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  • What Makes A Grateful Alcoholic?

    What Makes A Grateful Alcoholic?

    Recovering from alcohol addiction is by no means an easy process. Recovery is a life long process, and any recovering alcoholic knows that in order to stay healthy and sober it is necessary to constantly use the tools that they developed in treatment in order to fight the urges and triggers that are simply a reality in day to day life.

  • 4 Ways To Help The Most Desperate Addict

    4 Ways To Help The Most Desperate Addict

    Addiction is a disease that can be extremely difficult to recover from. When a person is addicted to drugs or alcohol, they are very likely to also suffer from conditions like depression and low self esteem, which can make it even more difficult to make the decision to seek help because an addict may not recognize their own self worth or realize that they deserve the chance to be happy and healthy again.

  • 5 Truths Of Addiction Treatment

    5 Truths Of Addiction Treatment

    When it comes time for someone to get off of an addiction and end the vicious cycle that it brings on, the best way to get started with this is to first go into a detox facility. In detox, the physical addiction will be remedied through the help of medications and care from the individuals who work there.

  • Buprenorphine A New Option For Heroin Addiction Treatment

    Buprenorphine A New Option For Heroin Addiction Treatment

    Opiate withdrawal is usually so intense that addicts find it hard to quit heroin or pain killers without the help of some kind of medication. In many cases, methadone has proven to be problematic as a medication for heroin addiction because it can become addictive.

  • Military Vets Susceptible to Prescription Drug Addiction

    Military Vets Susceptible to Prescription Drug Addiction

    Soldiers who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan have a high risk of facing issues with drug abuse when they return home. It is common for military veterans to experience symptoms of PTSD or post-traumatic stress disorder, along with chronic pain due to combat injuries.

  • NYPD Now Equipped With Naloxone to Help Fight Heroin Deaths

    NYPD Now Equipped With Naloxone to Help Fight Heroin Deaths

    A new program has provided the necessary funds for New York Police officers to be equipped with a heroin antidote known as Naloxone. Recent increases in heroin addiction and overdose in the area have made it necessary for the NYPD to be specially trained and equipped for this crisis.

  • 5 Things You Should Know about Xanax

    5 Things You Should Know about Xanax

    Physicians frequently prescribe drugs like Xanax for people with panic disorder or symptoms of anxiety. Although it can be an effective medication for those suffering from panic attacks and severe anxiety, Xanax is a drug that is commonly abused.

  • Chasing the Dream of Doing Cocaine Like A Gentleman

    Chasing the Dream of Doing Cocaine Like A Gentleman

    Drugs like cocaine are often considered to be a "gentleman's addiction". Cocaine is the type of drug that is expensive enough to be associated with high flying executives and high profile celebrities who can afford to make it a habit. Because of this image cocaine sometimes becomes glamorized by people who imagine that doing this drug makes you appear rich and powerful.

  • Is Treating Opioid Addiction With Suboxone A Safe Option?

    Is Treating Opioid Addiction With Suboxone A Safe Option?

    Physicians treating addiction to heroin or prescription opoids are usually able to see a better success rate when providing medication. Recovering from the abuse of a highly addictive drug like heroin can be too difficult for long time users who are attempting to quit "cold turkey".

  • Is Crack-Cocaine the Most Destructive Drug Ever?

    Is Crack-Cocaine the Most Destructive Drug Ever?

    Most illegal drugs can have devastating effects on individuals and communities that see a high rate of addiction, but crack-cocaine is a particularly destructive substance that is dangerously addictive. When crack was widespread in the 80s and early 1990s, it destroyed many inner city communities that are still recovering from its effects.

  • Teen Athletes More Predisposed To Prescription Drug Addiction

    Teen Athletes More Predisposed To Prescription Drug Addiction

    Recent studies have discovered that young teens participating in sports have a higher risk of developing an addiction to prescription drugs and especially opoid pain killers than those not involved in athletics. The issue is a much bigger problem for male teen athletes that are more likely to misuse prescription drugs than their female counterparts.

