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  • Why Escapism is So Attractive to Addicts

    Why Escapism is So Attractive to Addicts

    There are a myriad of factors that can contribute to the development of addiction and some of them are unavoidable such as genetic and psychological vulnerability. However, one of the reasons people begin to drink or use drugs is that their substance abuse serves as a method of escape from reality.

  • Is There Such A Thing As 'Managing Your Drug Use' As An Addict?

    Is There Such A Thing As 'Managing Your Drug Use' As An Addict?

    Addiction is a complex problem of physical and psychological dependence that seems to affect only certain individuals who are vulnerable. For many people who are not vulnerable to addiction, it is possible for them to have minimal contact with drugs or alcohol without losing control and being unable to stop.

  • The Risks of Prescription Treatment for Drug Addiction

    The Risks of Prescription Treatment for Drug Addiction

    Traditional methods of treating alcohol or drug addiction usually take place in recovery programs that focus on psychosocial treatment. Addiction treatment has evolved over time and the most common approaches involve detoxification and abstinence, individual and group counseling and, in many cases, a twelve step or other form of support group.

  • A True Definition of Relapse

    A True Definition of Relapse

    Addiction is a disease that stays with a person for life and is never fully cured but only managed as best as possible. That is why relapse is such a common issue that addicts have to be aware of at all times when they are getting through the initial phases of recovery.

  • Is Mixing Methadone With Other Substances Recovery Russian Roulette?

    Is Mixing Methadone With Other Substances Recovery Russian Roulette?

    One of the available treatments for people suffering from opoid addiction is the use of methadone, a prescription medication that has been in use since the 60s. Using methadone as a means to recover from heroin or painkiller addiction remains a controversial subject because of the many risks involved in using medication as a replacement drug.

  • The Link Between PTSD and Drug Addiction

    The Link Between PTSD and Drug Addiction

    Post traumatic stress disorder and drug addiction have a high rate of comorbitity, which means occurring at the same time. In Vietnam veterans, between 60 to 80 percent of those seeking treatment for PTSD also meet the criteria for substance abuse. In the general population, around 30 percent of PTSD sufferers develop drug dependence, and 50 percent develop alcohol dependence.

  • Why Teen Culture Is Driven By Drug Use

    Why Teen Culture Is Driven By Drug Use

    Teenagers have long had a reputation of using and abusing drugs. Certain elements of youth culture seem to be driven by drug use. However, the relationship is actually more cyclical, where teen culture both drives and is driven by drug use.

  • Mutated Worm Fights Alcohol Intoxication

    Mutated Worm Fights Alcohol Intoxication

    New research has discovered a certain mutated species of worm that could prove instrumental in the fight against alcoholism. Scientists at the University of Texas in Austin have discovered that by inserting a "modified human alcohol target" into the worm they are able to make it immune to the intoxicating effects of alcohol.

  • Shia LeBeouf Reaches Out For Help with Alcoholism

    Shia LeBeouf Reaches Out For Help with Alcoholism

    The star of the popular film "Transformers", Shia LeBeouf has admitted that he is receiving treatment for alcohol abuse although he has not yet entered a rehab facility. In spite of false reports stating that the actor entered rehabilitation, LeBeouf's representatives have stated that he is receiving treatment for alcohol abuse but not through an inpatient treatment center.

  • Naloxone Hydrochloride Approved: Relieves Pain And Is Harder To Abuse

    Naloxone Hydrochloride Approved: Relieves Pain And Is Harder To Abuse

    Prescription pain medication is one of the most widely abused substances in America, third behind alcohol and marijuana. About 4.8 million Americans have abused pain medication in the past month, according to the latest data from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

  • NHL's Rich Clune Talks Alcoholism and His Sobriety

    NHL's Rich Clune Talks Alcoholism and His Sobriety

    Hockey star, Rich Clune of the Nashville Predators has recently opened up about his recovery from alcoholism and how it changed his life for the better. Clune is one of the few NHL players to admit to his alcohol problem while still in the league and although a controversial confession he wants to get the word out about recovering from alcoholism.

  • Can Treating Patients While Hospitalized Increase Success Rate For Recovery?

    Can Treating Patients While Hospitalized Increase Success Rate For Recovery?

    There is no question that one of the most significant events that can lead an addict to seek sobriety is hitting "rock bottom,". Rock bottom refers to the point in time when an addict's addiction causes some kind of event or condition that is so severe that an addict realizes they they must seek help if they are going to continue to live. Hitting rock bottom is generally a very unpleasant and scary place, but for many addicts, this is the only way to get some clarity about the importance of seeking help.

