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Recovery Now TV is designed to build awareness surrounding the recovery from drug and alcohol addiction. We believe that treatment and recovery WORKS. The video content and the dialogue between people who have recovered brings hope to those who are still struggling with their addiction.

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  • What Makes A Grateful Alcoholic?

    What Makes A Grateful Alcoholic?

    Recovering from alcohol addiction is by no means an easy process. Recovery is a life long process, and any recovering alcoholic knows that in order to stay healthy and sober it is necessary to constantly use the tools that they developed in treatment in order to fight the urges and triggers that are simply a reality in day to day life.

  • 4 Ways To Help The Most Desperate Addict

    4 Ways To Help The Most Desperate Addict

    Addiction is a disease that can be extremely difficult to recover from. When a person is addicted to drugs or alcohol, they are very likely to also suffer from conditions like depression and low self esteem, which can make it even more difficult to make the decision to seek help because an addict may not recognize their own self worth or realize that they deserve the chance to be happy and healthy again.

  • 5 Truths Of Addiction Treatment

    5 Truths Of Addiction Treatment

    When it comes time for someone to get off of an addiction and end the vicious cycle that it brings on, the best way to get started with this is to first go into a detox facility. In detox, the physical addiction will be remedied through the help of medications and care from the individuals who work there.

  • Buprenorphine A New Option For Heroin Addiction Treatment

    Buprenorphine A New Option For Heroin Addiction Treatment

    Opiate withdrawal is usually so intense that addicts find it hard to quit heroin or pain killers without the help of some kind of medication. In many cases, methadone has proven to be problematic as a medication for heroin addiction because it can become addictive.

  • Military Vets Susceptible to Prescription Drug Addiction

    Military Vets Susceptible to Prescription Drug Addiction

    Soldiers who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan have a high risk of facing issues with drug abuse when they return home. It is common for military veterans to experience symptoms of PTSD or post-traumatic stress disorder, along with chronic pain due to combat injuries.

  • NYPD Now Equipped With Naloxone to Help Fight Heroin Deaths

    NYPD Now Equipped With Naloxone to Help Fight Heroin Deaths

    A new program has provided the necessary funds for New York Police officers to be equipped with a heroin antidote known as Naloxone. Recent increases in heroin addiction and overdose in the area have made it necessary for the NYPD to be specially trained and equipped for this crisis.

  • 5 Things You Should Know about Xanax

    5 Things You Should Know about Xanax

    Physicians frequently prescribe drugs like Xanax for people with panic disorder or symptoms of anxiety. Although it can be an effective medication for those suffering from panic attacks and severe anxiety, Xanax is a drug that is commonly abused.

  • Chasing the Dream of Doing Cocaine Like A Gentleman

    Chasing the Dream of Doing Cocaine Like A Gentleman

    Drugs like cocaine are often considered to be a "gentleman's addiction". Cocaine is the type of drug that is expensive enough to be associated with high flying executives and high profile celebrities who can afford to make it a habit. Because of this image cocaine sometimes becomes glamorized by people who imagine that doing this drug makes you appear rich and powerful.

  • Is Treating Opioid Addiction With Suboxone A Safe Option?

    Is Treating Opioid Addiction With Suboxone A Safe Option?

    Physicians treating addiction to heroin or prescription opoids are usually able to see a better success rate when providing medication. Recovering from the abuse of a highly addictive drug like heroin can be too difficult for long time users who are attempting to quit "cold turkey".

  • Is Crack-Cocaine the Most Destructive Drug Ever?

    Is Crack-Cocaine the Most Destructive Drug Ever?

    Most illegal drugs can have devastating effects on individuals and communities that see a high rate of addiction, but crack-cocaine is a particularly destructive substance that is dangerously addictive. When crack was widespread in the 80s and early 1990s, it destroyed many inner city communities that are still recovering from its effects.

