drugs addiction Recovery Now

About Recovery Now TV

Recovery Now TV is designed to build awareness surrounding the recovery from drug and alcohol addiction. We believe that treatment and recovery WORKS. The video content and the dialogue between people who have recovered brings hope to those who are still struggling with their addiction.

Watch Videos Referrals & Shows

Recovery Now News
  • Is Taking Medication As Prescribed Relapsing?

    Is Taking Medication As Prescribed Relapsing?

    Prescription medication is a hot topic in recovery. Many recovering addicts stay away from all types of medication, using natural alternatives such as herbal remedies when they become sick or have some other condition.

  • 10 Things You Didn't Know Where Possible Before Recovery

    10 Things You Didn't Know Where Possible Before Recovery

    Many addicts do not believe they are strong enough to overcome their addiction, and so they never actually seek out professional treatment. For many, they remain in denial that they even have a problem, and continue to engage in destructive behavior.

  • 10 Questions To Ask Yourself If You Are Looking For Recovery

    10 Questions To Ask Yourself If You Are Looking For Recovery

    Before you enter a recovery program, you should ask yourself these ten questions to help you find the right treatment program for your unique situation. This will facilitate your research into addiction treatment facilities for a better recovery and reduce your risk relapse.

  • Xanax’s Effect on the Brain

    Xanax’s Effect on the Brain

    Medications like Xanax may be helpful in alleviating symptoms of anxiety but evidence shows that long term use of the drug can lead to addiction and also be harmful to the brain. The drug's damaging effect on the brain can lead to problems like mental and behavioral abnormalities like dementia.

  • What the Bump to Schedule II means for Hydrocodone

    What the Bump to Schedule II means for Hydrocodone

    In a recent final ruling the DEA chose to move hydrocodone combination products from schedule III to schedule II. Hydrocodone products are a type of narcotic painkiller that is commonly prescribed to patients recovering from surgery or experiencing chronic pain.

  • Understanding Delirium Tremens and What Your Body is Saying

    Understanding Delirium Tremens and What Your Body is Saying

    Withdrawal from an alcohol addiction can involve a number of painful and uncomfortable symptoms that occur throughout the process of detox. One of the most severe symptoms of alcohol withdrawal is delirium tremens and it tends to be a problem for the heaviest drinkers who are attempting to quit cold turkey.

  • How to Get the Most Out Of Your Recovery from Addiction

    How to Get the Most Out Of Your Recovery from Addiction

    Spending time at a rehab facility can be costly and takes a great deal of time out of your work schedule so there is no reason to throw away the experience. Rehab is an opportunity that you may not have the means to do again in many cases so it is important to invest all your energy and effort into recovery.

  • Why Massachusetts Rate Of Drug Addicted Babies Has Exploded

    Why Massachusetts Rate Of Drug Addicted Babies Has Exploded

    A recent study has found that Massachusetts has three times than the nationwide rate of babies born with opiates in their systems. The numbers, based on the hospital diagnosis data that is reported to the federal government, show that in 2013, 1,300 Massachusetts babies (or about 17.5 per 1000 births) were born having narcotics in their system.

  • Elizabeth Pena’s Death Linked to Alcoholism

    Elizabeth Pena’s Death Linked to Alcoholism

    The life-long acting career of Elizabeth Pena ended abruptly on October 14th in Los Angeles as passed away at only age 55. The actress' death shocked her family, fans and other Hollywood stars that were close to her.

  • A Breakdown of the Types of Addiction Treatment

    A Breakdown of the Types of Addiction Treatment

    While people suffering from addiction can experience similar symptoms, people may need different kinds of treatment depending on their circumstances and what works best with their lifestyle. Some addicts may have special needs that would require a certain type of treatment center or length of treatment.

  • The Struggle of Staying Sober with Chronic Pain

    The Struggle of Staying Sober with Chronic Pain

    Painkillers like prescription opiates such as vicodin and oxycontin are among the most dangerous and addictive drugs in the county. Addiction to opiates is steadily rising, and communities everywhere are struggling to find a solution to what has been referred to by many addiction health experts as nothing short of an epidemic.

  • Put a Stop to the Re-Direction of Obsession in Recovery

    Put a Stop to the Re-Direction of Obsession in Recovery

    For someone suffering from an addiction, refraining from their drug of choice may be one of the most difficult things they ever try to accomplish. Maintaining their self-control and not engaging in indulgent behavior with a particular drug may be so stressful and straining that they begin to obsess over something else.

