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Recovery Now TV is designed to build awareness surrounding the recovery from drug and alcohol addiction. We believe that treatment and recovery WORKS. The video content and the dialogue between people who have recovered brings hope to those who are still struggling with their addiction.

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  • Brain Circuitry Changes From Social Drinking

    Brain Circuitry Changes From Social Drinking

    When someone develops an addiction, they run the risk of not only seeing their personality and behavior change but also the way their brain functions. Scientists have seen a noticeable difference between an addicted brain and a non-addicted brain especially in terms of control mechanisms.

  • Is Alcohol Really Being Sold On Instagram?

    Is Alcohol Really Being Sold On Instagram?

    Unfortunately, recent advances in both alcohol sales and social media have proven to be a new way that teens may be at risk for finding and abusing dangerous alcoholic drinks.

  • How The Body Reacts To Long Term Heroin Addiction

    How The Body Reacts To Long Term Heroin Addiction

    Heroin is a very addictive drug that can be extremely challenging to withdraw from because of the fact that a person who is withdrawing from heroin addiction may experience extremely uncomfortable and unpleasant sensations.

  • Insurance Difficulties Heroin Addicts Have When Seeking Help

    Insurance Difficulties Heroin Addicts Have When Seeking Help

    Heroin addiction is one of the most difficult forms of substance abuse to quit and addicts need extensive treatment to experience a successful recovery. Unfortunately, many heroin addicts seeking help for their problem are finding it hard to get approval for their treatment from insurance companies.

  • The Sad Story Of Peaches Geldof Problems With Addiction

    The Sad Story Of Peaches Geldof Problems With Addiction

    Peaches Geldof, daughter of musician Bob Geldof and his late ex-wife Paula, was a beautiful young woman, a television presenter, a journalist, a model and a mother, who died at the age of only 25. What killed her was her addiction to heroin, the same thing that took her mothers life when Peaches was only 11 years old.

  • ‘Epipen For Addicts’ Prophylactic Naloxone Used To Counter Drug Overdoses

    ‘Epipen For Addicts’ Prophylactic Naloxone Used To Counter Drug Overdoses

    Heroin and opiate addiction is a deadly disease that continues to plague millions of Americans. Heroin is one of the most addictive and dangerous drugs and it carries with it a very high risk for death by overdose. As heroin and opiate addiction continues to become an increasingly large public health problem, many professionals in the medical and pharmaceutical industries have clamored to find ways in which the number of deaths related to heroin use may be minimized.

  • Dual-Diagnosis Was The Case For Demi Lovato

    Dual-Diagnosis Was The Case For Demi Lovato

    Demi Lovato is known by millions of Americans as a young and successful singer, actress, and television host. The twenty one year old celebrity has enjoyed quite a bit of public attention as both a recording artist and one of the hosts of the popular television show The X Factor.

  • How to Build a Strong Support Group in Recovery

    How to Build a Strong Support Group in Recovery

    Recovery is more than just abstaining from drug use or going through detox; it is a long process that can be filled with many ups and downs. There are a myriad of issues that a recovering addict must face even long after they have completed a rehab program.

  • 5 Tips To Avoid The Pitfalls Of Dating In Recovery

    5 Tips To Avoid The Pitfalls Of Dating In Recovery

    When someone gets sober, the "good feelings" that were produced from using drugs or alcohol seem like they are no longer available due to the fact that using drugs and alcohol is no longer an option.

  • Understanding The Process Of Heroin Withdrawal

    Understanding The Process Of Heroin Withdrawal

    One of the hardest parts of recovering from an addiction is going through the steps of detoxification. For a serious addiction like heroin abuse, the process can be especially painful and difficult to get through. It is crucial for anyone looking to quit their heroin addiction to find a safe and comfortable detoxification center or rehab facility that will help them through the process of withdrawal.

  • 'Take Back’ Programs For Unused Prescription Drugs Are On The Rise

    'Take Back’ Programs For Unused Prescription Drugs Are On The Rise

    The growing dangers of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. have prompted the creation of a number of programs designed to reduce the instances of abuse and addiction. These kinds of programs that are active across the country are known as "Take Back" programs which offer a way for communities to properly dispose of any unused prescription medications so that they do not end up in the wrong hands.