  • Does Senator Markey's Plan Help Or Hurt Heroin Addicts?

    Does Senator Markey's Plan Help Or Hurt Heroin Addicts?

    Heroin addiction is a growing problem in America. Many experts believe that the cause of the rise in addiction is due to an increase in prescription medication abuse. The second most commonly abused illicit drug, behind marijuana, is prescription medication, especially prescription opioid pain medication.

  • How To Get Off Suboxone

    How To Get Off Suboxone

    Recovering from heroin is no easy feat. Heroin is an extremely addictive and powerful drug, and when an addict stops using, they very frequently experience symptoms that are highly unpleasant. These symptoms, known as withdrawal symptoms, occur because the brains' reward centers send messages to the brain to trigger unpleasant sensations when the brain does not receive the substance they are addicted to.

  • The Process Of Rapid Detox With Naltrexone

    The Process Of Rapid Detox With Naltrexone

    One of the first and most important steps any addict must take when they are prepared to get clean and sober is to detox from the drug that they are addicted to. The process of detoxing is generally very physically uncomfortable and leads to what is known as withdrawal symptoms.

  • Is Silicon Valley Slipping Into A Drug Fueled Work Culture?

    Is Silicon Valley Slipping Into A Drug Fueled Work Culture?

    There are few sectors of the economy that are growing as quickly and enjoying more profits than in Silicon Valley. Silicon Valley, the "motherland" of the tech industry is an area that is notable for not only the large numbers of majorly profitable developments that emerge from it, but also because of the fact that so many of the men and women benefitting from the tech boom are very young and very ambitious.

  • Recovery Community Starting To Show Up In Force At Music Festivals

    Recovery Community Starting To Show Up In Force At Music Festivals

    Music festivals have long been a mainstay of American popular culture. They offer a great way for music lovers to see some of their favorite artists all at one event. The festivals also boast a wonderful chance for music lovers from all walks of life to meet other people with similar tastes and to enjoy the experience of listening to music in a beautiful outdoor setting.

  • The Cognitive Recovery of an Alcoholic

    The Cognitive Recovery of an Alcoholic

    Excessive alcohol consumption over a long period of time is known to cause significant brain damage and even cognitive illnesses such as dementia. People that suffer from alcoholism tend to experience the worst consequences of alcohol on the brain and may show serious cognitive impairment.

  • Does Kombucha Present a Threat To Alcoholics In Recovery?

    Does Kombucha Present a Threat To Alcoholics In Recovery?

    Kombucha is a beverage that has grown in popularity over the last several years. Hailed by many as a health miracle, kombucha is a probiotic that is made of fermented mushrooms. Many people regularly drink the beverage as part of a health regimen because of the fact that it may aid in digestion and help with things like headaches and skin clarity.

  • The Stages of Recovery for an Alcoholic

    The Stages of Recovery for an Alcoholic

    Once a person struggling with addiction makes the decision to enter recovery, they must face a long and often difficult journey. Recovery does not happen overnight and everyone experiences the process differently depending on their background and the severity of addiction.

  • Breaking Down Gender Specific Challenges for Women in Addiction Treatment

    Breaking Down Gender Specific Challenges for Women in Addiction Treatment

    Women and men are different in more than just biological ways. The differences between men and women can affect the way they communicate and connect with one another. Because women have certain psychological differences than men, their specific needs can bring up issues when they are receiving addiction treatment.

  • Where to Turn When Your Solution of Alcohol Stops Working

    Where to Turn When Your Solution of Alcohol Stops Working

    When life gets overwhelming people often look to drinking as their stress reliever and consume alcohol as an escape from their problems. Drinking becomes a cycle as they look for temporary relief but never quite resolve what is bothering them.

  • 5 Most Dangerous Places For A Person In Recovery

    5 Most Dangerous Places For A Person In Recovery

    Avoiding relapse can be difficult, especially during early recovery. When a person has undergone treatment for drug or alcohol abuse or addiction, then he or she should be careful about the environments in which he or she resides to avoid temptation and relapse.

  • British Think Tank Proposing Alcohol Tax Dedicated to Funding Rehab

    British Think Tank Proposing Alcohol Tax Dedicated to Funding Rehab

    Alcohol abuse and addiction is a serious problem around the world, and alcohol causes 3.3 million deaths every year around the world. Alcohol is not the only substance abuse problem, with about 15.3 million people suffering from drug use disorders around the world.