  • America’s Binge Drinking Problem

    America’s Binge Drinking Problem

    Excessive drinking is more common in the U.S. than we might realize as studies have shown a surprising amount of adults frequently binge on alcohol. As many as 38 million U.S. adults binge drink on a regular basis according to findings from a study by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

  • Suburban Opoid Problem Contributing to Heroin Addiction

    Suburban Opoid Problem Contributing to Heroin Addiction

    Heroin abuse is no longer a problem reserved for the inner city or the poorest neighborhoods; now the typical heroin addicts are young white teens and adults living in the suburbs. Part of the reason for this shift is the rise in prescription pain killer abuse which can be a gateway to heroin addiction.

  • The Major Symptoms of Percoset Use and Abuse

    The Major Symptoms of Percoset Use and Abuse

    Prescription drug abuse has been a problem for the U.S. since the 1990s and has nearly reached the point of a national crisis. Currently, there are seven million Americans who take prescription drugs for non-medical reasons and the majority of those are abusing pain killers.

  • Breast Cancer Tied to Alcohol Consumption

    Breast Cancer Tied to Alcohol Consumption

    Alcohol and especially chronic alcohol abuse is known to cause a myriad of health problems including cirrhosis of the liver and heart disease but few people realize how much of a connection there is between alcohol and certain types of cancer. Alcoholism is not traditionally considered a major cause of cancer but studies actually show a clear link to the disease especially in the case of breast cancer.

  • 5 Tips To Help A Heroin Addict Get Into Treatment

    5 Tips To Help A Heroin Addict Get Into Treatment

    Few things are as frustrating and terrifying as having a loved one who is suffering from heroin addiction. Most people are aware that heroin is highly addictive and that using heroin presents a number of very serious health risks.

  •  Is Teen Culture Now A Drug Fueled Culture?

    Is Teen Culture Now A Drug Fueled Culture?

    Almost every parent of a teen worries about their child getting involved with drugs or alcohol use. Teens have always been the population most prone to peer pressure that may lead to experimentation, and teens are also the people that may be most at risk for some of the dangers associated with drug or alcohol use.

  • South Africa Looking to Cut Down on Alcohol Advertisements

    South Africa Looking to Cut Down on Alcohol Advertisements

    The government of South Africa has made efforts to combat the nation’s significant problem with alcohol abuse by proposing a ban on liquor advertisements. The Control of Marketing of Alcohol Beverages bill that would ban alcohol ads throughout the country still remains under consideration with much debate as to the impact it would have on the community and the economy.

     

  • U.S. Senate Proposing New Bills To Fight Heroin Addiction

    U.S. Senate Proposing New Bills To Fight Heroin Addiction

    As heroin addiction and abuse continues to devastate both individuals in small cities and those in large metropolitan areas, many doctors and teachers and therapists are turning to law enforcement and government officials for answers as to what may be an effective means of minimizing and ultimately eliminating the use and abuse of this deadly drug.

  • The 5 Most Commonly Abused Prescription Drugs

    The 5 Most Commonly Abused Prescription Drugs

    There is little question that prescription drug use is on the rise in the United States. The rapid increase in the number of hospitalizations and and deaths related to prescription drug use and abuse has led many parents, doctors, and law enforcement agents to search for possible ways in which the tide of prescription drug addiction can be stemmed.

  • The Glamorous Side Of Cocaine Hides The True Effects

    The Glamorous Side Of Cocaine Hides The True Effects

    Cocaine is a very dangerous and addictive drug that carries with it a number of quite troubling side effects. Although many people are aware of the fact that cocaine is a dangerous drug, the drug is somewhat unique in that it carries with it a somewhat glamorous image.

  • Alcohol Not Being Sold At University Of Georgia Football Games

    Alcohol Not Being Sold At University Of Georgia Football Games

    The University of Georgia has recently implemented a new plan for designed to manage alcohol consumption and reduce the number of injuries and incidents caused by alcohol consumption at its football games with a new plan that has been coined the “Gameday Gameplan.”

  • How To Show Gratitude In Sobriety

    How To Show Gratitude In Sobriety

    The life that one lives under the tyranny of an addiction is one filled with stress, pain and isolation. Addictions are in no way beneficial to those who are in their grip, and for someone to get out of them they seem to have to have no other option.

