Recovery Now News
  • 5 Things you need to know about effects of Opioid Withdrawals

    5 Things you need to know about effects of Opioid Withdrawals

    Abuse of prescription opioid painkillers can be a very dangerous addictive habit. Even if you avoid a life-threatening overdose, it can greatly harm your body, and develop a sense of tolerance and dependence that will leave you unable to function without it.

  • Identifying the Difference between Alcoholism and Problem Drinking

    Identifying the Difference between Alcoholism and Problem Drinking

    People may assume that anyone who drinks heavily is an alcoholic, but there are specific symptoms that can identify someone as an alcoholic rather than simply a problem drinker. Even though it may seem like problem drinking and alcoholism are really the same, there are distinct differences between the two and it is important know whether someone is an addict or just developing an unhealthy relationship with alcohol.

  • Canada Takes Unique approach to Combat Drug Addiction

    Canada Takes Unique approach to Combat Drug Addiction

    Traditional understandings of drug use and prevention have centered around discouraging use by punishing drug users, and educating people in ways that stigmatize users so experimentation would be discouraged. However, many of these efforts have been ineffective levels of drug use down.

  • Helping Those Who are Struggling in Early Recovery

    Helping Those Who are Struggling in Early Recovery

    Whether you are a long-time recovery veteran or you are still involved in your journey to sobriety, it can be beneficial to support and help others who are getting treatment for addiction. There are many resources available for people who are struggling with quitting their drug or alcohol use but some of the most helpful and lasting assistance can come from those who have been through it themselves.

  • Alcoholic Stigma Still is Deterrent for Professionals Who Need Treatment

    Alcoholic Stigma Still is Deterrent for Professionals Who Need Treatment

    Although there is plenty of help and support for alcoholics from all walks of life, there are still many individuals who might delay or avoid treatment because they worry about the stigma of addiction. This is especially the case for people in high profile careers or professional jobs that require them to maintain a certain image or reputation.

  • Handling Surgery and Pain Management in Recovery

    Handling Surgery and Pain Management in Recovery

    For a recovering addict, any type of substance can prove addictive because they have already shown an inability to exhibit self-control. People who are recovering from all types of addiction, whether it is alcohol, opiates or illegal drugs are told by specialists to stay away from all drugs in order to experience successful sobriety.

  • Know Your Rights: Taking Medical Leave for Opiate Recovery

    Know Your Rights: Taking Medical Leave for Opiate Recovery

    Recovery from opiate addiction can be a very painful process, and involve a lot of hard work. Addiction is an all-consuming condition that makes it impossible to live a full life, and so the recovery process is also going to be an all-consuming commitment to do whatever it takes to take care of yourself, weather out the storms of withdraw, and learn how to live a more healthy life.

  • Why Alcoholics Like to Isolate

    Why Alcoholics Like to Isolate

    For someone who likes to drink occasionally, it is usually when they are around friends or a crowd of people at a party. When it comes to alcoholics, however, they often like to drink in seclusion.

  • Why Anxiety and Depression are Prevalent in Opiate Use and Abuse

    Why Anxiety and Depression are Prevalent in Opiate Use and Abuse

    According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 9 million people both have a mental health issue and abuse drugs. Anxiety and depression are thus very strongly linked with abuse of drugs, presenting people in recovery with the challenge of treating two very different, overpowering conditions that both have to be dealt with in the recovery process.

  • ‘Downtown Divas’ is a NSFW look into the Eyes of Drug Addiction World Wide

    ‘Downtown Divas’ is a NSFW look into the Eyes of Drug Addiction World Wide

    In Downtown Divas, two artists, Loral Amir and Gigi Ben Artzi have strived to dispel this illusion of a seemingly glitzy life as a heroin addict. The artists have taken a series of striking and disturbing photos of heroin addicts who are also Russian prostitutes in very expensive designer clothes, and the results are thought provoking and gut wrenching.