  • The Most Addictive Prescription Drugs Currently Available

    The Most Addictive Prescription Drugs Currently Available

    The abuse of prescription medications has become a problem in the U.S. with more than 2.4 million Americans using them non-medically on a regular basis. Although prescription drugs are provided by doctors and pharmacies to treat specific ailments, they are not always safe and in many cases can become highly addictive.

  • The Contagious Nature Of Drinking Alcohol

    The Contagious Nature Of Drinking Alcohol

    Many recovering alcoholics know that one of the biggest triggers for drinking can be the company of others who are drinking. Many alcoholics may have, for some time, been unaware of the severity of their problem because of the fact that they considered themselves "social drinkers." Many people may incorrectly assume that those who drink primarily in the company of others cannot be alcoholics. The reality is, however, that it is highly possible for alcoholism to be contagious and for a group of people who are addicted to alcohol to, in effect, enable one another.

  • Zohydro Abuse Concerns Go Nation-Wide As A Gateway To Heroin

    Zohydro Abuse Concerns Go Nation-Wide As A Gateway To Heroin

    Doctors. law enforcement agencies, and addiction treatment specialists have been disappointed with the recent approval by the FDA of a new drug call Zohydro, which many medical experts believe is the most dangerous opiate to hit the market to date. Many other experts believe that the drug, in addition to being highly addictive and dangerous in and of itself, may be a gateway to heroin use.

  • Russia's Recalcitrance to Recovery Movements

    Russia's Recalcitrance to Recovery Movements

    Alcoholism has been a significant problem in Russia for many years but citizens seem resistant to change and have not fully embraced the kind of recovery efforts that are common in the U.S. Russian leaders have made efforts to fight against the growing numbers of people suffering and even dying from alcoholism in the country but historically many of their attempts haven't worked.

  • Short And Long Term Effects Of Alcoholism On The Human Body

    Short And Long Term Effects Of Alcoholism On The Human Body

    There is no doubt that alcoholism can have devastating effects on a person's emotional life but it can also cause serious physical health problems and harm to the body. Alcohol is a drug that affects the body dramatically over a period of time.

  • Suboxone Carries A Heavy Price For Recovering Addicts

    Suboxone Carries A Heavy Price For Recovering Addicts

    Heroin and opiate addiction are two of the fastest growing health problems currently facing America. Heroin has long been viewed as one of the most dangerous and addictive drugs, and every year, the number of deaths related to opiate use and abuse sky rockets. Detoxing from opiates can be an extremely painful, uncomfortable, and even dangerous process. 

  • Scott Storch Recovers From Cocaine Addiction

    Scott Storch Recovers From Cocaine Addiction

    Famed music producer Scott Stortch has been reported to be in jail and, at times, even dead over the last several years. After publicly battling cocaine addiction and then relapsing after spending time in rehab, the producer has come out of his private life and announced that he is keeping a lower profile after struggling with a serious cocaine addiction that led him to lose virtually everything he owned, including almost all of a thirty million dollar fortune. 

  • Ray Charles’s Daughter To Sing And Speak About Addiction Recovery

    Ray Charles’s Daughter To Sing And Speak About Addiction Recovery

    Sheila Raye Charles is one of the singer’s 12 children and she too went down the path of addiction for years before finally experiencing recovery.She is traveling to a number of venues including churches and prisons across the country to speak about her experiences with addiction while singing and performing some of Ray Charles’ music as well. Sheila is now living a more successful sober life after recovering from her issues of drug abuse.

  • Powdered Alcohol (Palcohol) Is As Dangerous As It Sounds

    Powdered Alcohol (Palcohol) Is As Dangerous As It Sounds

    A new product has recently hit the market that has caused quite a stir among parents, teachers, and law enforcement agencies as well as those who work in drug treatment centers. The product, dubbed “Palcohol,” is powdered alcohol.

  • Ibogaine And Its Role In Heroin Addiction Treatment

    Ibogaine And Its Role In Heroin Addiction Treatment

    Heroin and opiate addiction is one of the most serious and rapidly growing health problems currently facing the United States. Heroin is a very dangerous drug for a number of reasons: it is highly addictive (many experts rank it as the most addictive narcotic), and it is linked to overdose more often than almost any other drug.