  • How To Spot Prescription Drug Addiction

    How To Spot Prescription Drug Addiction

    Prescription drug addiction is fast becoming one of the most rapidly growing diseases in the country. Prescription drugs are highly habit forming and there is no such thing as a “typical” prescription drug addict.

  • 5 Facts You Need To Know About Heroin Withdrawal

    5 Facts You Need To Know About Heroin Withdrawal

    Heroin is one of the most addictive and destructive drugs out in the world today. If someone does not overdose from it, then they are sure to catch some kind of disease such as AIDS, HIV, or Hepatitis C from the fact that it is common for heroin users to share needles without cleaning them or getting new ones.

  • 5 Consequences Of Binge Drinking

    5 Consequences Of Binge Drinking

    Binge drinking is defined as any time that an individual drinks to excess or consumes enough alcohol to make them seriously impaired. What constitutes binge drinking may vary quite a bit from person to person, but it is generally agreed that the average man is said to have engaged in binge drinking if he has consumed more than five drinks in two hours and the average woman if she has had four or more.

  • 5 Facts About America’s Problem With Prescription Drug Addiction

    5 Facts About America’s Problem With Prescription Drug Addiction

    The rate of addiction to prescription painkillers across the United States throughout the population is greater nowadays than all illegal drug addictions combined. More people than ever are getting hooked onto things like prescription painkillers such as Dilaudid, OxyContin, Methadone and morphine

  • 5 Facts You Probably Did Not Know About Cocaine

    5 Facts You Probably Did Not Know About Cocaine

    When chewed, the leaf of the coca plant gives you a high. This is what cocaine comes from. It is found in Central America, and thousands of years ago, the ancient Aztecs and Incas used it to get their hearts racing and blood flowing as they lived in high mountain regions where the air is thin.

  • Overall Health Risks Of Teen Prescription Drug Abuse

    Overall Health Risks Of Teen Prescription Drug Abuse

    The abuse of prescription drugs in today’s world has risen to the levels of an epidemic. All told, the amount of people who abuse prescription drugs surpasses that of people who use every type of illegal street drug like meth, cocaine and heroin combined.

  • Is Cocaine the Ultimate Party Drug?

    Is Cocaine the Ultimate Party Drug?

    A drug like cocaine is often viewed by users as a recreational or party drug that they would prefer to use only on certain occasions. People look for a drug like cocaine to enhance their party experience because it is a stimulant that offers a short burst of intense energy and a feeling of euphoria.

  • Dangers Of Recreational Cocaine Use

    Dangers Of Recreational Cocaine Use

    Cocaine is one of the most addictive and dangerous substances out in the world of illicit substances today. Whether used on a daily basis or from time to time, the effects of cocaine on the body and on the mind can be extremely damaging.

  • What Today’s Heroin Addict Looks Like

    What Today’s Heroin Addict Looks Like

    When it comes to the heroin abuser, most people imagine someone who is destitute, maybe homeless, not necessarily of any specific ethnic background, and poor. 

  • Sum 41’s Deryck Whibley Finds His Bottom

    Sum 41’s Deryck Whibley Finds His Bottom

    The life of someone who is a famous musician can be a turbulent one. Everyone knows the cliche that is the "rockstar life", with heavy drug use and drinking, life on the road, promiscuity, so on and so forth.

  • Breaking Down Prescription Drug Addiction On A National Level

    Breaking Down Prescription Drug Addiction On A National Level

    The abuse of prescription drugs has become the biggest drug abuse problem in Western Culture today. It has been estimated that within the United States alone, more than 15 million people abuse prescription drugs- more than the combined number who reported abusing cocaine, hallucinogens, inhalants and heroin.

  • Energy Drinks And Alcohol A Deadly Combination

    Energy Drinks And Alcohol A Deadly Combination

    It seems every month there is a new type of drink coming out in the bars across the country. They are usually some new combination or hybrid of something mixed with alcohol for better taste or more potency.

