Clean It Up and Clear It Out, Then Breath More Freely

Written by DeShawn McQueen on Monday, 15 October 2012. Posted in Voices in Recovery, Breaking News

Clean in Sobriety

I do not know about you, but I often take the most simple things for granted!

Yes, I take things such as organization, lack of clutter or overcrowding, clear space and tidiness for granted, despite the fact that I learned early on in sobriety that all are essential for well-being.

With that said, the inner reality is in direct proportion to the outer reality. Put another way, more often than not if your house or car is a “hot mess” or disorderly, you are anxious, worried, overwhelmed, sad, and so on.

The remedy is to flip the script! Clean up your space and watch the “sunlight” stream in.

If you take the time to clean up your space and free up space in your outer world, you will find that your inner world will clear up and the solution that you need will instantly, and almost “magically” manifest. It is just that simple.

To be honest, if cleaning overwhelms you, like it does me, do it a little at a time, like I do. That’s right, break it up into increments or segments and watch the peace and solutions arrive in your life in direct proportion.

It sounds simple and elementary, and perhaps it is. Yet, it is true and it is certainly very effective.

I have first-hand experience. This past week, due to moving, things were just in disarray. It started to really get to me.

I found myself more irritable, frustrated, overwhelmed, and less peaceful. That is a recipe for relapse.

Now that I am sober from alcohol and prescription pills I have no tolerance for unnecessary pain. I want the solution and I want it quick.

Rather than drink or use substances, I pray and meditate about it. Sometimes it is as simple as, God help me, please.

The answer came and it was simple….get organized, then clean it up, clear it out, and, if necessary, give it away, particularly if you are no longer using it.

That is exactly what I did over a period of about four days.

Now, if I would have tried to tackle it all at once, I would have inevitably become overwhelmed, despite the initial good intentions. Subsequently, the older version of me would have wanted to take a pill to feel better.

That is sobriety. Sobriety is clarity. “It is intuitively knowing how to deal with situations which use to baffle us.”

Today, I do not have to drink or run around doing the same thing over again, “expecting different results.” I look at life straight in the face and accept it for what it is then take the necessary steps.

The icing on the cake was that I was of service to others, by taking a ton of clothes, shoes, boots and accessories to the local Good Will. A lot of it was new or worn just once.

By getting rid of the excess items, I freed up room for more to come into my life, and I blessed others with wonderful garments and shoes and boots that they needed. I prayed that each item will bring them more joy than they brought me. It was a win, win!

Additionally, now that my space is clean and organized, I can think better, sans the clutter. I can find things easily, and because things are in order, I am more reluctant to leave something out of place now.

The rooms of my mind are as clean as the rooms of my material world. Remember that! It is all interconnected.

If you or someone that you love is struggling with alcoholism or drug addiction, please call or text us now. We can help you.

Photo Courtesy of: capecoralcarpetcleanersplus

About the Author

DeShawn McQueen

DeShawn McQueen

DeShawn McQueen is a staff writer at Recovery Now Newspaper and, an informative newspaper that serves as a resource for persons of all stages of drug and alcohol treatment, by giving them access to relevant and necessary information so that they may live balanced and substance-free lifestyles. DeShawn graduated from Wayne State University with Bachelor of Science degrees in psychology and premedical sciences. He holds a Juris Doctors degree in law from Valparaiso University School of Law. DeShawn’s writing and research has been published in such academic journals as Behavioral Pharmacology and Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior among others. He lives in Los Angeles, California.

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