Don’t Fight! It’s Not Worth It!

Written by DeShawn McQueen on Monday, 12 November 2012. Posted in Voices in Recovery, Breaking News

Addiction And Sobriety

I am a good listener. I did not always realize that until I had worthwhile people [or wise people shall I say] to listen to.

Like most addicts and alcoholics, I was a rogue of sorts, too independent to go with the flow! Perhaps I was that way out of necessity, as there were not so many wise people to listen to, until now that is!

Ironically, I have met some of the most wise people I have ever come across in my young life in the rooms of Alcoholics Anonymous.

One in particular, an incredibly wise, brilliant business man [and great friend/mentor], tells me “let it go.”

Not only a very successful business man who has positively impacted the lives of so many through his philanthropic endeavors, but also through employment opportunities, he learned to prioritize what truly matters……i.e., what is worth fighting for.

He has had a tremendous impact on my life, as I have received some much needed direction, an appropriate trajectory to direct my time and energy.

Much of what I have learned came to me indirectly, just by watching and observing his ability to effortlessly apply the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous in his life.

I have learned not only how to prioritize my time better, but to dream bigger, be more creative and to develop more discipline and fortitude.

As I develop more discipline and invest more energy in what really matters, I have less time to put toward those annoying battles with little-minded or mean people.

I find that they are not on my radar as much, as I have learned to fertilize the ground in my life.

In fact, I am less easily irritated by the small stuff. Richard Carlson would be proud!

As a rather sensitive person, I was so easily frustrated, so much so that I gathered resentments frequently. To deal with them, I often turned to the bottles……bottles of prescription pills and bottles of alcohol to stop the wheels of resentments from rolling.

The resentments were so bad that they obscured my ability to focus on what truly mattered. Hence I used prescription pills to settle my live wire of a mind, to slow down my mind, to stop the thoughts and to gain some semblance of control!

By the grace of God, I don’t have to do that anymore, particularly since it no longer was working.

As I apply steps six, seven, and ten of the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous on a daily basis, I shrewdly pick and choose my battles.

Therefore, I exert far less useful and otherwise productive energy on what does not matter, i.e. fights with mean, insecure people.

The more I apply the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous as the remedy to my issues and disagreements the more peace seems to creep into every crevice of my life.

Life becomes illuminated in direct proportion to the dissipation of the ego.

If you or someone that you love is struggling with drug addiction and alcoholism, please call or text us now. We want to help you.

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About the Author

DeShawn McQueen

DeShawn McQueen

DeShawn McQueen is a staff writer at Recovery Now Newspaper and, an informative newspaper that serves as a resource for persons of all stages of drug and alcohol treatment, by giving them access to relevant and necessary information so that they may live balanced and substance-free lifestyles. DeShawn graduated from Wayne State University with Bachelor of Science degrees in psychology and premedical sciences. He holds a Juris Doctors degree in law from Valparaiso University School of Law. DeShawn’s writing and research has been published in such academic journals as Behavioral Pharmacology and Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior among others. He lives in Los Angeles, California.

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