  • Teen Athletes More Predisposed To Prescription Drug Addiction

    Teen Athletes More Predisposed To Prescription Drug Addiction

    Recent studies have discovered that young teens participating in sports have a higher risk of developing an addiction to prescription drugs and especially opoid pain killers than those not involved in athletics. The issue is a much bigger problem for male teen athletes that are more likely to misuse prescription drugs than their female counterparts.

  • America’s Binge Drinking Problem

    America’s Binge Drinking Problem

    Excessive drinking is more common in the U.S. than we might realize as studies have shown a surprising amount of adults frequently binge on alcohol. As many as 38 million U.S. adults binge drink on a regular basis according to findings from a study by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

  • Suburban Opoid Problem Contributing to Heroin Addiction

    Suburban Opoid Problem Contributing to Heroin Addiction

    Heroin abuse is no longer a problem reserved for the inner city or the poorest neighborhoods; now the typical heroin addicts are young white teens and adults living in the suburbs. Part of the reason for this shift is the rise in prescription pain killer abuse which can be a gateway to heroin addiction.

  • The Major Symptoms of Percoset Use and Abuse

    The Major Symptoms of Percoset Use and Abuse

    Prescription drug abuse has been a problem for the U.S. since the 1990s and has nearly reached the point of a national crisis. Currently, there are seven million Americans who take prescription drugs for non-medical reasons and the majority of those are abusing pain killers.

  • Breast Cancer Tied to Alcohol Consumption

    Breast Cancer Tied to Alcohol Consumption

    Alcohol and especially chronic alcohol abuse is known to cause a myriad of health problems including cirrhosis of the liver and heart disease but few people realize how much of a connection there is between alcohol and certain types of cancer. Alcoholism is not traditionally considered a major cause of cancer but studies actually show a clear link to the disease especially in the case of breast cancer.

  • 5 Tips To Help A Heroin Addict Get Into Treatment

    5 Tips To Help A Heroin Addict Get Into Treatment

    Few things are as frustrating and terrifying as having a loved one who is suffering from heroin addiction. Most people are aware that heroin is highly addictive and that using heroin presents a number of very serious health risks.

  •  Is Teen Culture Now A Drug Fueled Culture?

    Is Teen Culture Now A Drug Fueled Culture?

    Almost every parent of a teen worries about their child getting involved with drugs or alcohol use. Teens have always been the population most prone to peer pressure that may lead to experimentation, and teens are also the people that may be most at risk for some of the dangers associated with drug or alcohol use.

  • South Africa Looking to Cut Down on Alcohol Advertisements

    South Africa Looking to Cut Down on Alcohol Advertisements

    The government of South Africa has made efforts to combat the nation’s significant problem with alcohol abuse by proposing a ban on liquor advertisements. The Control of Marketing of Alcohol Beverages bill that would ban alcohol ads throughout the country still remains under consideration with much debate as to the impact it would have on the community and the economy.

     

  • U.S. Senate Proposing New Bills To Fight Heroin Addiction

    U.S. Senate Proposing New Bills To Fight Heroin Addiction

    As heroin addiction and abuse continues to devastate both individuals in small cities and those in large metropolitan areas, many doctors and teachers and therapists are turning to law enforcement and government officials for answers as to what may be an effective means of minimizing and ultimately eliminating the use and abuse of this deadly drug.

  • The 5 Most Commonly Abused Prescription Drugs

    The 5 Most Commonly Abused Prescription Drugs

    There is little question that prescription drug use is on the rise in the United States. The rapid increase in the number of hospitalizations and and deaths related to prescription drug use and abuse has led many parents, doctors, and law enforcement agents to search for possible ways in which the tide of prescription drug addiction can be stemmed.

  • The Glamorous Side Of Cocaine Hides The True Effects

    The Glamorous Side Of Cocaine Hides The True Effects

    Cocaine is a very dangerous and addictive drug that carries with it a number of quite troubling side effects. Although many people are aware of the fact that cocaine is a dangerous drug, the drug is somewhat unique in that it carries with it a somewhat glamorous image.