  • The Correlation of Alcohol Abuse and Depression

    The Correlation of Alcohol Abuse and Depression

    Alcoholism is a disease that is complex and often difficult to treat because of the fact that it can have so many causes. When a person is addicted to alcohol, their brain's reward center becomes so accustomed to receiving the pleasurable feelings associated with consuming alcohol that the brain becomes entirely fixated on drinking.

  • Changing Denial Into Rational Thought

    Changing Denial Into Rational Thought

    Denial is one of the biggest impediments to overcoming addiction. In order to seek treatment, a person must admit that there is a problem. Too often, drug addicts and alcoholics get stuck believing that they do not have a problem; that they can stop any time they want, rather than recognizing that they need help to overcome a drinking or drug abuse problem.

  • 5 Truths Learned In Treatment

    5 Truths Learned In Treatment

    Many of the elements of an addiction treatment program focus on looking inwards to learn more about oneself. Therefore, when you undergo a treatment programs, you typically learn important truths about yourself, and life.

  • 5 Truths Learned In Treatment

    5 Truths Learned In Treatment

    Many of the elements of an addiction treatment program focus on looking inwards to learn more about oneself. Therefore, when you undergo a treatment programs, you typically learn important truths about yourself, and life.

  • The Truth about the Difficulties of Teen Sobriety

    The Truth about the Difficulties of Teen Sobriety

     Adolescence is the period of time when children under the age of 18 are most likely to start experimenting with drugs or alcohol. Although parents may encourage young teens to stay sober, it may be hard for them to avoid temptation in their social environment.

  • My Chemical Romance Frontman Gerard Way Talks Openly About His Relapse

    My Chemical Romance Frontman Gerard Way Talks Openly About His Relapse

    Rock stars and musicians are infamous for having drug and alcohol problems, which is one of the reasons behind the famous mantra "sex, drugs and rock and roll." However, musicians are not the only celebrities to make headlines due to their drug or alcohol abuse, a stint in rehab, or even a death caused by drugs or alcohol.

  • 5 Ways To Avoid Depression In Recovery

    5 Ways To Avoid Depression In Recovery

    It is not uncommon for people recovering from addiction to deal with some symptoms of depression and anxiety as they go through the early phases of rehab. In a lot of cases, substance abuse becomes a way for an addict to escape from existing problems with depression and abstaining from alcohol and drug use can make their symptoms come back worse than ever before.

  • Can Binge Drinking Be Reduced By Stringent Alcohol Laws?

    Can Binge Drinking Be Reduced By Stringent Alcohol Laws?

    Alcohol abuse is a serious problem that poses a very real threat to minors each year. Annually, 4,300 minors die from alcohol related causes, and countless others suffer serious injury or other major problems as a result of their excessive drinking.

Recovery Concierge

Drug and alcohol abuse often has a reputation as a problem that only affects inner city and unemployed populations. However, anyone of any class, race, gender, socioeconomic level, employment status, and geographic location can develop a problem with drugs or alcohol. In fact, the level of drug use, especially prescription drug abuse, among a white, suburban and higher socioeconomic class has risen exponentially in the past decade.

Many addicts are afraid to go to rehab, and believe it is a shameful experience. However, entering rehab is actually a powerful action. It means that a person is taking control of his or her life and striving to make positive changes. Another common assumption is that the facilities are uncomfortable and grim, except for celebrities. However, there are several rehab facilities that offer programs with luxurious accommodations and extra amenities to make the stay almost feel like home, or a stay at a four star hotel, that are surprisingly affordable and accessible. Some programs also offer a recovery concierge to ensure that clients receive the best care possible, and to help custom build the treatment program to the unique situation.

Substance abuse is a unique problem that develops differently in each individual, so the treatment program should adapt to the person and his or her situation rather than the substance of abuse. There are many programs available in luxury treatment programs that focus on a holistic approach customized to the person, instead of a cookie cutter approach to rehab. These programs offer many services in addition to the standard alcohol and drug addiction treatment program.

Despite the war on drugs, substance abuse and addiction remains a significant problem in America across all demographics. According to the Results from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, the latest data available from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), 124 million Americans (48 percent) have taken illicit drugs at some point in their lifetime, 42 million (16 percent) have taken them in the past year, and 23 million (9.2 percent) have used in the past month.