  • 5 Tips on How to Stay Sober During the Holidays

    5 Tips on How to Stay Sober During the Holidays

    Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years can be challenging time when you are a recovering alcoholic. The holidays themselves and the many parties and get-togethers in between are sure to be filled with plenty of tempting kinds of wine, champagne and cocktails.

  • Use Contrary Action to Participate in Your Recovery

    Use Contrary Action to Participate in Your Recovery

    A concept that is used often in recovery circles is the idea of "contrary action" in fighting addictive impulses. Addicts can have overwhelming urges and thoughts that are self-destructive and lead down the path of dependency.

  • Positives and Negatives of Clonidine’s Use for Withdrawal Relief

    Positives and Negatives of Clonidine’s Use for Withdrawal Relief

    The high from drug use can often seem attractive in the moment, but can also cause less pleasant effects as you come down. Especially if they are used habitually over a long period of time, trying to stop substance abuse can often be a very painful process, as your body tried to adapt to going without something it had become dependent upon.

  • The Physical Consequences of DXM

    The Physical Consequences of DXM

    DXM is a drug that has grown in popularity among young people for a number of reasons. The chief reason for it popularity may be that it is found in a substance that many parents may be keeping in their home: cough syrup. Indeed, DXM is a psychoactive and highly dangerous drug that is contained in many formulas of common cough syrup.

  • 5 Ways Admitting You Have a Problem Can Change Your Life

    5 Ways Admitting You Have a Problem Can Change Your Life

    Recovering from an addiction is a long journey and the first step is admitting to yourself and others that you have a problem. Even this first step can be one of the hardest to accomplish because it means you are finally breaking through the deception and denial that could have gone on for years.

  • 5 Ways You May Be Self-Medicating

    5 Ways You May Be Self-Medicating

    When people suffer from anxiety or depression and are not getting proper treatment from psychotherapy or medication they often develop their own ways of dealing with the symptoms. Because treatment can be costly and time-consuming, those suffering from depression may take matters into their own hands without understanding the consequences of delaying professional help.

  • Elton John Helps Lady Gaga Kick Drug Addiction

    Elton John Helps Lady Gaga Kick Drug Addiction

    The singer has been open about her drug use during past interviews, saying that smoking pot is her way of dealing with stress, pain, and emotions. In 2013, Lady Gaga suffered from a hip injury that required surgery and left her wheelchair bound to recover.

  • Kendra Wilkinson Battled Drug Addiction Before Achieving Fame

    Kendra Wilkinson Battled Drug Addiction Before Achieving Fame

    The reality tv star and former Hugh Hefner girlfriend is known for being quite candid about the details of her life. In her 2011 memoir Sliding Home, Wilkinson opened up about life at the Playboy mansion, as well as her struggles with drugs and sex as a teenager in Southern California.

  • Claudia Gadelha Credits Sports To Helping Her Beat Drug Addiction

    Claudia Gadelha Credits Sports To Helping Her Beat Drug Addiction

    MMA fighter Claudia Gadelha is on the brink of winning the title if she can defeat Joanna Jedrzejczyk on December 13. Gadelha has her work cut out for her going up against the undefeated Jedrzejczyk. Winning the title is something of a dream for Gadelha, who 10 years ago led a very different life.

  • 5 Signs You Might Have Hit Your Bottom

    5 Signs You Might Have Hit Your Bottom

    For many people, it can be difficult to tell the difference between acceptable or heavy use and addiction. Here are a few indicators that can help you determine whether you have, in fact, hit your own rock bottom.

  • U2 Makes Mistake by Sending Slash a Case of Guinness

    U2 Makes Mistake by Sending Slash a Case of Guinness

    The Irish natives of U2 sent a welcoming gift to Slash upon his arrival in Dublin that unfortunately missed the mark. Slash, the renowned guitarist for Guns and Roses, has been sober for eight years and yet received a case of Guinness as a "Welcome to Dublin" package from Bono and his bandmates.