OxyContin Addiction

While for most people, the idea of a dangerous drug brings to mind heroin, crack, and even methamphetamine, OxyContin is actually one of the deadliest and most addictive substances available. The fact that OxyContin is manmade and is accessible through a doctor’s prescription does not make it safer for human use than a drug like heroin. In fact, prescriptions for OxyContin are what have led to the majority of drug use progressing to abuse and onto addiction in the United States.

OxyContin: The Drug

OxyContin works as a painkiller by blocking messages to the brain alerting of discomfort or a problem somewhere in the human body. Because of its potential for abuse, its side effects, and its propensity for addiction, OxyContin’s composition and labeling were required to change, per the FDA. As a result, demand has decreased, but the drug is still extremely dangerous.

OxyContin, the brand name of Purdue Pharmaceuticals’ pill version of the painkiller, oxycodone, is a narcotic, just like heroin. Along with Vicodin, Percodan, Percocet, morphine, codeine, methadone and heroin, OxyContin and this entire classification of drugs, called opiates or opioids, have an extremely high rate of abuse, an even higher rate of addiction, and an undeniable link as the cause of thousands of overdose deaths every year.

What Does OxyContin Do?

OxyContin, created to mimic the effects of morphine, is comprised mainly of oxycodone. The drug works by blocking pain messengers in the brain, via the central nervous system. Internal levels of the natural neurotransmitter, dopamine, are affected, making the individual feel more pleasure and even euphoria, but the whole experience is chemically created. As a result, organic dopamine production is thrown out of whack, and the drug seems to be the only way to ever have a positive experience again.

Medicine

When used properly, as medically prescribed, OxyContin is a highly effective painkiller that relieves the suffering of cancer patients and those with major physical pain. In an effort to treat acute and chronic pain, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved OxyContin for medical use in 1995. Since its introduction to the medical community, OxyContin has quickly become one of the most addictive and most deadly drugs available. When taking more OxyContin than medically necessary, the drug produces a euphoric feeling, but that is never why a physician has recommended the drug for use.

Drug Formulation

The pill version of oxycodone was designed with a slow-release formula so that only the appropriate amount of medication makes its way into the user’s bloodstream at any given time. With this method, ongoing pain can be properly alleviated. However, the potential for ways to abuse OxyContin were realized almost immediately. Instead of just relieving pain, OxyContin users figured out how to manipulate the drug to also get high.

Statistics

OxyContin has been the subject of countless news reports and research studies. As the FDA witnessed the impact of OxyContin on the United States’ population, the organization began conducting research studies. Results, published in The Journal of the American Medical Association, announced that oxycodone-related deaths increased 93% and oxycodone-related emergency room visits increased 32% between 1997 and 1998.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released information that 15,000 Americans died of opiate and opioid related deaths in 2008, which marked a 300% increase from 1999. The rate of prescription pill deaths in one year was more than the total number of deaths linked to heroin and cocaine combined. Further, in 2008, Purdue Pharmaceuticals reported over $2 billion in annual OxyContin sales, nearly double the amount sold in 2007. The drug’s sales increased to nearly $3 billion the next year, and made it to $3.1 billion in 2010. This means that enough prescriptions for painkillers had been administered in 2010 to medicate every adult in the U.S., 24 hours a day, for an entire month.

Legal Involvement

After years of OxyContin sales, Purdue Pharmaceuticals was found liable for the drug’s addiction and death rates. The company entered a guilty plea to a single felony count of misbranding and paid out $600.5 million. Plus, three of the company’s top executives were each charged with misbranding misdemeanors and fined $34.5 million, which the company paid.

Changes to the Deadly Drug

As a result of the law suit, Purdue Pharmaceuticals reformulated OxyContin to reduce its abuse potential. Along with the changes came a new label warning of the drug’s side effects, dangers, and probability toward addiction. The combined changed have proven effective in decreasing the demand for OxyContin.

OxyContin: The Effects

The use of OxyContin affects the entire nervous system: the heart, the lungs, the brain, the reproductive, respiratory, digestive, and immune systems, and every major organ in the human body.

