Taking Action

on Monday, 12 November 2012. Posted in Breaking News, Alcohol

alcoholism rehab taking action

by Alexandra Rose

Taking action is the change needed to acquire a new sense of direction. Our wants and needs aren’t just going to come to us; we need to work for them. Getting sober and maintaining sobriety require surrender and maintaining a program of action. I hear the saying a lot, “This program isn’t for those who need it or want it rather it’s a program for those who do it.”

When I was living in my disease (alcoholism) I knew I had a problem for a long time but my pride and ego prevented me from asking for help. Deep down I knew what I had to do although I couldn’t find the strength inside me. That was until I actually surrendered and it wasn’t until I was on the brink of death that I asked for help. It was the hardest and smartest action I have ever taken. Taking the first step and admitting complete defeat was the beginning of my adventure in sobriety.

When I was introduced to the program, I realized it takes action to continually stay sober. From going to meetings to working the twelve steps of Alcoholics Anonymous with a sponsor, working a twelve step program doesn’t stop unless I let myself cease action.

Even in sobriety I reached a point where my life was inactive and I wanted a change. I went “back to basics” and started to do what was necessary when I first got sober. Calling my sponsor regularly, working the twelve steps of Alcoholics Anonymous over again, going to Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, and obtaining commitments is essential for my program. It’s never too late for someone with time to rework a program if they feel they are slipping. In fact, it’s necessary if one feels that a relapse might occur.

Not only with sobriety did I feel that I needed to take action in my life but also I wanted to work toward a productive future. This includes creating balance between program, school and leisure. I find the majority of people complain about something wrong with their life, instead of being willing to change. I learned in sobriety that expecting my goals to just happen, without work on my part, is an illusion. I work hard to be a productive member of society and work a program of action that requires faith and commitment. Learning to stay in action is not easy at first, but becomes easier over time, and delivers great rewards.

If you or someone that you love is struggling with drug addiction or alcoholism, please We want to help you.

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