  • Brooke Shields Talks about her Mother’s Alcoholism

    Brooke Shields Talks about her Mother’s Alcoholism

    Former model and actress Brooke Shields is releasing an upcoming memoir called "There was a Little Girl" which will detail her rise to fame as well as her troubled childhood before she was launched into stardom in the 70s and 80s. Shields opens up in the book about a painful past dominated by her alcoholic mother, Teri Shields who recently passed away at the age of 79.

  • James Kottak returns to Scorpions line-up after Rehab Stint

    James Kottak returns to Scorpions line-up after Rehab Stint

    After battling some controversy with the band and finally coming to terms with his alcoholism, drummer James Kottak will finally rejoin the Scorpions for their upcoming album and next year's tour. This summer Kottak made the announcement that he would be working with Bob Forrest, an addiction specialist known for working with musicians and "Celebrity Rehab".

  • California Taking Steps To Change Drug Incarceration Laws

    California Taking Steps To Change Drug Incarceration Laws

    After recently passing proposition 47 in the November elections, California voters took a significant step toward ending mass incarceration and the war on drugs. The state already made steps toward changing drug law in 2012 when it reformed the 'three strikes law'.

  • Methadone Turns 50

    Methadone Turns 50

    Although the drug methadone was first developed during World War II in Germany, it wasn't until the mid-sixties that it began to be used as a treatment for heroin addiction. In the 40s and 50s the drug was not broadly used at first because of reported side effects such as nausea and possible overdose.

  • Florida Judge Seeks Pay While In Alcohol Treatment Program

    Florida Judge Seeks Pay While In Alcohol Treatment Program

    A judge for Broward County that was recently suspended by the Supreme Court because of her alcohol problem and is currently undergoing treatment has been looking for continued pay. Judge Gisele Pollack was accused of being intoxicated twice in court and driving under the influence around local streets in the area.

  • Alcoholic Genetics And The Role They Play In Getting Sober

    Alcoholic Genetics And The Role They Play In Getting Sober

    Genetics plays a large part in determining whether a person is susceptible to addiction. Experts have determined that genetics are responsible for about half of addictive behavior and that environmental factors are responsible for the other half.

  • Bunavail Is Approved By FDA To Treat Opioid Addiction

    Bunavail Is Approved By FDA To Treat Opioid Addiction

    Vicodin, morphine, OxyContin, methadone, heroin, and codeine are commonly abused opioid drugs. There are more than two million people with opioid dependence who require some type of treatment to overcome their addiction.

  • Treatment Options for those Struggling with Alcoholism

    Treatment Options for those Struggling with Alcoholism

    Alcoholism is a serious disease affecting 6.8 percent of Americans. Alcohol addiction occurs when the body becomes chemically dependent upon the substance, and a person may also have an emotional dependence as well.

  • What Can College Drinking do to Your Psyche?

    What Can College Drinking do to Your Psyche?

    College drinking is a problem that impacts the lives of students of various ages across the country. Drinking and binge drinking are problems that specifically impact college students for a number of reasons.

  • What You need to know about Spice and it’s rising Popularity

    What You need to know about Spice and it’s rising Popularity

    Spice is the latest dangerous drug that is being used and abused by teenagers across the country. Many parents may have heard of the drug "Spice" in passing, but may be unfamiliar with the nature of the drug Spice and why exactly it has grown in popularity and how teenagers are using the nature of the drug to hide their use from their parents, teachers, and the other adults that may possibly be able to stop kids from using this dangerous substance.

OxyContin Addiction

While for most people, the idea of a dangerous drug brings to mind heroin, crack, and even methamphetamine, OxyContin is actually one of the deadliest and most addictive substances available. The fact that OxyContin is manmade and is accessible through a doctor’s prescription does not make it safer for human use than a drug like heroin. In fact, prescriptions for OxyContin are what have led to the majority of drug use progressing to abuse and onto addiction in the United States.