  • Alcohol Not Being Sold At University Of Georgia Football Games

    Alcohol Not Being Sold At University Of Georgia Football Games

    The University of Georgia has recently implemented a new plan for designed to manage alcohol consumption and reduce the number of injuries and incidents caused by alcohol consumption at its football games with a new plan that has been coined the “Gameday Gameplan.”

  • How To Show Gratitude In Sobriety

    How To Show Gratitude In Sobriety

    The life that one lives under the tyranny of an addiction is one filled with stress, pain and isolation. Addictions are in no way beneficial to those who are in their grip, and for someone to get out of them they seem to have to have no other option.

  • How To Spot Prescription Drug Addiction

    How To Spot Prescription Drug Addiction

    Prescription drug addiction is fast becoming one of the most rapidly growing diseases in the country. Prescription drugs are highly habit forming and there is no such thing as a “typical” prescription drug addict.

  • 5 Facts You Need To Know About Heroin Withdrawal

    5 Facts You Need To Know About Heroin Withdrawal

    Heroin is one of the most addictive and destructive drugs out in the world today. If someone does not overdose from it, then they are sure to catch some kind of disease such as AIDS, HIV, or Hepatitis C from the fact that it is common for heroin users to share needles without cleaning them or getting new ones.

  • 5 Consequences Of Binge Drinking

    5 Consequences Of Binge Drinking

    Binge drinking is defined as any time that an individual drinks to excess or consumes enough alcohol to make them seriously impaired. What constitutes binge drinking may vary quite a bit from person to person, but it is generally agreed that the average man is said to have engaged in binge drinking if he has consumed more than five drinks in two hours and the average woman if she has had four or more.

  • 5 Facts About America’s Problem With Prescription Drug Addiction

    5 Facts About America’s Problem With Prescription Drug Addiction

    The rate of addiction to prescription painkillers across the United States throughout the population is greater nowadays than all illegal drug addictions combined. More people than ever are getting hooked onto things like prescription painkillers such as Dilaudid, OxyContin, Methadone and morphine

  • 5 Facts You Probably Did Not Know About Cocaine

    5 Facts You Probably Did Not Know About Cocaine

    When chewed, the leaf of the coca plant gives you a high. This is what cocaine comes from. It is found in Central America, and thousands of years ago, the ancient Aztecs and Incas used it to get their hearts racing and blood flowing as they lived in high mountain regions where the air is thin.

  • Overall Health Risks Of Teen Prescription Drug Abuse

    Overall Health Risks Of Teen Prescription Drug Abuse

    The abuse of prescription drugs in today’s world has risen to the levels of an epidemic. All told, the amount of people who abuse prescription drugs surpasses that of people who use every type of illegal street drug like meth, cocaine and heroin combined.

  • Is Cocaine the Ultimate Party Drug?

    Is Cocaine the Ultimate Party Drug?

    A drug like cocaine is often viewed by users as a recreational or party drug that they would prefer to use only on certain occasions. People look for a drug like cocaine to enhance their party experience because it is a stimulant that offers a short burst of intense energy and a feeling of euphoria.

  • Dangers Of Recreational Cocaine Use

    Dangers Of Recreational Cocaine Use

    Cocaine is one of the most addictive and dangerous substances out in the world of illicit substances today. Whether used on a daily basis or from time to time, the effects of cocaine on the body and on the mind can be extremely damaging.

  • What Today’s Heroin Addict Looks Like

    What Today’s Heroin Addict Looks Like

    When it comes to the heroin abuser, most people imagine someone who is destitute, maybe homeless, not necessarily of any specific ethnic background, and poor. 

  • Sum 41’s Deryck Whibley Finds His Bottom

    Sum 41’s Deryck Whibley Finds His Bottom

    The life of someone who is a famous musician can be a turbulent one. Everyone knows the cliche that is the "rockstar life", with heavy drug use and drinking, life on the road, promiscuity, so on and so forth.

  • Breaking Down Prescription Drug Addiction On A National Level

    Breaking Down Prescription Drug Addiction On A National Level

    The abuse of prescription drugs has become the biggest drug abuse problem in Western Culture today. It has been estimated that within the United States alone, more than 15 million people abuse prescription drugs- more than the combined number who reported abusing cocaine, hallucinogens, inhalants and heroin.