Unlike some other pharmaceutical drugs, the side effects of taking OxyContin are not mild. Instead of just possible dizziness and dry mouth, OxyContin affects the entire central nervous system. This means that the heart, the lungs, the brain, the reproductive, respiratory, digestive, and immune systems, and every major organ are impacted by the drug’s abuse.

As a result, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) reports record high cases of OxyContin abuse, physical and psychological dependence (i.e. addiction), and overdose deaths. Purdue Pharmaceuticals has been criticized for downplaying the dangers of OxyContin and has been required, by the FDA, to make changes to the label. The side effects are now listed right on the bottle of OxyContin along with what the FDA calls the strongest warning ever for a pharmaceutical drug.

Actual side effects of OxyContin use are:
  • Depressed respiration, or respiratory failure
  • Constipation
  • Lowered blood pressure
  • Slowed pulse
  • Confusion
  • Nausea, vomiting, or stomach cramps
  • Slurred speech
  • Lack of coordination
  • Inability to stay awake
  • Impairment of menstrual cycle in females
  • Severe withdrawal symptoms when drug use stops

Increased OxyContin Use

Similar to heroin, an increased tolerance to the pain-blocking euphoric effects leads an OxyContin user to want a larger dosage of the drug each day. Accidental OxyContin overdose is caused when a user does not stop increasing the dose, until one day, the amount of the drug is too much for the body to metabolize. Rarely does an OxyContin overdose result in an outcome other than death or permanent brain damage.

Stopping the Progression of OxyContin Use

The dangerous side effects of OxyContin make its use incredibly risky. If you are using OxyContin, or know someone who is, the behavior can stop with the right medical help. Recovery Now TV finds the treatment centers with the most experience and the best staff to help stop the progression of OxyContin use to abuse and addiction.

Under the guidance of medical doctors and substance abuse professionals, our team at Recovery Now TV has helped many opiate addicts get through medical detoxification and onto formal treatment. We work with licensed counselors who customize treatment plans, complete with tools for preventing dependence on OxyContin, skills for dealing with cravings for narcotics, lifelong coping skills to sustain a new life without substances.

Give Recovery Now TV a call today at 800-281-4731 to find out where you can start your new life.

OxyContin Abuse

Substance abuse, the step before addiction, consists of the continuation of any drug use despite its negative impact on the user’s life.

When a prescription drug is used in any way other than how a doctor prescribed it, the drug is being abused. The purpose is no longer proper pain treatment; the goal is to get high.

If a 90-day supply of OxyContin is deemed necessary for recovery after surgery, for example, and the individual uses the given quantity in 60 days, the drug has been abused. Similarly, when a portion of one’s personal quantity of OxyContin is sold to someone who does not also have a doctor’s prescription, the drug is being abused.

Although OxyContin was manufactured as a time-release pill, designed to relieve pain for up to 12 hours, when the drug is crushed and injected, snorted, chewed, smoked, or dissolved into a liquid, the time-release function is destroyed. Abusers feel a heroin-like rush from eating, drinking, snorting, or injecting the powdered, or pulverized, form of OxyContin.

The pleasurable feeling created by the abuse of OxyContin is leading even those who truly needed a prescription, to abuse the drug for the euphoria and the complete alleviation of all pain. Since the pharmaceutical drug can be so easily abused, often users quickly progress from legitimate use to abuse, and then onto addiction. Individuals who have not been educated on the dangers and side effects of OxyContin may not understand the drug’s powerful narcotic impact on the human body.

All too often, a person who has been prescribed OxyContin believes that the drug is safe because a doctor has deemed it medically appropriate. Sadly, the true effects of OxyContin abuse are widely unknown to most of the people who are taking the pharmaceutical. Consequently, OxyContin’s side effects become the reason for thousands of emergency room visits and causes of death every year.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), via the organization’s Drug Abuse Warning Network, emergency room incidents involving oxycodone increased 89% between 1993 and 1999. Those rates jumped another 68% from 1999 to 2000; illustrating the reality of the influence OxyContin abuse is having on our society.