OxyContin: The Drug

OxyContin works as a painkiller by blocking messages to the brain alerting of discomfort or a problem somewhere in the human body. Because of its potential for abuse, its side effects, and its propensity for addiction, OxyContin’s composition and labeling were required to change, per the FDA. As a result, demand has decreased, but the drug is still extremely dangerous.

OxyContin, the brand name of Purdue Pharmaceuticals’ pill version of the painkiller, oxycodone, is a narcotic, just like heroin. Along with Vicodin, Percodan, Percocet, morphine, codeine, methadone and heroin, OxyContin and this entire classification of drugs, called opiates or opioids, have an extremely high rate of abuse, an even higher rate of addiction, and an undeniable link as the cause of thousands of overdose deaths every year.

What Does OxyContin Do?

OxyContin, created to mimic the effects of morphine, is comprised mainly of oxycodone. The drug works by blocking pain messengers in the brain, via the central nervous system. Internal levels of the natural neurotransmitter, dopamine, are affected, making the individual feel more pleasure and even euphoria, but the whole experience is chemically created. As a result, organic dopamine production is thrown out of whack, and the drug seems to be the only way to ever have a positive experience again.

Medicine

When used properly, as medically prescribed, OxyContin is a highly effective painkiller that relieves the suffering of cancer patients and those with major physical pain. In an effort to treat acute and chronic pain, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved OxyContin for medical use in 1995. Since its introduction to the medical community, OxyContin has quickly become one of the most addictive and most deadly drugs available. When taking more OxyContin than medically necessary, the drug produces a euphoric feeling, but that is never why a physician has recommended the drug for use.

Drug Formulation

The pill version of oxycodone was designed with a slow-release formula so that only the appropriate amount of medication makes its way into the user’s bloodstream at any given time. With this method, ongoing pain can be properly alleviated. However, the potential for ways to abuse OxyContin were realized almost immediately. Instead of just relieving pain, OxyContin users figured out how to manipulate the drug to also get high.

Statistics

OxyContin has been the subject of countless news reports and research studies. As the FDA witnessed the impact of OxyContin on the United States’ population, the organization began conducting research studies. Results, published in The Journal of the American Medical Association, announced that oxycodone-related deaths increased 93% and oxycodone-related emergency room visits increased 32% between 1997 and 1998.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released information that 15,000 Americans died of opiate and opioid related deaths in 2008, which marked a 300% increase from 1999. The rate of prescription pill deaths in one year was more than the total number of deaths linked to heroin and cocaine combined. Further, in 2008, Purdue Pharmaceuticals reported over $2 billion in annual OxyContin sales, nearly double the amount sold in 2007. The drug’s sales increased to nearly $3 billion the next year, and made it to $3.1 billion in 2010. This means that enough prescriptions for painkillers had been administered in 2010 to medicate every adult in the U.S., 24 hours a day, for an entire month.

Legal Involvement

After years of OxyContin sales, Purdue Pharmaceuticals was found liable for the drug’s addiction and death rates. The company entered a guilty plea to a single felony count of misbranding and paid out $600.5 million. Plus, three of the company’s top executives were each charged with misbranding misdemeanors and fined $34.5 million, which the company paid.

Changes to the Deadly Drug

As a result of the law suit, Purdue Pharmaceuticals reformulated OxyContin to reduce its abuse potential. Along with the changes came a new label warning of the drug’s side effects, dangers, and probability toward addiction. The combined changed have proven effective in decreasing the demand for OxyContin.

OxyContin: The Effects

The use of OxyContin affects the entire nervous system: the heart, the lungs, the brain, the reproductive, respiratory, digestive, and immune systems, and every major organ in the human body.

Unlike some other pharmaceutical drugs, the side effects of taking OxyContin are not mild. Instead of just possible dizziness and dry mouth, OxyContin affects the entire central nervous system. This means that the heart, the lungs, the brain, the reproductive, respiratory, digestive, and immune systems, and every major organ are impacted by the drug’s abuse.