  • Energy Drinks And Alcohol A Deadly Combination

    Energy Drinks And Alcohol A Deadly Combination

    It seems every month there is a new type of drink coming out in the bars across the country. They are usually some new combination or hybrid of something mixed with alcohol for better taste or more potency.

Heroin Addiction

As one of the most damaging and addictive drugs available, heroin has claimed the lives of too many people. Treatment is needed to break the cycle of addition and to start a new, healthy, and substance-free life. Experts believe that the sooner intervention happens and the sooner drug use stops, the easier it is for a heroin addict to make a full recovery.

Our team at Recovery Now TV will find the best detoxification, inpatient, and outpatient services for everyone in need. If you, or a loved one, need help for heroin addiction, contact us now at 800-281-4731.

Heroin: The Drug

Heroin is categorized as an opiate, derived from morphine, with highly addictive properties and extremely quick-acting effects. Its euphoric high and complete painlessness make heroin a popular street drug, hooking users almost immediately. While the drug seems only pleasurable during its high, there are many side effects associated with the use of heroin. Like any substance, heroin affects each person differently, which makes it an unpredictable and incredibly dangerous drug.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 105 people die every day from a drug overdose, and another 6,748 are treated for complications directly resulting from drug use. Nearly a million people in the United States use heroin every year, and most of those users become addicted to the drug and suffer consequences as a result. Not only is the drug very addictive, the symptoms and side effects associated with heroin’s use are also very serious and can lead to permanent problems, and often to death.
Heroin changes the composition of the human brain, with the first high often creating an insatiable need for more. A desire for pain relief, an escape, or to self-medicate leads thousands of people to the drug that can forever change their lives.

The idea of “heroin chic” was popularized through advertisements and films in the late 1980s and early 1990s, telling viewers that heroin effects, such as losing one's appetite and becoming incredibly thin and pale, were attractive. In reality, heroin interferes with the proper functioning of its user's body, and with repeated use, little is desired in life other than another high.

Those who initially use the drug are seeking an escape from a painful reality. Finally a substance that promises relief from emotional and psychical pain delivers, and for a short period of time, heroin offers the user a break, and even a few moments of ecstasy, from an otherwise sad and depressed life that lacks pleasure of any kind. From there, the drug seems to work as medication. As a 20-year-old recovering male heroin addict told the authors of the book, Uppers, Downers, All Arounders:

“Heroin is my doctor. Any pain that I had, be it physical or mental or whatever, that’s what it’s there for, for my – depression, whatever. It’s just like medicine pretty much. And I don’t know, after a while it became more like life itself. Like I needed it just to exist.”

Heroin can be smoked, snorted, or injected intravenously. Since IV injection creates the most intense effects, it is the most desirable, and most popular, way to use the drug. In recent years, with the large outbreak of drug-related HIV and AIDS cases from the sharing of dirty needles, trends toward snorting and smoking heroin have been documented. Many users also believe that by snorting and smoking the drug, there is less risk for progressing to addiction. This belief is untrue; the only difference between injection and other methods of heroin use is that the use of a needle sends the drug directly into the bloodstream and, therefore, affects a person's mind and body faster.

Unfortunately, for those who become dependent upon heroin, the risk of contracting incurable and fatal diseases such as HIV, AIDS, and hepatitis, often becomes outweighed by the desire for a faster and more intense high. An addicted heroin user may continue IV use despite knowledge of contractible and fatal diseases. As one of the most addictive drugs available, with the most difficult cycle of addiction to break, heroin addicts rarely stop using without formal treatment services.

Heroin is a relatively pricey drug, but after a person experiences the pleasure, cost can become insignificant. The high is so enjoyable that a new user, very likely to become addicted to the effects and sensations of a heroin high, will continue to use the drug no matter what. Consequently, heroin quickly became popular in urban areas, however its use has spread to all communities and neighborhoods throughout the country.