  • 5 Experiences that Happen in Early Sobriety

    5 Experiences that Happen in Early Sobriety

    Early sobriety is a time of major chafe and transformation. Most recovering addicts find that everything they have ever thought or believed comes into question when they are first sober and able to see with some clarity for the first time in what may be a while.

  • Self Love Is Part of the Recovery Process

    Self Love Is Part of the Recovery Process

    Recovery is a time of major reflection and growth for a recovering addict. When a person is using drugs and alcohol, they often face problems like low self-esteem and low self worth.

  • Realities Of Mixing Prescriptions With Other Substances

    Realities Of Mixing Prescriptions With Other Substances

    When you are prescribed various medications, you will be given an information sheet detailing the potential risks and side effects, as well as substances to avoid. Even consuming some herbal supplements, over the counter medication, or small quantities of alcohol while taking certain medications can cause significant health problems, including death.

  • Alcoholic Drinking Realities and Mythologies Revealed

    Alcoholic Drinking Realities and Mythologies Revealed

    Alcoholism is one of the most well-known types of drug addictions in the U.S. with an estimated 17 million people drinking excessively on a regular basis. As common as alcohol abuse seems, there are still many misconceptions about alcohol and drinking addictions.

  • 5 Tips For A Healthy Relationship in Recovery

    5 Tips For A Healthy Relationship in Recovery

    It has often been said that relationships are work, and, as anyone who has begun the process of recovery knows, so is getting sober. Overcoming the challenges presented by sobriety and by the life long process that is recovery requires dedication and compassion toward one's self.

  • 10 Things People in Recovery Deal with At Parties

    10 Things People in Recovery Deal with At Parties

    In American culture, drinking alcohol is considered the norm especially at celebrations and social gatherings. For someone in recovery who is using all of their willpower not to take a drink, going to a party can mean they are bombarded with potential triggers.

  • The Importance of Outside Help for those with Co-Occurring Disorders

    The Importance of Outside Help for those with Co-Occurring Disorders

    A co-occurring disorder is defined as the existence of a substance abuse disorder and a mental health issue taking place at the same time, the two intensifying each other. Several surveys and studies have shown this is a very common condition. A 1990 study lead by R.J.

  • 5 ways Vivitrol helps break Opioid Addiction

    5 ways Vivitrol helps break Opioid Addiction

    Recovery from opioid addiction can often be a difficult process involving a painful withdraw process. Psychological and physical addictions often combine to create powerful cravings that can be extremely difficult to overcome.

  • Alcohol Withdrawal and the Symptoms that Accompany It

    Alcohol Withdrawal and the Symptoms that Accompany It

    In the long run, sobriety is one of the best decisions a heavy and compulsive drinker can make, brining many benefits and restoring health. However, in the short term, withdraw from alcohol addiction can often be difficult.

  • 5 Reasons to Properly Plan an Intervention

    5 Reasons to Properly Plan an Intervention

    At its core, an intervention is an act of profound love. Although it can sometimes be very difficult or stressful to confront a person, if done correctly, it can make a huge difference in someone's life. Many people engaged in addictive behavior cope with their addiction through narratives of denial, ways of justifying their behavior to make it seem "not all that bad."

  • 5 Reasons Binge Drinking can Follow you Through Life

    5 Reasons Binge Drinking can Follow you Through Life

    A man who drinks more than 5 alcoholic beverages in a two hour period or a woman who drinks more than four is considered to be binge drinking. Drinking that amount of alcohol is not all that unusual for people at parties and it might seem like harmless fun.

  • How to Handle Substance Abuse in a Significant Other

    How to Handle Substance Abuse in a Significant Other

    Addiction is a disease that can ruin relationships and even tear apart marriages without the right kind of help and support. If you are in a relationship with an addict then you have probably experienced the worst side of them and dealt with the frustration of seeing them drunk or high day after day.

  • Linking Substance Abuse and Domestic Violence

    Linking Substance Abuse and Domestic Violence

    Addiction is a disease that can have negative consequences not only for the person abusing drugs or alcohol but also for everyone close to them. Substance abuse impacts nearly every aspect of a person's life and most commonly leads to marital and family problems.