As one of the most powerful pain relievers on the market, OxyContin became a substitute for heroin. Instead of injecting a risky street drug, individuals started going to a doctor, complaining of chronic pain, in an effort to get what is essentially the pill form of heroin. The pharmaceutical versions seem less dangerous than heroin, are perceived with less cultural stigma than “street drugs,” and come in a pretty little pill instead of via a needle, but make no mistake: prescription opiate narcotics are no less dangerous than any other version, like heroin, codeine, and morphine.

When the first high is experienced from OxyContin, abuse goes beyond just pain relief. The desire for an amount of the drug that creates that euphoric high is continuously pursued. For those users, who are not educated on the dangers of opiates, OxyContin use can unintentionally spiral out of control.

The body begins to change and chemicals in the brain begin to adapt to the continuous, and often rising, presence of OxyContin. The appropriate pain relief that used to come from one or two pills now requires five or six pills. As abuse continues to progress, it is not unusual for an individual to then need a dozen pills of OxyContin to feel the effect that used to come with just a couple. Physical tolerance to the drug has developed and the systems of the body and the brain now require more pills to ward off pain, or to get high.

When the body can no longer handle the dose that is being taken, meaning that the amount of the drug in the person’s system can no longer be metabolized, the drug becomes lethal. This is an overdose. The body does not distinguish between OxyContin, another pharmaceutical, and heroin when dosages become so high that breathing stops and other organs shut down, including the heart. OxyContin overdoses are just like heroin overdoses. The body cannot handle the level of narcotics present.

The good news is that complete recovery from any opiate is possible. With help from trained professionals, OxyContin abuse can stop before an overdose, or the progression to addiction, ends a life.

Recovery Now TV offers the latest in medical detoxification and effective therapeutic techniques for treating OxyContin abuse. Through effective referrals, our treatment team will help find the best detox and treatment program for you. Call Recovery Now TV to find out more: 800-281-4731.

OxyContin Addiction

Addiction includes:
  1. Loss of control over substance use
  2. Obsession with use
  3. Continued use despite adverse life consequences
  4. Denial that there is a problem with a substance
  5. A powerful likelihood of relapse

Addiction is defined as a chronic disease with a high probability of relapse. When a person fits the criteria of addiction, he or she can be diagnosed with physical and psychological dependence upon at least one mind-altering drug, or life-impairing behavior. The ability to stop using is diminished, and every aspect of the person’s life can reach incapacitation.

The use of OxyContin negatively impacts the entire central nervous system. The influence on the body and the brain decrease a person’s ability to make good choices. OxyContin addiction begins to affect relationships, commitments, and responsibilities, as the drug begins taking daily priority. When abuse crosses over into addiction, jobs are lost, schoolwork falls by the wayside, relationships crumble, families are torn apart, physical and mental health deteriorates, and even legal consequences can begin dictating a person’s life.

While this process can happen for any drug, the cycle of addiction is most difficult to break for opiates and opioids. The drugs in this classification alter brain chemistry as they relieve pain, and create a euphoric high when taken in higher doses than physically necessary. Without an intension of addiction, or even abuse of the drug, thousands of people find themselves fitting the criteria for OxyContin addiction.

A well-cited definition of addiction includes these five criteria:

  1. A Loss of Control over substance use;
  2. Obsession with substance use;
  3. Continued use Despite Negative Life Consequences;
  4. Denial of a problem with substances and/or behaviors; and,
  5. A powerful tendency to Relapse back to substance use.

When used in an example, a person who has become addicted to OxyContin is unable to stop taking pills on his or her own. Each day this person is obsessed with finding the drug and using it, and even after this behavior has caused adverse life consequences (i.e. loss of a job, complete financial devastation, or the end of an important relationship), OxyContin use continues.

Through all of this, the addict denies that there is a problem with OxyContin, sometimes in the some form of, “I need the drug to treat my chronic pain.” Denial is very powerful, and so is OxyContin. Even when use stops, whether the person admits a problem with the substance or not, someone who can be diagnosed with addiction returns to the drug, or relapses, often after just a short time of cessation.