As a result, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) reports record high cases of OxyContin abuse, physical and psychological dependence (i.e. addiction), and overdose deaths. Purdue Pharmaceuticals has been criticized for downplaying the dangers of OxyContin and has been required, by the FDA, to make changes to the label. The side effects are now listed right on the bottle of OxyContin along with what the FDA calls the strongest warning ever for a pharmaceutical drug.

Actual side effects of OxyContin use are:
  • Depressed respiration, or respiratory failure
  • Constipation
  • Lowered blood pressure
  • Slowed pulse
  • Confusion
  • Nausea, vomiting, or stomach cramps
  • Slurred speech
  • Lack of coordination
  • Inability to stay awake
  • Impairment of menstrual cycle in females
  • Severe withdrawal symptoms when drug use stops

Increased OxyContin Use

Similar to heroin, an increased tolerance to the pain-blocking euphoric effects leads an OxyContin user to want a larger dosage of the drug each day. Accidental OxyContin overdose is caused when a user does not stop increasing the dose, until one day, the amount of the drug is too much for the body to metabolize. Rarely does an OxyContin overdose result in an outcome other than death or permanent brain damage.

Stopping the Progression of OxyContin Use

The dangerous side effects of OxyContin make its use incredibly risky. If you are using OxyContin, or know someone who is, the behavior can stop with the right medical help. Recovery Now TV finds the treatment centers with the most experience and the best staff to help stop the progression of OxyContin use to abuse and addiction.

Under the guidance of medical doctors and substance abuse professionals, our team at Recovery Now TV has helped many opiate addicts get through medical detoxification and onto formal treatment. We work with licensed counselors who customize treatment plans, complete with tools for preventing dependence on OxyContin, skills for dealing with cravings for narcotics, lifelong coping skills to sustain a new life without substances.

Give Recovery Now TV a call today at 800-281-4731 to find out where you can start your new life.

OxyContin Abuse

Substance abuse, the step before addiction, consists of the continuation of any drug use despite its negative impact on the user’s life.

When a prescription drug is used in any way other than how a doctor prescribed it, the drug is being abused. The purpose is no longer proper pain treatment; the goal is to get high.

If a 90-day supply of OxyContin is deemed necessary for recovery after surgery, for example, and the individual uses the given quantity in 60 days, the drug has been abused. Similarly, when a portion of one’s personal quantity of OxyContin is sold to someone who does not also have a doctor’s prescription, the drug is being abused.

Although OxyContin was manufactured as a time-release pill, designed to relieve pain for up to 12 hours, when the drug is crushed and injected, snorted, chewed, smoked, or dissolved into a liquid, the time-release function is destroyed. Abusers feel a heroin-like rush from eating, drinking, snorting, or injecting the powdered, or pulverized, form of OxyContin.

The pleasurable feeling created by the abuse of OxyContin is leading even those who truly needed a prescription, to abuse the drug for the euphoria and the complete alleviation of all pain. Since the pharmaceutical drug can be so easily abused, often users quickly progress from legitimate use to abuse, and then onto addiction. Individuals who have not been educated on the dangers and side effects of OxyContin may not understand the drug’s powerful narcotic impact on the human body.

All too often, a person who has been prescribed OxyContin believes that the drug is safe because a doctor has deemed it medically appropriate. Sadly, the true effects of OxyContin abuse are widely unknown to most of the people who are taking the pharmaceutical. Consequently, OxyContin’s side effects become the reason for thousands of emergency room visits and causes of death every year.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), via the organization’s Drug Abuse Warning Network, emergency room incidents involving oxycodone increased 89% between 1993 and 1999. Those rates jumped another 68% from 1999 to 2000; illustrating the reality of the influence OxyContin abuse is having on our society.

As one of the most powerful pain relievers on the market, OxyContin became a substitute for heroin. Instead of injecting a risky street drug, individuals started going to a doctor, complaining of chronic pain, in an effort to get what is essentially the pill form of heroin. The pharmaceutical versions seem less dangerous than heroin, are perceived with less cultural stigma than “street drugs,” and come in a pretty little pill instead of via a needle, but make no mistake: prescription opiate narcotics are no less dangerous than any other version, like heroin, codeine, and morphine.