The most commonly abused illicit drug is marijuana; around 111 million people (42.8 percent) have consumed marijuana in their lifetime, 31 million (12.1 percent) have used it in the past year, and 18.8 million (7.3 percent) have in the past month. The second most commonly abused illicit drug is non-medical use of prescription medication, with 54 million people (20.9 percent) having used prescription medication in their lifetime, 16.6 million (6.4 percent) in the past year, and 6.8 million (2.6 percent) in the past month. 

Not everyone who has used illicit drugs become addicted or regularly abuses the substances. About 7 million people meet the criteria for dependence or abuse, which is 2.8 percent of the population. However, only 19.1 percent of people, or 1.5 million, actually receive the necessary treatment. 

Alcohol is the most commonly abused substance, with 214 million Americans (82.3 percent) have consumed it at some point in their lifetime, 173 million (66.7 percent) have consumed alcohol in the past year, and 135 million (52.1 percent) have drank alcohol in the past month. Many of the people who consume alcohol, even within the past month, drink moderate amounts and do not have a problem. However, there are still many people who problem drink. Around 59 million people (6.2 percent) have engaged in binge drinking in the past month and 17 million (6.5 percent) have engage din heavy drinking. These behavior patterns put people at risk of developing a substance abuse problem. About 18.2 million people meet the criteria for needing treatment for alcohol, but only 8.2 percent actually receive it.

Drug and alcohol abuse and addiction happens across all demographics. Although many people consider substance abuse to be a more significant problem among minorities, the highest numbers of users are actually white, with 87.5 million (51.6 percent) white Americans having had illicit drugs at some point in their lives, 27 million (15.9 percent) in the past year and 15.6 million (9.2 percent) in the past month. In comparison, the numbers for African Americans are 14.2 million (46.5 percent) having used in the lifetime, 5.7 million (18.7 percent) in the past year, and 3.4 million (11.3 percent) in the past month. For Hispanic populations, the numbers are 16.4 million (40.8 percent) having used in their lifetime, 6.3 million (15.7 percent) in the past year, and 3.3 million (8.3 percent) in the past month. For dependency, 4.5 million white people meet the criteria, compared to 1.2 million African Americans and 1.1 million Latinos.

For alcohol, the numbers are closer between the different races. In the white population, 87.1 percent have used alcohol in their lifetime, 76.1 percent of African Americans have, and 73.9 percent of Hispanics have. The numbers are slightly different for past year use, with 71.5 percent of whites, 59.6 percent of African Americans, and 57.8 percent of Hispanics having consumed alcohol in the past year. In the past month, 57.4 percent of whites, 43.2 percent of African Americans, and 41.8 percent of Hispanics have consumed alcohol.

There is a difference between men and women as well. Men have a higher rate of both alcohol and drug use than women. About 11.6 percent of men currently use illicit drugs, compared to 6.9 percent of women. About 56.5 percent of men and 47.9 percent of women are current drinkers. 

Many people assume that drug addicts are typically unemployed. Although unemployed people have a higher rate of current illicit drug use (18.1 percent compared to 8.9 percent for full time workers and 12.5 percent for part time), the number of current users is actually higher in those who are employed. Out of the 21.5 million current illicit drug users, 14.6 million or 67.9 percent were employed either full or part time.

More employed people drink than unemployed. For those who currently drink alcohol, 64.8 percent are employed full time, compared to 54.9 percent who are unemployed. Even those who binge drink are more commonly employed. About 75 percent of those who were binge drinkers were employed, and 74 percent of heavy drinkers were also employed.

Many people who meet the criteria for dependency are employed. About 16.9 percent of unemployed people meet the criteria for dependency or abuse, compared to 9.1 percent full time workers and 10.3 percent part time. However, the majority (51.9 percent) of those who were dependent on a substance are employed full time.

What is a Recovery Concierge?

A recovery concierge may have many different functions, as well as different names, depending on the facility to which he or she is associated. The term is derived from the word concierge, which has two similar definitions. One is a caretaker of a small hotel or apartment complex who lives on the grounds, and the other is a hotel employee who assists guests by arranging what is needed, such as making theater and restaurant reservations or arranging tours.

In recovery, the concierge acts similarly by working one-on-one with the client to ensure that the treatment program is tailor made to the individual situation and needs. They will work with the individual, and the family if appropriate, to ensure all the needs are met.

