For Alcoholics And Addicts, Prayer And Meditation Is As Vital As Air And Water

Written by DeShawn McQueen on Thursday, 15 November 2012. Posted in Voices in Recovery, Breaking News

Prayer And Meditation

Step 11: Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.

Those of us who have come to make regular use of prayer would no more do without it than we would refuse air, or sunshine. And for the same reason. When we refuse air, light, or food, the body suffers. And when we turn away from meditation and prayer, we likewise deprive our minds, our emotions, and our intuitions of vitally needed support. Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions, Page 97

Contrary to popular belief, prayer and meditation does not have to be formal and orthodox, nor does it require a problem or something to be solved in order for it to be done. It requires quite the opposite.

For the Alcoholic and Addict, prayer and meditation every day, throughout the day is integral, as it alleviates unnecessary stress and helps to maintain peace of mind and serenity.

In fact, I find that prayer and meditation is more or less a replacement for prescription pills, drugs, or alcohol.

Before an intervention was staged, or prior to entering drug or alcohol rehab we often used drugs or alcohol to mitigate unhappiness, abate the pain, push down those fermenting resentments, or just take the edge off.

However, now that we are clean and sober, we recognize that alcohol and drugs are no longer viable options.

Hence, the faith we once put in drugs and alcohol can now be put into prayer and meditation, and rightfully so.

Beginning a prayer or meditation practice is as simple as waking up and reciting these famous words: “God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can and wisdom to know the difference.”

Meanwhile as matters come up throughout the day, prayer is as simple as, “God help me,” or “Guide me heavenly father.”

A favorite prayer of mine is “direct my thoughts and actions” or “reveal to me what to do Lord.”

As long as you speak words of sincerity and ask in good faith, your Higher Power will answer.

Much of my prayer occurs steadily, throughout the day; sort of like an ongoing monologue.

Prayer never really ends, as I talk to him during good times, not so good times (perceived), and all those in between.

In fact, when something amazing happens, I thank God, or when I witness the happiness or joys of others, I thank God as well.

When something happens it is seemingly negative, I inquire with God, “what is the meaning of this God?” or “What do you want me to learn from this?”

Other times, when I notice another Alcoholic and Addict, who is perhaps homeless and on the street, I first thank God that it is not me. Meanwhile, I take the opportunity to talk to God, in an effort to pray for that person.

Alcoholics and Addicts, don’t be afraid of prayer and meditation, and don’t avoid it. Doing so only blocks you from all the joy, knowledge and guidance you might otherwise receive.

If you or someone that you love is struggling with drug addiction or alcoholism, please call or text us. We want to help you.

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About the Author

DeShawn McQueen

DeShawn McQueen

DeShawn McQueen is a staff writer at Recovery Now Newspaper and, an informative newspaper that serves as a resource for persons of all stages of drug and alcohol treatment, by giving them access to relevant and necessary information so that they may live balanced and substance-free lifestyles. DeShawn graduated from Wayne State University with Bachelor of Science degrees in psychology and premedical sciences. He holds a Juris Doctors degree in law from Valparaiso University School of Law. DeShawn’s writing and research has been published in such academic journals as Behavioral Pharmacology and Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior among others. He lives in Los Angeles, California.

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