When the first high is experienced from OxyContin, abuse goes beyond just pain relief. The desire for an amount of the drug that creates that euphoric high is continuously pursued. For those users, who are not educated on the dangers of opiates, OxyContin use can unintentionally spiral out of control.

The body begins to change and chemicals in the brain begin to adapt to the continuous, and often rising, presence of OxyContin. The appropriate pain relief that used to come from one or two pills now requires five or six pills. As abuse continues to progress, it is not unusual for an individual to then need a dozen pills of OxyContin to feel the effect that used to come with just a couple. Physical tolerance to the drug has developed and the systems of the body and the brain now require more pills to ward off pain, or to get high.

When the body can no longer handle the dose that is being taken, meaning that the amount of the drug in the person’s system can no longer be metabolized, the drug becomes lethal. This is an overdose. The body does not distinguish between OxyContin, another pharmaceutical, and heroin when dosages become so high that breathing stops and other organs shut down, including the heart. OxyContin overdoses are just like heroin overdoses. The body cannot handle the level of narcotics present.

The good news is that complete recovery from any opiate is possible. With help from trained professionals, OxyContin abuse can stop before an overdose, or the progression to addiction, ends a life.

Recovery Now TV offers the latest in medical detoxification and effective therapeutic techniques for treating OxyContin abuse. Through effective referrals, our treatment team will help find the best detox and treatment program for you. Call Recovery Now TV to find out more: 800-281-4731.

OxyContin Addiction

Addiction includes:
  1. Loss of control over substance use
  2. Obsession with use
  3. Continued use despite adverse life consequences
  4. Denial that there is a problem with a substance
  5. A powerful likelihood of relapse

Addiction is defined as a chronic disease with a high probability of relapse. When a person fits the criteria of addiction, he or she can be diagnosed with physical and psychological dependence upon at least one mind-altering drug, or life-impairing behavior. The ability to stop using is diminished, and every aspect of the person’s life can reach incapacitation.

The use of OxyContin negatively impacts the entire central nervous system. The influence on the body and the brain decrease a person’s ability to make good choices. OxyContin addiction begins to affect relationships, commitments, and responsibilities, as the drug begins taking daily priority. When abuse crosses over into addiction, jobs are lost, schoolwork falls by the wayside, relationships crumble, families are torn apart, physical and mental health deteriorates, and even legal consequences can begin dictating a person’s life.

While this process can happen for any drug, the cycle of addiction is most difficult to break for opiates and opioids. The drugs in this classification alter brain chemistry as they relieve pain, and create a euphoric high when taken in higher doses than physically necessary. Without an intension of addiction, or even abuse of the drug, thousands of people find themselves fitting the criteria for OxyContin addiction.

A well-cited definition of addiction includes these five criteria:

  1. A Loss of Control over substance use;
  2. Obsession with substance use;
  3. Continued use Despite Negative Life Consequences;
  4. Denial of a problem with substances and/or behaviors; and,
  5. A powerful tendency to Relapse back to substance use.

When used in an example, a person who has become addicted to OxyContin is unable to stop taking pills on his or her own. Each day this person is obsessed with finding the drug and using it, and even after this behavior has caused adverse life consequences (i.e. loss of a job, complete financial devastation, or the end of an important relationship), OxyContin use continues.

Through all of this, the addict denies that there is a problem with OxyContin, sometimes in the some form of, “I need the drug to treat my chronic pain.” Denial is very powerful, and so is OxyContin. Even when use stops, whether the person admits a problem with the substance or not, someone who can be diagnosed with addiction returns to the drug, or relapses, often after just a short time of cessation.