Typical Concierge Services

Recovery concierge might handle many different services within a facility, and there might be more than one person handling the various facets of the job. The facility might offer a variety of services, such as nanny services, chauffeuring, spa services, exercise and spa opportunities, group meetings, life coaching, travel arrangements, and more. The concierge will work with the client to schedule these various services and arrange for transportation, if necessary. Not every treatment facility will have an onsite concierge, but many will still offer customized treatment options and a personal experience.

Treatment for Addiction

The majority of people with an addition to drugs or alcohol do not seek treatment. There are many reasons for this, including lack of insurance and funds, but the main reason is denial of a problem. A person does not have to hit rock bottom to benefit from receiving treatment. In fact, the earlier a person undergoes treatment, the better chance he or she has with recovery, and a lower risk of relapse. There are many different options for treatment modalities to help a person overcome substance abuse or addiction. Many treatment facilities focus on a holistic approach, so they offer several of these methods, including psychotherapy, group sessions, detox services, medication, and lifestyle and behavioral changes.

A relationship concierge, or the equivalent, will go over the treatment options with a client to help create the ideal treatment program, with the guidance of the psychologists, psychiatrists, and other recovery professionals on staff.

Psychotherapy is one of the essential components of addiction treatment. Many people turn to drugs or alcohol to self-medicate a mental health disorder, or to numb strong negative emotions and feelings. Additionally, many people use mood-altering substances as a form of stress-relief. By relying on these substances, a person has a higher risk of developing a dependency upon the substance. Without understanding the underlying reasons for the abuse, a person will not be able to overcome the problem. He or she will still encounter the issues, but will be ill-equipped to manage them. The most common form of therapy for addiction is cognitive behavioral therapy. This provides a way for a person to understand the behavior and issues fueling the decision to drink or use drugs, and replace those actions with healthier alternatives.

Many treatment facilities offer group psychotherapy sessions. These often teach important life skills necessary for overcoming addiction, including coping mechanisms, healthy stress relief techniques, anger management, how to overcome body image or self-esteem issues, family and relationship therapy, and more. By engaging in these group sessions, people gain support from other individuals who have undergone similar experiences as them. This facilitates and complements many of the problems that individual psychotherapy covers. Facilities often offer several group sessions every day, led by a certified counselor or therapist, which allows them to provide a more intensive treatment. Individual psychotherapy, even in a rehab facility, often only occurs a few times a week at most. By integrating group therapy, a facility can offer a wider range of help for the clients.

The first step for any treatment program is detox. There are several different options for detox, including natural or medically assisted. The type of detox that works best for a person depends on the substance or substances of choice, the length of abuse or addiction, and the current health of a person.

Medically assisted detox includes using medication that acts similarly to addictive substances to wean a person off of the drug while minimizing withdrawal symptoms. Common drugs include methadone, benzodiazepines, and buprenorphine.

Natural detox means undergoing detox without the use of medication. Some programs use vitamins and supplements, and possibly even diet and saunas, to help the body naturally detox itself. A new program uses an IV drip infused with high quantities of essential vitamins and minerals, along with NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), to stimulate the body's own recovery, while minimizing the effects of withdraw.

A person can undergo detox at a hospital setting, a residential detox facility, or at home as an outpatient. Some recovery facilities also offer customized in home detox services that have more personalized treatment than standard outpatient programs. If a person is at high risk of medical complications, then a hospital setting is best. Alcohol detox is the most dangerous and should almost always be done under some form of medical supervision.

Within treatment services, some places also use medication to facilitate the treatment once detox is over. In the case of opiate addiction, this might be continuing methadone or buprenorphine for an extended period of time. For alcohol abuse and addiction, this could include disulfiram (Antabuse), naltrexone (ReVia, Vivitrol), or acamprosate (Campral).

If a person has any medical conditions or mental health disorders, they may be prescribed medication to help recover from these conditions. A treatment facility will have someone manage the medication to ensure that no further abuse is done.

A comprehensive approach to addiction treatment must include lifestyle and behavioral changes. Many people become addicted to drugs or alcohol due to mental or emotional problems, or undue stress. By teaching how to exchange the unhealthy behavioral patterns with healthy ones, a person can learn to manage these behaviors. Examples of lifestyle skills include mindfulness activities, yoga, meditation, and tai chi. Exercise has been shown to help with recovery, so many programs offer gyms on site or access to fitness centers. Additionally, some programs include acupuncture or massage therapy. Programs might offer a nutritionist or dietician to create healthy meals that facilitate the body's recovery from drugs and alcohol, as well as teach healthy eating options and meal plans to help a person implement it in their own life.