     

  • Mental Health And Addiction Often Coincide

    Mental Health And Addiction Often Coincide

    Addiction can already be a complex problem to resolve but addicts often suffer from issues of mental health which can compound the situation, making it harder for them to reach a full recovery. 

  • Elizabeth Vargas Writing A Memoir Of Her Struggle With Alcoholism

    Elizabeth Vargas Writing A Memoir Of Her Struggle With Alcoholism

    The co-anchor of 20/20, Elizabeth Vargas has only recently begun to open up about her issues with alcoholism after completing a stay in rehab. She is now willing to share the details of her story by writing a memoir about her alcohol problem and the process of her recovery. 

  • The Courage It Takes To Identify As An Addict

    The Courage It Takes To Identify As An Addict

    A common saying in recovery groups is that the first step to quitting an addiction is admitting you have a problem. Even though it is only the first step in a long journey, it is often one of the hardest things for people to do. 

Heroin Addiction

As one of the most damaging and addictive drugs available, heroin has claimed the lives of too many people. Treatment is needed to break the cycle of addition and to start a new, healthy, and substance-free life. Experts believe that the sooner intervention happens and the sooner drug use stops, the easier it is for a heroin addict to make a full recovery.

Our team at Recovery Now TV will find the best detoxification, inpatient, and outpatient services for everyone in need. If you, or a loved one, need help for heroin addiction, contact us now at 800-281-4731.

Heroin: The Drug

Heroin is categorized as an opiate, derived from morphine, with highly addictive properties and extremely quick-acting effects. Its euphoric high and complete painlessness make heroin a popular street drug, hooking users almost immediately. While the drug seems only pleasurable during its high, there are many side effects associated with the use of heroin. Like any substance, heroin affects each person differently, which makes it an unpredictable and incredibly dangerous drug.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 105 people die every day from a drug overdose, and another 6,748 are treated for complications directly resulting from drug use. Nearly a million people in the United States use heroin every year, and most of those users become addicted to the drug and suffer consequences as a result. Not only is the drug very addictive, the symptoms and side effects associated with heroin’s use are also very serious and can lead to permanent problems, and often to death.
Heroin changes the composition of the human brain, with the first high often creating an insatiable need for more. A desire for pain relief, an escape, or to self-medicate leads thousands of people to the drug that can forever change their lives.

The idea of “heroin chic” was popularized through advertisements and films in the late 1980s and early 1990s, telling viewers that heroin effects, such as losing one's appetite and becoming incredibly thin and pale, were attractive. In reality, heroin interferes with the proper functioning of its user's body, and with repeated use, little is desired in life other than another high.

Those who initially use the drug are seeking an escape from a painful reality. Finally a substance that promises relief from emotional and psychical pain delivers, and for a short period of time, heroin offers the user a break, and even a few moments of ecstasy, from an otherwise sad and depressed life that lacks pleasure of any kind. From there, the drug seems to work as medication. As a 20-year-old recovering male heroin addict told the authors of the book, Uppers, Downers, All Arounders:

“Heroin is my doctor. Any pain that I had, be it physical or mental or whatever, that’s what it’s there for, for my – depression, whatever. It’s just like medicine pretty much. And I don’t know, after a while it became more like life itself. Like I needed it just to exist.”

Heroin can be smoked, snorted, or injected intravenously. Since IV injection creates the most intense effects, it is the most desirable, and most popular, way to use the drug. In recent years, with the large outbreak of drug-related HIV and AIDS cases from the sharing of dirty needles, trends toward snorting and smoking heroin have been documented. Many users also believe that by snorting and smoking the drug, there is less risk for progressing to addiction. This belief is untrue; the only difference between injection and other methods of heroin use is that the use of a needle sends the drug directly into the bloodstream and, therefore, affects a person's mind and body faster.

Unfortunately, for those who become dependent upon heroin, the risk of contracting incurable and fatal diseases such as HIV, AIDS, and hepatitis, often becomes outweighed by the desire for a faster and more intense high. An addicted heroin user may continue IV use despite knowledge of contractible and fatal diseases. As one of the most addictive drugs available, with the most difficult cycle of addiction to break, heroin addicts rarely stop using without formal treatment services.