People who become addicted to heroin, who were once successfully participating in life, both within their environment and with the people around them, become desperate and behave accordingly. To obtain the now needed drug, a life of crime, prostitution, and complete disregard for anything other than heroin takes over the mission of each day. Relationships, responsibilities and activities that were once important, now slip away to the life of heroin addiction. Some addicts begin to sell precious belongings and to steal from people they love, while others turn to street life and to the selling of their own bodies to get more heroin.

Although the drug obviously hurts the person who is addicted to it, all of the people associated with an addict are hurt as well. A heroin drug addict will also begin to isolate, only engaging in activities that will lead to the acquisition of more drugs. Many users will give up hope and start to believe that they will die addicted to heroin, but here is hope through Recovery Now TV!

Heroin: The Effects

Heroin affects the entire central nervous system and, therefore, every part of the human body. The drug destroys the brain, the heart, the lungs, and the digestive, reproductive, and immune systems.

The use of any psychoactive, mind-altering drug leads to different types of effects, both physical and psychological. The effects of heroin are extremely detrimental to a person's mind and body, and millions of people are abusing this dangerous substance without understanding the inevitable consequences.

Heroin impacts the central nervous system, so it has intensely damaging effects on every part of the human body. The drug’s compound negatively impacts the heart, lungs, brain, eyes, voice box, muscles, and the following systems: reproductive, digestive, excretory, immune, cardiovascular, and respiratory. As a result, the user experiences dizziness, a change in skin temperature, lowered blood pressure, changes in eating and sleeping patterns, insensitivity to pain, lowered pulse and respiration, confusion, and nausea, among others.

Some heroin users also report the sensation of the body becoming heavy with fatigue paired with a sense that the world around them no longer exists and their ability to function, both mentally and physically, has decreased. Because of the toxins in the drug, as well as the way that it is taken into the body, heroin abuse often leads to accidental overdose. Rarely does a person who injects too much heroin come out alive and unharmed. More often death or severe permanent damage is the result.

When heroin first enters the human body, its chemical components mix with the natural chemistry of the individual’s brain, and the drug’s toxins create what users describe as a feeling of euphoria. The first high experienced is said to be the best that heroin will ever feel. The user’s brain is flooded with endorphins and the neurotransmitter, dopamine, that all create reward, positive reinforcement, and pain-free pleasure. A heroin user is then constantly seeking the feelings of that first high, called “chasing the dragon.” Until treatment, or death, the euphoria-seeking cycle controls a heroin user’s entire life.

Once the high has worn off, the desire to obtain more of the drug grows in the form of an obsession and an undying craving for heroin. The dragon is being chased, and most likely physical and psychological dependence on the drug has begun.

Heroin Addiction

Components of Addiction:
  1. Loss of Control Over Heroin Use
  2. Obsession Over the Use of Heroin
  3. Continued Use Despite Adverse Life Consequences
  4. Denial That There is a Problem with Heroin
  5. A Powerful Tendency to Relapse

Heroin addiction is a disease that affects a person's entire being. The drug itself negatively impacts the entire central nervous system, and the associated lifestyle creates adverse, and often irreversible, damage to the addict’s life. When the abuse of heroin has progressed to a point of physical and psychological dependence, that individual is addicted. When the use of heroin stops, even for a short amount of time following the last high, a painful set of symptoms ensues that almost always leads an addict right back to heroin, even when trying to quit the drug’s use.

The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) defines addiction as a chronic, relapsing disease characterized by, what the organization terms A, B, C, D, and E:

  1. An Inability to consistently Abstain from substances;
  2. Impairment in Behavioral control;
  3. Craving, or increased “hunger” for drugs or rewarding experiences;
  4. Diminished recognition of significant problems with one’s behaviors and interpersonal relationships; and,
  5. A dysfunctional Emotional response.

To offer another perspective, the authors of Uppers, Downers, All Arounders, Darryl S. Inaba, Pharm.D. and William E. Cohen, view addiction as a progressive disease, meaning it continues to get worse as substance use continues, and is characterized by:

  1. A Loss of control over substance use;
  2. Obsession with substance use;
  3. Continued use despite negative life consequences;
  4. Denial of a problem with substances and/or behaviors; and,
  5. A powerful tendency to relapse back to substance use.