  • 5 Reasons Why Staying Stopped is Harder than Stopping

    5 Reasons Why Staying Stopped is Harder than Stopping

    Someone struggling with a substance abuse problem may find it easy to gather up the resolve to say they are going to quit. They may even be successful at quitting and remain sober for a few months but find that they inevitably return to their old habits and are right back where they started.

  • Is Kratom a Substitute for Opiates or a Tool For Getting Clean?

    Is Kratom a Substitute for Opiates or a Tool For Getting Clean?

    Opiate abuse is one of the fastest growing and most deadly diseases currently facing the United States. Each year, thousands of people overdose on heroin or prescription opiates, and despite the best efforts of law enforcement and public health officials, opiate addiction continues to be on the steady incline.

  • Recognizing the Signs of Active Alcoholism

    Recognizing the Signs of Active Alcoholism

    Alcoholism is a disease that strikes people of all ages and from all walks of life. Like all addictions, alcohol often leads the person who is suffering from alcoholism to deliberately conceal their alcohol abuse from others. Many loved ones may also not be entirely aware of what constitutes alcoholism, and whether their loved one is truly suffering from alcohol addiction.

  • How valuable is Methadone Treatment to Opioid Addicts?

    How valuable is Methadone Treatment to Opioid Addicts?

    Prescription drug abuse, of opioid painkillers especially, is a very fast rising form of drug addiction, claiming more lives then any other form of preventable death. Even when these prescriptions are not deliberately misused, they can easily become addictive, and often have a long and painful withdraw process.

  • What Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs Aim to Prevent

    What Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs Aim to Prevent

    In an effort to identify instances of prescription drug abuse and reduce the cases of addiction, prescription drug monitoring programs are sharing prescription records with doctors and pharmacists in other states. A prescription drug monitoring program is a statewide electronic database which collects designated data on prescribed substances that are dispensed within the state.

  • Veterans with PTSD More Likely to Be Prescribed Painkillers

    Veterans with PTSD More Likely to Be Prescribed Painkillers

    The men and women who serve in the military may return home as heroes but they are often dealing with a myriad of problems after completing their service. Veterans often must cope with severe pain because of combat-related injuries and mental health problems such as PTSD or post-traumatic stress disorder.

  • Practicing Tough Love with an Alcoholic

    Practicing Tough Love with an Alcoholic

    Seeing someone you really care about in the middle of something as intensely all consuming and harmful as an alcohol addiction can sometimes be excruciatingly painful. A life built around nothing but drinking can brings a lot of harm with it.

  • State of New York Publishes Site to help Struggling Opioid Addicts

    State of New York Publishes Site to help Struggling Opioid Addicts

    The misuse and addiction of opioid painkillers is one of the most rapidly growing and serious drug addiction epidemics to plague the United States. The state of New York, which has the country's third highest population, has not been immune to the problems associated with this ongoing and growing drug problem.

Recovery Concierge

Drug and alcohol abuse often has a reputation as a problem that only affects inner city and unemployed populations. However, anyone of any class, race, gender, socioeconomic level, employment status, and geographic location can develop a problem with drugs or alcohol. In fact, the level of drug use, especially prescription drug abuse, among a white, suburban and higher socioeconomic class has risen exponentially in the past decade.

Many addicts are afraid to go to rehab, and believe it is a shameful experience. However, entering rehab is actually a powerful action. It means that a person is taking control of his or her life and striving to make positive changes. Another common assumption is that the facilities are uncomfortable and grim, except for celebrities. However, there are several rehab facilities that offer programs with luxurious accommodations and extra amenities to make the stay almost feel like home, or a stay at a four star hotel, that are surprisingly affordable and accessible. Some programs also offer a recovery concierge to ensure that clients receive the best care possible, and to help custom build the treatment program to the unique situation.

Substance abuse is a unique problem that develops differently in each individual, so the treatment program should adapt to the person and his or her situation rather than the substance of abuse. There are many programs available in luxury treatment programs that focus on a holistic approach customized to the person, instead of a cookie cutter approach to rehab. These programs offer many services in addition to the standard alcohol and drug addiction treatment program.

Despite the war on drugs, substance abuse and addiction remains a significant problem in America across all demographics. According to the Results from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, the latest data available from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), 124 million Americans (48 percent) have taken illicit drugs at some point in their lifetime, 42 million (16 percent) have taken them in the past year, and 23 million (9.2 percent) have used in the past month.

