that facilitate the body's recovery from drugs and alcohol, as well as teach healthy eating options and meal plans to help a person implement it in their own life.

Many of the lifestyle options taught to patients are meant to provide a healthy alternative to drinking and doing drugs, as well as be something they can take home and continue to do. Many of them have been proven to help with recovery.

Complimentary alternative therapies may also be included, such as music therapy, art therapy or equine therapy. These provide alternative ways to manage emotional trauma and stress, often without the need for verbal discussion. It often complements talk therapy, especially for those who have difficulty voicing their underlying problems and issues.

The recovery concierge will talk with clients about the various offerings, and make any necessary arrangements.

Treatment Options

There are several options for treatment facilities, ranging from hospitalization to outpatient programs. Many programs recommend clients undergo a continuum of care, starting with a more intensive program and then stepping down through the lower levels, including aftercare or extended care programs, to reduce the risk of relapse. When a person connects with a facility, they can discuss the available options to find the best fit for the situation. The length of addiction and intensity of the problem dictates the best option. A recovery concierge or other worker can help to designate the right level and type of treatment to ensure the best chance at recovery.

Hospitalization is the most intensive form of treatment. A person usually only stays in a hospital for a shorter period of time, until they are stable enough to move to a residential rehab facility. They may just go through detox in a hospital, or they may also be involved in some of the other threaten programs, depending on the situation and the facility. Some places offer partial hospitalization, where a person remains at home during the night, but comes in for intensive programming during the day.

Residential rehab is similar to hospitalization, as a person remains on site 24/7 and has continuous care. However, residential rehab takes place in dedicated facilities for addiction treatment, and it often offers a more comfortable environment. It also offers a situation closer to a person's home life, which can help a person learn to transition back to their normal life without drugs and alcohol.

Intensive outpatient program is one that occurs for about 10 to 15 hours a week. A person can remain living at home and working while undergoing treatment. It is a good compromise between the more intensive residential programs and being able to continue working, or taking care of other responsibilities.

Some people are able to successfully recover through just participating in weekly psychotherapy programs and enrolling in support groups, such as Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous. However, most people get the best support from a more intensive treatment.

Some rehab facilities offer specialized services or treatment programs. For example, some might have gender specific programs, such as women only treatment facilities. Others might have a stronger emphasis on spirituality, such as a program run by a particular religious organization. Some programs offer extra support for the GBLT community. Others involve the family to facilitate the healing of familial relationships. There are also dual diagnosis facilities, which treat co-occurring conditions, such as drug or alcohol addiction and a mental health disorder. You can also find executive programs, which offer a luxurious situation where a person will have the amenities to continue to work while in rehab. Many programs also offer custom services, such as in home detox.

How to Know When to Seek Help

Denial can be one of the most significant hurdles to treatment. Unless a person decides there is a problem and he or she wants to change, he or she will often struggle and continually relapse. It is a myth that a person must hit rock bottom, having lost everything, including a job, family, friends, and more. The earlier a person enters treatment, the better. There are a few important red flags of abuse or addiction that demonstrate a person should seek some kind of treatment for his or her problem.

Each substance has its own unique symptoms of abuse or addiction, but there are common behaviors that signal a person might have a problem. These include:

  1. Tolerance to the substance
  2. Withdrawal symptoms when the substance is not consumed
  3. Craving or compulsion to use the substance
  4. Failing to stop using the substance
  5. Engaging in dangerous behavior to procure the substance
  6. Trouble with the law
  7. Problems with work, school, or relationships
  8. Isolating behavior
  9. No longer enjoying favorite activities
  10. Stealing in order to get the substance
  11. Lying about the consumption of a person
  12. Secretive behavior
  13. Mood swings
  14. Changes in appetite or weight
  15. Problems with sleeping, such as insomnia

If a person has a problem, but struggles to admit to it, an intervention could help him or her to get the help he or she needs. An intervention is a planned meeting with a small group of family and friends that provides a forum for discussing troublesome behavioral patterns. It ends with making the addict decide between entering a treatment program and dealing with a set of specific consequences. Before an intervention, the planning team must research and set up the treatment program. A recovery concierge can help to arrange the treatment for the person, as well as assist with planning the intervention, including finding an interventionist. Although a professional interventionist is not necessary, it can help to ensure the intervention goes well.