Yoga Provides Centering for Those in Recovery

on Wednesday, 15 April 2015. Posted in Breaking News

Early recovery can be a challenging time, when stress, loneliness, boredom, and other emotions threaten to overwhelm you. The risk of a relapse is at an all time high during the early phase of recovery as well.

This is why it's so important to take care of your health and stay in touch with your emotions during this time, as well as throughout your recovery. Knowing what resources are available to you for maintaining physical and emotional health will ensure that you're prepared to handle any challenges that arise (and they surely will).

Many people in recovery make it a habit to volunteer, journal about their experiences, exercise, play sports, meditate, go to therapy, and participate in other activities that not only enrich their lives, but keep them healthy and emotionally grounded.

One of the most popular practices for people in recovery in yoga. This ancient Eastern practice is great for staying in shape, as well as keeping oneself mentally healthy and encouraging a relaxed mind. Yoga also emphasizes a greater mind body awareness that can carry into other areas of one's life.

Yoga has been practiced for thousands of years because of its far reaching benefits to both the mind and body. These benefits include:

-reducing stress, which is a big contributor to many types of illnesses as well as a big concern for those in recovery.
-improving flexibility and strength without putting too much stress on the body's muscles.
-helps people sleep better at night by encouraging relaxation.
-regular practice of yoga helps maintain weight by reducing stress and the urge to overeat, as -well as increasing awareness of the body.
-improved blood circulation which contributes to a lower risk of developing high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.
-regular practice of yoga also encourages an inner sense of harmony that provides a healthier way of dealing with difficulties in life.
-other mental health benefits such as improved mental clarity, memory, and focus, reduced anxiety and feelings of depression, and an overall sense of well being.

These benefits are just a part of why yoga has become so popular among those in recovery. In addition to a myriad of health and mental health improvements, yoga helps heal those who have abused drugs and alcohol by getting them back in touch with their minds and bodies, something that has no doubt suffered as a result of years of addiction.

Yoga gets you back into your own body, so that you feel more confident, connected to, and in tune with your own unique skin. The stress relieving benefits of yoga provide a great way to cope with the overwhelming early stages of recovery. Yoga addresses the physical, mental, and spiritual nature of addiction in one simple practice that almost anyone can do.

Getting started with yoga is possible for anyone with a little focus and motivation to make a positive change. You don't need any fancy equipment and there are affordable yoga classes at community centers across the country. Here are some tips for starting your own yoga habit:

-start out with a guided beginning class so that you learn the basic poses in a slower paced and supportive environment.
-Look into the various types of yoga to determine which one is right for you. Some types of yoga emphasize the breath and relaxation, while others are more physical for providing a good workout.
-Purchase a yoga mat and comfortable clothes to begin your practice.
-When you're comfortable with the basic poses and becoming more flexible, move up to a more advanced class or begin practicing on your own.
-Make it a habit. Practice yoga at least a couple times a week to enjoy its benefit

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