The most commonly abused illicit drug is marijuana; around 111 million people (42.8 percent) have consumed marijuana in their lifetime, 31 million (12.1 percent) have used it in the past year, and 18.8 million (7.3 percent) have in the past month. The second most commonly abused illicit drug is non-medical use of prescription medication, with 54 million people (20.9 percent) having used prescription medication in their lifetime, 16.6 million (6.4 percent) in the past year, and 6.8 million (2.6 percent) in the past month. 

Not everyone who has used illicit drugs become addicted or regularly abuses the substances. About 7 million people meet the criteria for dependence or abuse, which is 2.8 percent of the population. However, only 19.1 percent of people, or 1.5 million, actually receive the necessary treatment. 

Alcohol is the most commonly abused substance, with 214 million Americans (82.3 percent) have consumed it at some point in their lifetime, 173 million (66.7 percent) have consumed alcohol in the past year, and 135 million (52.1 percent) have drank alcohol in the past month. Many of the people who consume alcohol, even within the past month, drink moderate amounts and do not have a problem. However, there are still many people who problem drink. Around 59 million people (6.2 percent) have engaged in binge drinking in the past month and 17 million (6.5 percent) have engage din heavy drinking. These behavior patterns put people at risk of developing a substance abuse problem. About 18.2 million people meet the criteria for needing treatment for alcohol, but only 8.2 percent actually receive it.

Drug and alcohol abuse and addiction happens across all demographics. Although many people consider substance abuse to be a more significant problem among minorities, the highest numbers of users are actually white, with 87.5 million (51.6 percent) white Americans having had illicit drugs at some point in their lives, 27 million (15.9 percent) in the past year and 15.6 million (9.2 percent) in the past month. In comparison, the numbers for African Americans are 14.2 million (46.5 percent) having used in the lifetime, 5.7 million (18.7 percent) in the past year, and 3.4 million (11.3 percent) in the past month. For Hispanic populations, the numbers are 16.4 million (40.8 percent) having used in their lifetime, 6.3 million (15.7 percent) in the past year, and 3.3 million (8.3 percent) in the past month. For dependency, 4.5 million white people meet the criteria, compared to 1.2 million African Americans and 1.1 million Latinos.

For alcohol, the numbers are closer between the different races. In the white population, 87.1 percent have used alcohol in their lifetime, 76.1 percent of African Americans have, and 73.9 percent of Hispanics have. The numbers are slightly different for past year use, with 71.5 percent of whites, 59.6 percent of African Americans, and 57.8 percent of Hispanics having consumed alcohol in the past year. In the past month, 57.4 percent of whites, 43.2 percent of African Americans, and 41.8 percent of Hispanics have consumed alcohol.

There is a difference between men and women as well. Men have a higher rate of both alcohol and drug use than women. About 11.6 percent of men currently use illicit drugs, compared to 6.9 percent of women. About 56.5 percent of men and 47.9 percent of women are current drinkers. 

Many people assume that drug addicts are typically unemployed. Although unemployed people have a higher rate of current illicit drug use (18.1 percent compared to 8.9 percent for full time workers and 12.5 percent for part time), the number of current users is actually higher in those who are employed. Out of the 21.5 million current illicit drug users, 14.6 million or 67.9 percent were employed either full or part time.

More employed people drink than unemployed. For those who currently drink alcohol, 64.8 percent are employed full time, compared to 54.9 percent who are unemployed. Even those who binge drink are more commonly employed. About 75 percent of those who were binge drinkers were employed, and 74 percent of heavy drinkers were also employed.

Many people who meet the criteria for dependency are employed. About 16.9 percent of unemployed people meet the criteria for dependency or abuse, compared to 9.1 percent full time workers and 10.3 percent part time. However, the majority (51.9 percent) of those who were dependent on a substance are employed full time.

What is a Recovery Concierge?

A recovery concierge may have many different functions, as well as different names, depending on the facility to which he or she is associated. The term is derived from the word concierge, which has two similar definitions. One is a caretaker of a small hotel or apartment complex who lives on the grounds, and the other is a hotel employee who assists guests by arranging what is needed, such as making theater and restaurant reservations or arranging tours.

In recovery, the concierge acts similarly by working one-on-one with the client to ensure that the treatment program is tailor made to the individual situation and needs. They will work with the individual, and the family if appropriate, to ensure all the needs are met.