Whether for you or for a loved one, this list provides signs and symptoms of addiction to look for in someone who is taking OxyContin:

  • Feeling physically sick when the supply of OxyContin is gone. (i.e. withdrawal symptoms)
  • Engaging in illegal activity to get OxyContin.
  • Increasing the amount of OxyContin taken each day. (i.e. increased tolerance)
  • Experiencing feelings of guilt or shame about OxyContin use.
  • Losing a job, failing out of school, or losing a loved one because of OxyContin use.
  • Changes in eating and sleeping patterns.
  • Mood swings.

Additionally, in an effort to feel a satiable high again, many opiate addicts will combine alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, and other pharmaceutical drugs with OxyContin. This signals drug addiction. The act of combining chemicals is extremely dangerous because drug interactions in your body are unpredictable, and therefore, high risk and often life-threatening. Via several famous opiate addicts, like Heath Ledger, Cory Monteith, and most recently, Philip Seymour Hoffman, we see just how easily prescription pills, heroin, and the mixture of several drugs can lead to an untimely death.

Instead of suffering through the life of addiction, break the cycle by calling Recovery Now TV. OxyContin addiction must be treated, and with the help of our team, you can begin the detox and recovery process today.

Recovery Now TV has helped hundreds of people overcome opiate and opioid addiction. With proven techniques and effective medical procedures, recovery begins with medically supervised detoxification. Once OxyContin is out of the body, rehab can begin where treatment plans are customized to each individual client and a wide variety of services are available to heal the mind, body, and soul.

Give Recovery Now TV a call today at 800- 281-4731 to explore your options and to treat your OxyContin addiction.

Withdrawal from OxyContin

OxyContin Withdrawal Symptoms:
  1. Muscle and bone pain
  2. Restlessness
  3. Diarrhea
  4. Insomnia
  5. Vomiting
  6. Cold flashes
  7. Involuntary leg movements

OxyContin withdrawal is no less serious than quitting heroin, despite the fact that OxyContin use may have started with a legitimate doctor prescription.

Opiate and opioid withdrawal indicators are physical symptoms experienced when the body reacts to a lack of any drug in the opiate family. The body and the brain have become accustomed to having a painkiller to function, so when a substance like OxyContin is suddenly taken away, pain seems excruciating, digestion is a major problem, and the entire central nervous system revolts. Muscles cramp, bones and joints ache, and the entire body sweats. Nausea, an inability to sleep or eat, and a relentless experience of anxiety also ensue. Overall, OxyContin withdrawal produces flu-like symptoms and major discomfort.

The pain and distress of OxyContin withdrawal can be minimized under proper medical supervision. Recovery Now TV has connections with monitored detoxification programs for opiate addiction.

OxyContin withdrawal is not a process you want to go through on you own. To stand a chance at making it through the first few days without returning to OxyContin use, seek participation in one of Recovery Now TV’s referrals with medical facilities, professional doctors, and licensed counselors helping you through the entire process.

Give us a call today at 800-281-4731 for a private consultation. We can help you stop using OxyContin and start a new life free of addiction.

Detox & Treatment

OxyContin addiction requires monitored detoxification and formal treatment. The team at Recovery Now TV is here to help you find the best program to fit all of your recovery needs. Call now, 800-281-4731.

Completely ridding the body of OxyContin is vital for any chance at recovery from opiate addiction. As the most addictive class of drugs, these substances are not easily forgotten. With the assistance of medical professionals, who can administer proper medications and can continuously monitor vital signs, detoxification can be completed with greater ease.

Participation in a detox program sets a former OxyContin addict up for entry into a formal inpatient opiate treatment program. With individual therapy, peer group processing, family therapy, and other proven therapeutic approaches to recovery, an OxyContin addict can make changes with a positive attitude and a readiness to change. While not easy, a substance free life is available to addicts everywhere.

Recovery Now TV has dealt with hundreds of clients with your exact symptoms. Our effective treatment referrals are based on experience and research. If you are addicted to OxyContin, or someone in your life cannot stop using an opiate, it is time for help.

To find out where you can receive the best in opiate and opioid treatment, contact our team at Recovery Now TV, 800-281-4731. Our professional staff is standing by to give you a confidential consultation.