Whether for you or for a loved one, this list provides signs and symptoms of addiction to look for in someone who is taking OxyContin:

  • Feeling physically sick when the supply of OxyContin is gone. (i.e. withdrawal symptoms)
  • Engaging in illegal activity to get OxyContin.
  • Increasing the amount of OxyContin taken each day. (i.e. increased tolerance)
  • Experiencing feelings of guilt or shame about OxyContin use.
  • Losing a job, failing out of school, or losing a loved one because of OxyContin use.
  • Changes in eating and sleeping patterns.
  • Mood swings.

Additionally, in an effort to feel a satiable high again, many opiate addicts will combine alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, and other pharmaceutical drugs with OxyContin. This signals drug addiction. The act of combining chemicals is extremely dangerous because drug interactions in your body are unpredictable, and therefore, high risk and often life-threatening. Via several famous opiate addicts, like Heath Ledger, Cory Monteith, and most recently, Philip Seymour Hoffman, we see just how easily prescription pills, heroin, and the mixture of several drugs can lead to an untimely death.

Instead of suffering through the life of addiction, break the cycle by calling Recovery Now TV. OxyContin addiction must be treated, and with the help of our team, you can begin the detox and recovery process today.

Recovery Now TV has helped hundreds of people overcome opiate and opioid addiction. With proven techniques and effective medical procedures, recovery begins with medically supervised detoxification. Once OxyContin is out of the body, rehab can begin where treatment plans are customized to each individual client and a wide variety of services are available to heal the mind, body, and soul.

Give Recovery Now TV a call today at 800- 281-4731 to explore your options and to treat your OxyContin addiction.

Withdrawal from OxyContin

OxyContin Withdrawal Symptoms:
  1. Muscle and bone pain
  2. Restlessness
  3. Diarrhea
  4. Insomnia
  5. Vomiting
  6. Cold flashes
  7. Involuntary leg movements

OxyContin withdrawal is no less serious than quitting heroin, despite the fact that OxyContin use may have started with a legitimate doctor prescription.

Opiate and opioid withdrawal indicators are physical symptoms experienced when the body reacts to a lack of any drug in the opiate family. The body and the brain have become accustomed to having a painkiller to function, so when a substance like OxyContin is suddenly taken away, pain seems excruciating, digestion is a major problem, and the entire central nervous system revolts. Muscles cramp, bones and joints ache, and the entire body sweats. Nausea, an inability to sleep or eat, and a relentless experience of anxiety also ensue. Overall, OxyContin withdrawal produces flu-like symptoms and major discomfort.

The pain and distress of OxyContin withdrawal can be minimized under proper medical supervision. Recovery Now TV has connections with monitored detoxification programs for opiate addiction.

OxyContin withdrawal is not a process you want to go through on you own. To stand a chance at making it through the first few days without returning to OxyContin use, seek participation in one of Recovery Now TV’s referrals with medical facilities, professional doctors, and licensed counselors helping you through the entire process.

Give us a call today at 800-281-4731 for a private consultation. We can help you stop using OxyContin and start a new life free of addiction.

Detox & Treatment

OxyContin addiction requires monitored detoxification and formal treatment. The team at Recovery Now TV is here to help you find the best program to fit all of your recovery needs. Call now, 800-281-4731.

Completely ridding the body of OxyContin is vital for any chance at recovery from opiate addiction. As the most addictive class of drugs, these substances are not easily forgotten. With the assistance of medical professionals, who can administer proper medications and can continuously monitor vital signs, detoxification can be completed with greater ease.

Participation in a detox program sets a former OxyContin addict up for entry into a formal inpatient opiate treatment program. With individual therapy, peer group processing, family therapy, and other proven therapeutic approaches to recovery, an OxyContin addict can make changes with a positive attitude and a readiness to change. While not easy, a substance free life is available to addicts everywhere.

Recovery Now TV has dealt with hundreds of clients with your exact symptoms. Our effective treatment referrals are based on experience and research. If you are addicted to OxyContin, or someone in your life cannot stop using an opiate, it is time for help.

To find out where you can receive the best in opiate and opioid treatment, contact our team at Recovery Now TV, 800-281-4731. Our professional staff is standing by to give you a confidential consultation.