Heroin is a relatively pricey drug, but after a person experiences the pleasure, cost can become insignificant. The high is so enjoyable that a new user, very likely to become addicted to the effects and sensations of a heroin high, will continue to use the drug no matter what. Consequently, heroin quickly became popular in urban areas, however its use has spread to all communities and neighborhoods throughout the country.

People who become addicted to heroin, who were once successfully participating in life, both within their environment and with the people around them, become desperate and behave accordingly. To obtain the now needed drug, a life of crime, prostitution, and complete disregard for anything other than heroin takes over the mission of each day. Relationships, responsibilities and activities that were once important, now slip away to the life of heroin addiction. Some addicts begin to sell precious belongings and to steal from people they love, while others turn to street life and to the selling of their own bodies to get more heroin.

Although the drug obviously hurts the person who is addicted to it, all of the people associated with an addict are hurt as well. A heroin drug addict will also begin to isolate, only engaging in activities that will lead to the acquisition of more drugs. Many users will give up hope and start to believe that they will die addicted to heroin, but here is hope through Recovery Now TV!

Heroin: The Effects

Heroin affects the entire central nervous system and, therefore, every part of the human body. The drug destroys the brain, the heart, the lungs, and the digestive, reproductive, and immune systems.

The use of any psychoactive, mind-altering drug leads to different types of effects, both physical and psychological. The effects of heroin are extremely detrimental to a person's mind and body, and millions of people are abusing this dangerous substance without understanding the inevitable consequences.

Heroin impacts the central nervous system, so it has intensely damaging effects on every part of the human body. The drug’s compound negatively impacts the heart, lungs, brain, eyes, voice box, muscles, and the following systems: reproductive, digestive, excretory, immune, cardiovascular, and respiratory. As a result, the user experiences dizziness, a change in skin temperature, lowered blood pressure, changes in eating and sleeping patterns, insensitivity to pain, lowered pulse and respiration, confusion, and nausea, among others.

Some heroin users also report the sensation of the body becoming heavy with fatigue paired with a sense that the world around them no longer exists and their ability to function, both mentally and physically, has decreased. Because of the toxins in the drug, as well as the way that it is taken into the body, heroin abuse often leads to accidental overdose. Rarely does a person who injects too much heroin come out alive and unharmed. More often death or severe permanent damage is the result.

When heroin first enters the human body, its chemical components mix with the natural chemistry of the individual’s brain, and the drug’s toxins create what users describe as a feeling of euphoria. The first high experienced is said to be the best that heroin will ever feel. The user’s brain is flooded with endorphins and the neurotransmitter, dopamine, that all create reward, positive reinforcement, and pain-free pleasure. A heroin user is then constantly seeking the feelings of that first high, called “chasing the dragon.” Until treatment, or death, the euphoria-seeking cycle controls a heroin user’s entire life.

Once the high has worn off, the desire to obtain more of the drug grows in the form of an obsession and an undying craving for heroin. The dragon is being chased, and most likely physical and psychological dependence on the drug has begun.

Heroin Addiction

Components of Addiction:
  1. Loss of Control Over Heroin Use
  2. Obsession Over the Use of Heroin
  3. Continued Use Despite Adverse Life Consequences
  4. Denial That There is a Problem with Heroin
  5. A Powerful Tendency to Relapse

Heroin addiction is a disease that affects a person's entire being. The drug itself negatively impacts the entire central nervous system, and the associated lifestyle creates adverse, and often irreversible, damage to the addict’s life. When the abuse of heroin has progressed to a point of physical and psychological dependence, that individual is addicted. When the use of heroin stops, even for a short amount of time following the last high, a painful set of symptoms ensues that almost always leads an addict right back to heroin, even when trying to quit the drug’s use.

The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) defines addiction as a chronic, relapsing disease characterized by, what the organization terms A, B, C, D, and E:

  1. An Inability to consistently Abstain from substances;
  2. Impairment in Behavioral control;
  3. Craving, or increased “hunger” for drugs or rewarding experiences;
  4. Diminished recognition of significant problems with one’s behaviors and interpersonal relationships; and,
  5. A dysfunctional Emotional response.