Many of the lifestyle options taught to patients are meant to provide a healthy alternative to drinking and doing drugs, as well as be something they can take home and continue to do. Many of them have been proven to help with recovery.

Complimentary alternative therapies may also be included, such as music therapy, art therapy or equine therapy. These provide alternative ways to manage emotional trauma and stress, often without the need for verbal discussion. It often complements talk therapy, especially for those who have difficulty voicing their underlying problems and issues.

The recovery concierge will talk with clients about the various offerings, and make any necessary arrangements.

Treatment Options

There are several options for treatment facilities, ranging from hospitalization to outpatient programs. Many programs recommend clients undergo a continuum of care, starting with a more intensive program and then stepping down through the lower levels, including aftercare or extended care programs, to reduce the risk of relapse. When a person connects with a facility, they can discuss the available options to find the best fit for the situation. The length of addiction and intensity of the problem dictates the best option. A recovery concierge or other worker can help to designate the right level and type of treatment to ensure the best chance at recovery.

Hospitalization is the most intensive form of treatment. A person usually only stays in a hospital for a shorter period of time, until they are stable enough to move to a residential rehab facility. They may just go through detox in a hospital, or they may also be involved in some of the other threaten programs, depending on the situation and the facility. Some places offer partial hospitalization, where a person remains at home during the night, but comes in for intensive programming during the day.

Residential rehab is similar to hospitalization, as a person remains on site 24/7 and has continuous care. However, residential rehab takes place in dedicated facilities for addiction treatment, and it often offers a more comfortable environment. It also offers a situation closer to a person's home life, which can help a person learn to transition back to their normal life without drugs and alcohol.

Intensive outpatient program is one that occurs for about 10 to 15 hours a week. A person can remain living at home and working while undergoing treatment. It is a good compromise between the more intensive residential programs and being able to continue working, or taking care of other responsibilities.

Some people are able to successfully recover through just participating in weekly psychotherapy programs and enrolling in support groups, such as Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous. However, most people get the best support from a more intensive treatment.

Some rehab facilities offer specialized services or treatment programs. For example, some might have gender specific programs, such as women only treatment facilities. Others might have a stronger emphasis on spirituality, such as a program run by a particular religious organization. Some programs offer extra support for the GBLT community. Others involve the family to facilitate the healing of familial relationships. There are also dual diagnosis facilities, which treat co-occurring conditions, such as drug or alcohol addiction and a mental health disorder. You can also find executive programs, which offer a luxurious situation where a person will have the amenities to continue to work while in rehab. Many programs also offer custom services, such as in home detox.

How to Know When to Seek Help

Denial can be one of the most significant hurdles to treatment. Unless a person decides there is a problem and he or she wants to change, he or she will often struggle and continually relapse. It is a myth that a person must hit rock bottom, having lost everything, including a job, family, friends, and more. The earlier a person enters treatment, the better. There are a few important red flags of abuse or addiction that demonstrate a person should seek some kind of treatment for his or her problem.

Each substance has its own unique symptoms of abuse or addiction, but there are common behaviors that signal a person might have a problem. These include:

  1. Tolerance to the substance
  2. Withdrawal symptoms when the substance is not consumed
  3. Craving or compulsion to use the substance
  4. Failing to stop using the substance
  5. Engaging in dangerous behavior to procure the substance
  6. Trouble with the law
  7. Problems with work, school, or relationships
  8. Isolating behavior
  9. No longer enjoying favorite activities
  10. Stealing in order to get the substance
  11. Lying about the consumption of a person
  12. Secretive behavior
  13. Mood swings
  14. Changes in appetite or weight
  15. Problems with sleeping, such as insomnia

If a person has a problem, but struggles to admit to it, an intervention could help him or her to get the help he or she needs. An intervention is a planned meeting with a small group of family and friends that provides a forum for discussing troublesome behavioral patterns. It ends with making the addict decide between entering a treatment program and dealing with a set of specific consequences. Before an intervention, the planning team must research and set up the treatment program. A recovery concierge can help to arrange the treatment for the person, as well as assist with planning the intervention, including finding an interventionist. Although a professional interventionist is not necessary, it can help to ensure the intervention goes well.