Alcohol Not Being Sold At University Of Georgia Football Games

on Thursday, 14 August 2014. Posted in Breaking News

Alcohol Not Being Sold At University Of Georgia Football Games

The University of Georgia has recently implemented a new plan for designed to manage alcohol consumption and reduce the number of injuries and incidents caused by alcohol consumption at its football games with a new plan that has been coined the “Gameday Gameplan.” The Gameday Gameplan is a set of guidelines that eliminates alcohol consumption from football games by prohibiting outside alcohol and no longer selling alcoholic beverages at the games themselves. While some fans have argued that this policy is unfair to those who consume alcohol moderately, many other fans and officials agree that this measure will help keep students and fans safe during games, which can draw substantially large crowds.

The Dangers of Alcohol At College Football Games

The University of Georgia decision to stop selling alcohol at games is in line with the sentiments of many college football stadiums, who have experienced a number of severe problems with alcohol use and abuse at games. When individuals consume alcohol to excess, they are much more likely to engage in dangerous behavior such as getting into fights or otherwise provoking individuals around them. This problem may be made even more severe by the fact that there is a built in level of competition at football games, where one team is always rooting against another. Alcohol sales and consumption at college games has also proven to be very risky and problematic because of the fact that it may easily lead to underage drinking, as many of the fans at college games are students who are not of legal drinking age, but who may have access to alcoholic drinks when they are served at games. Binge drinking at college football games has also been tied to high numbers of drunk driving incidents, which can, of course lead to arrests and, more seriously, fatalities.

Tailgating Also Limited

Another part of University of Georgia’s Game Day Gameplan involves limiting the times during which fans may tailgate for a game. Prior to the adoption of the new policy, many fans were leaving cars in the stadium lot the not before the game or getting to the game in the extreme early morning in order to set up a spot and begin consuming alcohol before the game. Traditionally, fans who tailgate consume more alcohol than those who don’t, and many university officials feel that limiting the amount of time that may be spent tailgating will also help limit the amount of binge drinking that occurs at games. Under the guidelines of the new Gameday Gameplan, fans may not tailgate until 7 a.m., and adults who are at least 21 years old may consume alcoholic beverages, but only on the area that is officially part of the University of Georgia campus.

Many College Adopting Similar Policies

The University of Georgia is certainly not the first school to adopt a policy that limits the amount of alcohol that may be consumed or sold at football games, and it seems very unlikely that they will be the last. As more colleges struggle to find ways to deal with the problem of fans and students binge drinking, many schools have already begun to stop selling alcohol at their games or to limit the times during which fans may engage in tailgating. Schools like the University of Florida, LSU, Auburn, and Texas A&M have all placed restrictions on the hours during which fans may set up areas on which to tailgate. Officials are hopeful that these safety measures will help everyone who attends a game enjoy the game in an environment that is safe for all fans and players. 

photo credit: Aaron Conaway via photopin cc

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