To offer another perspective, the authors of Uppers, Downers, All Arounders, Darryl S. Inaba, Pharm.D. and William E. Cohen, view addiction as a progressive disease, meaning it continues to get worse as substance use continues, and is characterized by:

  1. A Loss of control over substance use;
  2. Obsession with substance use;
  3. Continued use despite negative life consequences;
  4. Denial of a problem with substances and/or behaviors; and,
  5. A powerful tendency to relapse back to substance use.

In other words, when heroin use has progressed from use to abuse, and then onto physical and psychological dependence, the addict has lost all control over heroin use, lives with an obsession for the drug’s use, continues to use heroin despite negative life consequences, denies that there is a problem with heroin, and operates with a powerful likelihood of relapse when the use of heroin stops.

People suffering from heroin addiction are often unable to see clearly because the drug has altered brain chemistry. A person who was once responsible, honest, and compassionate begins disregarding responsibilities, lying, and stealing from loved ones to feed the heroin addiction. The only thing a heroin addict sees clearly is the need for more heroin. The thought of going through even another five minutes without the drug, in some cases, scares addicts to the point where they will go to any length to get high again.

When the life of a heroin addict revolves around the drug, everything else gets neglected. Relationships fall apart, marriages end, jobs are lost, financial situations are completely destroyed, failing out of school has occurred, and life-changing legal repercussions have transpired, not to mention one’s physical and mental health can be permanently damaged.

Heroin addiction tears apart families and causes despair where there was once happiness. At Recovery Now TV, we are dedicated to helping families and individuals put their lives back together. Through our comprehensive list of treatment programs, all people suffering from heroin addiction and addiction to other drugs, can undergo the rigorous but rewarding process of starting a new life. If you, or someone you love, need help, drug treatment is the next step. Please contact Recovery Now TV and ask about our consultation services and treatment options. A new life is just a phone call away!

Heroin Detox

Withdrawal symptoms can include diarrhea, convulsions, vomiting, and uncontrollable body movements. The physical effects of heroin withdrawal are extremely uncomfortable and difficult to endure, but with proper medical attention the few days of painful withdrawal can be effectively navigated, leading to the readiness for formal treatment.

Detoxification is the first step in freeing an addict from the bonds of his or her drug, or drugs, of choice. The process of detoxing from heroin must occur under medical supervision to ensure the best possibility for success. If heroin detox is done improperly, or a person tries to go through it alone, the results may be extremely painful, possibly fatal, and more often than not, ending in a return to heroin. Heroin is a toxin, and the body must first rid itself of the poisonous substance that has been causing the ongoing cycle of addiction. When the heroin detox process begins, both the body and mind will be craving heroin, which shows up as a series of withdrawal symptoms. These range from vomiting, hot and cold flashes, diarrhea, mood swings, and dizziness, to bone, joint, and muscular pain, insomnia, anxiety, intense sweating, rapid pulse, fever, chills, and high blood pressure.

When a heroin detox program is conducted in a medical facility, detox specialists are able to help relieve the addict’s pain and discomfort. With close supervision by staff who constantly monitor the patient’s heart rate and other vital signs, professional detox ensures that the process goes smoothly for the addict. With the introduction of a nutrition plan during the detox process, the body more easily adjusts to life without heroin.

Heroin Detox with Recovery Now TV

Recovery Now TV has been referring heroin addicts to appropriate detoxification programs for several years and has subsequently found the best methods and combinations for each client. With a personalized approach, the chances of a positive outcome increase exponentially. Since heroin detox can be extremely painful, the detoxification facilities we use have a proven method.

Recovery Now TV's well-trained staff has assisted numerous addicts through the detox process with comfort and safety. The idea of heroin detox creates anxiety and fear for most addicts. At Recovery Now TV we understand and want to make the process as easy and as restful as possible. Heroin detox is difficult, but we have seen the reward and relief upon completion.

Caring for the Body

An in-house nutritionist places the addict on a well-rounded plan to ensure that the proper nutrients and vitamins, that the body has been deprived of during active addiction, are restored. The healthier the body, the easier it is for the patient to focus on the mental and emotional elements of the treatment plan that occur after detox. If difficulties occur during the heroin detox process, there are many pharmaceutical medications that a physician can prescribe, without the introduction of another substance that has any potential for addiction.