In other words, when heroin use has progressed from use to abuse, and then onto physical and psychological dependence, the addict has lost all control over heroin use, lives with an obsession for the drug’s use, continues to use heroin despite negative life consequences, denies that there is a problem with heroin, and operates with a powerful likelihood of relapse when the use of heroin stops.

People suffering from heroin addiction are often unable to see clearly because the drug has altered brain chemistry. A person who was once responsible, honest, and compassionate begins disregarding responsibilities, lying, and stealing from loved ones to feed the heroin addiction. The only thing a heroin addict sees clearly is the need for more heroin. The thought of going through even another five minutes without the drug, in some cases, scares addicts to the point where they will go to any length to get high again.

When the life of a heroin addict revolves around the drug, everything else gets neglected. Relationships fall apart, marriages end, jobs are lost, financial situations are completely destroyed, failing out of school has occurred, and life-changing legal repercussions have transpired, not to mention one’s physical and mental health can be permanently damaged.

Heroin addiction tears apart families and causes despair where there was once happiness. At Recovery Now TV, we are dedicated to helping families and individuals put their lives back together. Through our comprehensive list of treatment programs, all people suffering from heroin addiction and addiction to other drugs, can undergo the rigorous but rewarding process of starting a new life. If you, or someone you love, need help, drug treatment is the next step. Please contact Recovery Now TV and ask about our consultation services and treatment options. A new life is just a phone call away!

Heroin Detox

Withdrawal symptoms can include diarrhea, convulsions, vomiting, and uncontrollable body movements. The physical effects of heroin withdrawal are extremely uncomfortable and difficult to endure, but with proper medical attention the few days of painful withdrawal can be effectively navigated, leading to the readiness for formal treatment.

Detoxification is the first step in freeing an addict from the bonds of his or her drug, or drugs, of choice. The process of detoxing from heroin must occur under medical supervision to ensure the best possibility for success. If heroin detox is done improperly, or a person tries to go through it alone, the results may be extremely painful, possibly fatal, and more often than not, ending in a return to heroin. Heroin is a toxin, and the body must first rid itself of the poisonous substance that has been causing the ongoing cycle of addiction. When the heroin detox process begins, both the body and mind will be craving heroin, which shows up as a series of withdrawal symptoms. These range from vomiting, hot and cold flashes, diarrhea, mood swings, and dizziness, to bone, joint, and muscular pain, insomnia, anxiety, intense sweating, rapid pulse, fever, chills, and high blood pressure.

When a heroin detox program is conducted in a medical facility, detox specialists are able to help relieve the addict’s pain and discomfort. With close supervision by staff who constantly monitor the patient’s heart rate and other vital signs, professional detox ensures that the process goes smoothly for the addict. With the introduction of a nutrition plan during the detox process, the body more easily adjusts to life without heroin.

Heroin Detox with Recovery Now TV

Recovery Now TV has been referring heroin addicts to appropriate detoxification programs for several years and has subsequently found the best methods and combinations for each client. With a personalized approach, the chances of a positive outcome increase exponentially. Since heroin detox can be extremely painful, the detoxification facilities we use have a proven method.

Recovery Now TV's well-trained staff has assisted numerous addicts through the detox process with comfort and safety. The idea of heroin detox creates anxiety and fear for most addicts. At Recovery Now TV we understand and want to make the process as easy and as restful as possible. Heroin detox is difficult, but we have seen the reward and relief upon completion.

Caring for the Body

An in-house nutritionist places the addict on a well-rounded plan to ensure that the proper nutrients and vitamins, that the body has been deprived of during active addiction, are restored. The healthier the body, the easier it is for the patient to focus on the mental and emotional elements of the treatment plan that occur after detox. If difficulties occur during the heroin detox process, there are many pharmaceutical medications that a physician can prescribe, without the introduction of another substance that has any potential for addiction.