Typical Concierge Services

Recovery concierge might handle many different services within a facility, and there might be more than one person handling the various facets of the job. The facility might offer a variety of services, such as nanny services, chauffeuring, spa services, exercise and spa opportunities, group meetings, life coaching, travel arrangements, and more. The concierge will work with the client to schedule these various services and arrange for transportation, if necessary. Not every treatment facility will have an onsite concierge, but many will still offer customized treatment options and a personal experience.

Treatment for Addiction

The majority of people with an addition to drugs or alcohol do not seek treatment. There are many reasons for this, including lack of insurance and funds, but the main reason is denial of a problem. A person does not have to hit rock bottom to benefit from receiving treatment. In fact, the earlier a person undergoes treatment, the better chance he or she has with recovery, and a lower risk of relapse. There are many different options for treatment modalities to help a person overcome substance abuse or addiction. Many treatment facilities focus on a holistic approach, so they offer several of these methods, including psychotherapy, group sessions, detox services, medication, and lifestyle and behavioral changes.

A relationship concierge, or the equivalent, will go over the treatment options with a client to help create the ideal treatment program, with the guidance of the psychologists, psychiatrists, and other recovery professionals on staff.

Psychotherapy is one of the essential components of addiction treatment. Many people turn to drugs or alcohol to self-medicate a mental health disorder, or to numb strong negative emotions and feelings. Additionally, many people use mood-altering substances as a form of stress-relief. By relying on these substances, a person has a higher risk of developing a dependency upon the substance. Without understanding the underlying reasons for the abuse, a person will not be able to overcome the problem. He or she will still encounter the issues, but will be ill-equipped to manage them. The most common form of therapy for addiction is cognitive behavioral therapy. This provides a way for a person to understand the behavior and issues fueling the decision to drink or use drugs, and replace those actions with healthier alternatives.

Many treatment facilities offer group psychotherapy sessions. These often teach important life skills necessary for overcoming addiction, including coping mechanisms, healthy stress relief techniques, anger management, how to overcome body image or self-esteem issues, family and relationship therapy, and more. By engaging in these group sessions, people gain support from other individuals who have undergone similar experiences as them. This facilitates and complements many of the problems that individual psychotherapy covers. Facilities often offer several group sessions every day, led by a certified counselor or therapist, which allows them to provide a more intensive treatment. Individual psychotherapy, even in a rehab facility, often only occurs a few times a week at most. By integrating group therapy, a facility can offer a wider range of help for the clients.

The first step for any treatment program is detox. There are several different options for detox, including natural or medically assisted. The type of detox that works best for a person depends on the substance or substances of choice, the length of abuse or addiction, and the current health of a person.

Medically assisted detox includes using medication that acts similarly to addictive substances to wean a person off of the drug while minimizing withdrawal symptoms. Common drugs include methadone, benzodiazepines, and buprenorphine.

Natural detox means undergoing detox without the use of medication. Some programs use vitamins and supplements, and possibly even diet and saunas, to help the body naturally detox itself. A new program uses an IV drip infused with high quantities of essential vitamins and minerals, along with NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), to stimulate the body's own recovery, while minimizing the effects of withdraw.

A person can undergo detox at a hospital setting, a residential detox facility, or at home as an outpatient. Some recovery facilities also offer customized in home detox services that have more personalized treatment than standard outpatient programs. If a person is at high risk of medical complications, then a hospital setting is best. Alcohol detox is the most dangerous and should almost always be done under some form of medical supervision.

Within treatment services, some places also use medication to facilitate the treatment once detox is over. In the case of opiate addiction, this might be continuing methadone or buprenorphine for an extended period of time. For alcohol abuse and addiction, this could include disulfiram (Antabuse), naltrexone (ReVia, Vivitrol), or acamprosate (Campral).

If a person has any medical conditions or mental health disorders, they may be prescribed medication to help recover from these conditions. A treatment facility will have someone manage the medication to ensure that no further abuse is done.

A comprehensive approach to addiction treatment must include lifestyle and behavioral changes. Many people become addicted to drugs or alcohol due to mental or emotional problems, or undue stress. By teaching how to exchange the unhealthy behavioral patterns with healthy ones, a person can learn to manage these behaviors. Examples of lifestyle skills include mindfulness activities, yoga, meditation, and tai chi. Exercise has been shown to help with recovery, so many programs offer gyms on site or access to fitness centers. Additionally, some programs include acupuncture or massage therapy. Programs might offer a nutritionist or dietician to create healthy meals that facilitate the body's recovery from drugs and alcohol, as well as teach healthy eating options and meal plans to help a person implement it in their own life.