What’s Next?

After the first, most difficult days, members of our treatment team begin educating the addict on what the formal treatment program will look like. With descriptions of our programs, the services we offer during treatment, and the long-term outlook, we find that our clients feel more at ease while transitioning from detox to inpatient rehab. To ensure our clients’ success, we strive for trust prior to entry into formal treatment. At Recovery Now TV we provide referrals to the best treatment services for heroin addiction and any substance abuse disorder. With serene locations and highly competent staff, starting life in recovery becomes a pleasant experience. If you, or someone you love, has a problem with heroin and cannot stop using drugs, Recovery Now TV can help. Please contact us today and find out how one of our detox centers can help you begin a new life. Recovery starts with you!

Heroin Treatment

Recovery Now TV provides the best referrals in substance abuse treatment and will help you or your loved one begin the journey away from heroin addiction and back into society. A commitment to recovery and a readiness to change are all you need. Call now, 800-281-4731.

Once a person has gone through a complete medical detoxification program, heroin treatment will look to incorporate a person's mental, emotional, and spiritual health, working toward full recovery from heroin. Heroin treatment is a process and an attempt to save the addict from a life controlled by drugs. With tools and skills, an addict can avoid returning to heroin and the permanent damage and death that certainly follow. For those reasons, it is crucial that heroin treatment occurs in a facility that can properly treat all aspects of substance abuse.

Recovery Now TV offers access to heroin treatment programs that address all of the symptoms and issues associated with heroin use. The process has many different phases, all of which focus on integrating and improving an addict's physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual health. Because each person is different, Recovery Now TV offers a wide variety of treatment options to accommodate all specific needs. Once the medical detox portion of treatment has successfully cleansed the physical body, the real work can begin.

Inpatient Treatment with Recovery Now TV

At Recovery Now TV we provide referrals to rehab centers that offer one-on-one counseling, group therapy, and family counseling, plus other modalities of care, as a comprehensive way to work through each client’s personal reasons for using.

Our highly effective treatment teams provide one-on-one counseling is safe environments in which the addict can discuss problems, feelings, limitations, and struggles to eventually begin an honest examination of the ways in which heroin affected his or her life. Through this process, a personalized, individual treatment plan creates the roadmap for the addict’s time in treatment. The addict will be better able to avoid and cope with situations that present a desire to use in the future when he or she understands personal triggers.

A process group full of an addict’s peers allows sharing, with the potential for ongoing feedback. An addict learns how to help others, and how to allow others to help him or her. Group therapy provides a setting in which addicts can share their experiences with one another and can reflect upon how they think heroin treatment is going.

Through addiction, relationships with family members are most certainly strained. Recovery Now TV understands the importance of parents, spouses, children, and other loved ones setting new boundaries for the addict upon his or her return after heroin treatment. Family members can also learn what the addict is learning to help continue the use of tools and coping skills when the recovering addict comes home. With a now clean and sober family member, parents, partners, and children can more effectively communicate with the person who lived as an addict, and seemingly as a whole other person.

Throughout all forms of therapeutic treatment, professionals work with each addict to find a nutritional and wellness plan that strengthens the commitment to recovery. Activities such as exercise, meditation, and writing are beneficial in restoring a person's mind and body. Our heroin treatment program is the beginning of a new life, free from the cycle of addiction.

At Recovery Now TV we specialize in providing referrals for treatment to those who are trapped in the cycle of heroin addiction. Our treatment team understands the power of heroin, so we are dedicated to helping in the process of rebuilding the lives of the individuals who have been broken down by this deadly disease. The treatment and recovery programs we recommend teach addicts how to live without the use of substances, and how to function as newly sober members of society. The cycle of addiction can be broken with the help of heroin drug treatment.

If you, or someone you love, has a problem with drugs or alcohol and needs help, Recovery Now TV may be the opportunity you have been waiting for, and the best way to save a life. Please contact us today for consultation and find out how our programs can work for you. Our operators are standing by and want you to know that there is still hope. 800-281-4731.