What’s Next?

After the first, most difficult days, members of our treatment team begin educating the addict on what the formal treatment program will look like. With descriptions of our programs, the services we offer during treatment, and the long-term outlook, we find that our clients feel more at ease while transitioning from detox to inpatient rehab. To ensure our clients’ success, we strive for trust prior to entry into formal treatment. At Recovery Now TV we provide referrals to the best treatment services for heroin addiction and any substance abuse disorder. With serene locations and highly competent staff, starting life in recovery becomes a pleasant experience. If you, or someone you love, has a problem with heroin and cannot stop using drugs, Recovery Now TV can help. Please contact us today and find out how one of our detox centers can help you begin a new life. Recovery starts with you!

Heroin Treatment

Recovery Now TV provides the best referrals in substance abuse treatment and will help you or your loved one begin the journey away from heroin addiction and back into society. A commitment to recovery and a readiness to change are all you need. Call now, 800-281-4731.

Once a person has gone through a complete medical detoxification program, heroin treatment will look to incorporate a person's mental, emotional, and spiritual health, working toward full recovery from heroin. Heroin treatment is a process and an attempt to save the addict from a life controlled by drugs. With tools and skills, an addict can avoid returning to heroin and the permanent damage and death that certainly follow. For those reasons, it is crucial that heroin treatment occurs in a facility that can properly treat all aspects of substance abuse.

Recovery Now TV offers access to heroin treatment programs that address all of the symptoms and issues associated with heroin use. The process has many different phases, all of which focus on integrating and improving an addict's physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual health. Because each person is different, Recovery Now TV offers a wide variety of treatment options to accommodate all specific needs. Once the medical detox portion of treatment has successfully cleansed the physical body, the real work can begin.

Inpatient Treatment with Recovery Now TV

At Recovery Now TV we provide referrals to rehab centers that offer one-on-one counseling, group therapy, and family counseling, plus other modalities of care, as a comprehensive way to work through each client’s personal reasons for using.

Our highly effective treatment teams provide one-on-one counseling is safe environments in which the addict can discuss problems, feelings, limitations, and struggles to eventually begin an honest examination of the ways in which heroin affected his or her life. Through this process, a personalized, individual treatment plan creates the roadmap for the addict’s time in treatment. The addict will be better able to avoid and cope with situations that present a desire to use in the future when he or she understands personal triggers.

A process group full of an addict’s peers allows sharing, with the potential for ongoing feedback. An addict learns how to help others, and how to allow others to help him or her. Group therapy provides a setting in which addicts can share their experiences with one another and can reflect upon how they think heroin treatment is going.

Through addiction, relationships with family members are most certainly strained. Recovery Now TV understands the importance of parents, spouses, children, and other loved ones setting new boundaries for the addict upon his or her return after heroin treatment. Family members can also learn what the addict is learning to help continue the use of tools and coping skills when the recovering addict comes home. With a now clean and sober family member, parents, partners, and children can more effectively communicate with the person who lived as an addict, and seemingly as a whole other person.

Throughout all forms of therapeutic treatment, professionals work with each addict to find a nutritional and wellness plan that strengthens the commitment to recovery. Activities such as exercise, meditation, and writing are beneficial in restoring a person's mind and body. Our heroin treatment program is the beginning of a new life, free from the cycle of addiction.

At Recovery Now TV we specialize in providing referrals for treatment to those who are trapped in the cycle of heroin addiction. Our treatment team understands the power of heroin, so we are dedicated to helping in the process of rebuilding the lives of the individuals who have been broken down by this deadly disease. The treatment and recovery programs we recommend teach addicts how to live without the use of substances, and how to function as newly sober members of society. The cycle of addiction can be broken with the help of heroin drug treatment.

If you, or someone you love, has a problem with drugs or alcohol and needs help, Recovery Now TV may be the opportunity you have been waiting for, and the best way to save a life. Please contact us today for consultation and find out how our programs can work for you. Our operators are standing by and want you to know that there is still hope. 800-281-4731.