Many of the lifestyle options taught to patients are meant to provide a healthy alternative to drinking and doing drugs, as well as be something they can take home and continue to do. Many of them have been proven to help with recovery.

Complimentary alternative therapies may also be included, such as music therapy, art therapy or equine therapy. These provide alternative ways to manage emotional trauma and stress, often without the need for verbal discussion. It often complements talk therapy, especially for those who have difficulty voicing their underlying problems and issues.

The recovery concierge will talk with clients about the various offerings, and make any necessary arrangements.

Treatment Options

There are several options for treatment facilities, ranging from hospitalization to outpatient programs. Many programs recommend clients undergo a continuum of care, starting with a more intensive program and then stepping down through the lower levels, including aftercare or extended care programs, to reduce the risk of relapse. When a person connects with a facility, they can discuss the available options to find the best fit for the situation. The length of addiction and intensity of the problem dictates the best option. A recovery concierge or other worker can help to designate the right level and type of treatment to ensure the best chance at recovery.

Hospitalization is the most intensive form of treatment. A person usually only stays in a hospital for a shorter period of time, until they are stable enough to move to a residential rehab facility. They may just go through detox in a hospital, or they may also be involved in some of the other threaten programs, depending on the situation and the facility. Some places offer partial hospitalization, where a person remains at home during the night, but comes in for intensive programming during the day.

Residential rehab is similar to hospitalization, as a person remains on site 24/7 and has continuous care. However, residential rehab takes place in dedicated facilities for addiction treatment, and it often offers a more comfortable environment. It also offers a situation closer to a person's home life, which can help a person learn to transition back to their normal life without drugs and alcohol.

Intensive outpatient program is one that occurs for about 10 to 15 hours a week. A person can remain living at home and working while undergoing treatment. It is a good compromise between the more intensive residential programs and being able to continue working, or taking care of other responsibilities.

Some people are able to successfully recover through just participating in weekly psychotherapy programs and enrolling in support groups, such as Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous. However, most people get the best support from a more intensive treatment.

Some rehab facilities offer specialized services or treatment programs. For example, some might have gender specific programs, such as women only treatment facilities. Others might have a stronger emphasis on spirituality, such as a program run by a particular religious organization. Some programs offer extra support for the GBLT community. Others involve the family to facilitate the healing of familial relationships. There are also dual diagnosis facilities, which treat co-occurring conditions, such as drug or alcohol addiction and a mental health disorder. You can also find executive programs, which offer a luxurious situation where a person will have the amenities to continue to work while in rehab. Many programs also offer custom services, such as in home detox.

How to Know When to Seek Help

Denial can be one of the most significant hurdles to treatment. Unless a person decides there is a problem and he or she wants to change, he or she will often struggle and continually relapse. It is a myth that a person must hit rock bottom, having lost everything, including a job, family, friends, and more. The earlier a person enters treatment, the better. There are a few important red flags of abuse or addiction that demonstrate a person should seek some kind of treatment for his or her problem.

Each substance has its own unique symptoms of abuse or addiction, but there are common behaviors that signal a person might have a problem. These include:

  1. Tolerance to the substance
  2. Withdrawal symptoms when the substance is not consumed
  3. Craving or compulsion to use the substance
  4. Failing to stop using the substance
  5. Engaging in dangerous behavior to procure the substance
  6. Trouble with the law
  7. Problems with work, school, or relationships
  8. Isolating behavior
  9. No longer enjoying favorite activities
  10. Stealing in order to get the substance
  11. Lying about the consumption of a person
  12. Secretive behavior
  13. Mood swings
  14. Changes in appetite or weight
  15. Problems with sleeping, such as insomnia

If a person has a problem, but struggles to admit to it, an intervention could help him or her to get the help he or she needs. An intervention is a planned meeting with a small group of family and friends that provides a forum for discussing troublesome behavioral patterns. It ends with making the addict decide between entering a treatment program and dealing with a set of specific consequences. Before an intervention, the planning team must research and set up the treatment program. A recovery concierge can help to arrange the treatment for the person, as well as assist with planning the intervention, including finding an interventionist. Although a professional interventionist is not necessary, it can help to ensure the intervention goes well.