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  • Is Kratom a Substitute for Opiates or a Tool For Getting Clean?

    Is Kratom a Substitute for Opiates or a Tool For Getting Clean?

    Opiate abuse is one of the fastest growing and most deadly diseases currently facing the United States. Each year, thousands of people overdose on heroin or prescription opiates, and despite the best efforts of law enforcement and public health officials, opiate addiction continues to be on the steady incline.

  • Recognizing the Signs of Active Alcoholism

    Recognizing the Signs of Active Alcoholism

    Alcoholism is a disease that strikes people of all ages and from all walks of life. Like all addictions, alcohol often leads the person who is suffering from alcoholism to deliberately conceal their alcohol abuse from others. Many loved ones may also not be entirely aware of what constitutes alcoholism, and whether their loved one is truly suffering from alcohol addiction.

  • How valuable is Methadone Treatment to Opioid Addicts?

    How valuable is Methadone Treatment to Opioid Addicts?

    Prescription drug abuse, of opioid painkillers especially, is a very fast rising form of drug addiction, claiming more lives then any other form of preventable death. Even when these prescriptions are not deliberately misused, they can easily become addictive, and often have a long and painful withdraw process.

  • What is Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs Aim to Prevent

    What is Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs Aim to Prevent

    In an effort to identify instances of prescription drug abuse and reduce the cases of addiction, prescription drug monitoring programs are sharing prescription records with doctors and pharmacists in other states. A prescription drug monitoring program is a statewide electronic database which collects designated data on prescribed substances that are dispensed within the state.

  • Veterans with PTSD More Likely to Be Prescribed Painkillers

    Veterans with PTSD More Likely to Be Prescribed Painkillers

    The men and women who serve in the military may return home as heroes but they are often dealing with a myriad of problems after completing their service. Veterans often must cope with severe pain because of combat-related injuries and mental health problems such as PTSD or post-traumatic stress disorder.

  • Practicing Tough Love with an Alcoholic

    Practicing Tough Love with an Alcoholic

    Seeing someone you really care about in the middle of something as intensely all consuming and harmful as an alcohol addiction can sometimes be excruciatingly painful. A life built around nothing but drinking can brings a lot of harm with it.

  • State of New York Publishes Site to help Struggling Opioid Addicts

    State of New York Publishes Site to help Struggling Opioid Addicts

    The misuse and addiction of opioid painkillers is one of the most rapidly growing and serious drug addiction epidemics to plague the United States. The state of New York, which has the country's third highest population, has not been immune to the problems associated with this ongoing and growing drug problem.

  • The Mental Aspect of Getting Clean and Sober

    The Mental Aspect of Getting Clean and Sober

    Getting sober is an act of total mental transformation. When you are actively using drugs and alcohol, it is easy for your brain to become accustomed to thinking in terms of using and maintaining a constant desire to keep finding and consuming drugs or alcohol.

  • Dealing with Alcohol in the House as an Alcoholic

    Dealing with Alcohol in the House as an Alcoholic

    Once an alcohol leaves their rehab program, they still face many challenges in maintaining their sobriety and continue to struggle to live their alcohol and drug-free lifestyle. If you are an alcoholic and you are moving back home with your family then you will have to take some time discuss the changes you have made with everyone in the household.

  • Benzodiazepine Etizolam Creating a Buzz Amongst Teens

    Benzodiazepine Etizolam Creating a Buzz Amongst Teens

    A new legal research drug known as Etizolam has become a target for the DEA due to its increasing abuse among teens in the U.S. Although the benzodiazepine analog can be dangerous it is currently legal to sell because of the way it is manufactured.

  • Liam Neeson Speaks about His Sobriety While Working on New Movie

    Liam Neeson Speaks about His Sobriety While Working on New Movie

    Newly sober actor Liam Neeson has opened up recently about his decision to quit drinking and the positive effect it has already had on his life. The action star is currently working on his new movie, "Taken 2" the sequel to the popular film that breathed new life into his career.

  • Take a Look at the Psychological Effects of Your Drinking

    Take a Look at the Psychological Effects of Your Drinking

    Alcoholism would not exist unless alcohol produced some "good feelings," or states of being that may seem fun, desirable, or a numbing of unresolved pain. However, a closer look at the psychological effects of drinking paint a much more complex and potentially dangerous picture.

  • Xenoport and NIAAA Collaborating on Alcoholism Treatment

    Xenoport and NIAAA Collaborating on Alcoholism Treatment

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse is working in cooperation with the pharmaceutical company Xenoport on a collaborative study that will examine the effectiveness of extended release tablets designed to treat individuals who are addicted to alcohol. This is one of many recent clinical studies that are examining whether certain drugs may be an effective means of helping alcoholics to deal with some of the physiological effects of withdrawing from alcohol.

  • Understanding What Hallucinogens Do to the Brain

    Understanding What Hallucinogens Do to the Brain

    Hallucinogenic drugs like LSD create an immediate effect on the brain and when used frequently enough can also cause long term problems. Hallucinogens work by altering a person's perception of reality at times causing hallucinations or other alterations of the senses.

  • 5 Reasons High Functioning Alcoholics still Find Their Bottom Eventually

    5 Reasons High Functioning Alcoholics still Find Their Bottom Eventually

    There is a stereotype of "alcoholics" that is often untrue and unhelpful, of violent and impoverished people who spend all of their days too drunk to function. The truth is that there are many people, called high functioning alcoholics, with out of control drinking who are nevertheless able to maintain a presentable face to the world, having a life that, to an outsider, looks good.

  • Ultra Potent New Research Chemical Benzo Flubromazepam

    Ultra Potent New Research Chemical Benzo Flubromazepam

    Benzodiazepines are a type of tranquilizer drug that is available as prescription medication but also in the form of research chemicals for experimentation and study. A new benzodiazepine derivative known as Flubromazepam has entered the market recently and is being sold in internet shops as a research chemical.

  • NFL Revises Drug Use Policy

    NFL Revises Drug Use Policy

    Athletes' careers depend on taking care of their bodies, so that they continue to perform well. Yet sometimes, professional players can get so confident in their own abilities and invincibility that they engage in reckless decisions to engage in substance abuse.

  • Why Alcoholism and Anorexia are Common in Young Adults

    Why Alcoholism and Anorexia are Common in Young Adults

    Anorexia is an eating disorder characterized by tight control over eating, to the point of avoiding food and an obsession with weight. Alcoholism is characterized by an out-of-control consumption of alcoholic beverages, drinking to the point of getting drunk compulsively.

  • Swedish Dance Club Goes Dry for a Night

    Swedish Dance Club Goes Dry for a Night

    Some people may be aware of how their drinking may be causing problems, for their health and their behavior, but are afraid of the process of recovery, thinking that sobriety will take them out of social settings where they have fun. Other people would not normally be interested in drinking to excess, but may consider it a requirement to be a part of social circles they are attracted to, that involve late night music and dancing.

  • What to Worry About When Detoxing from Alcohol

    What to Worry About When Detoxing from Alcohol

    Entering a treatment center and undergoing the process of detox for the first time can be an intimidating experience, especially if you don't know what to expect. It can help you feel more prepared for the first phase of recovery if you have a better idea of what your body will be going through and the best ways to handle certain situations that can come up.

  • Amanda Bynes Arrested for Suspicion of DUI

    Amanda Bynes Arrested for Suspicion of DUI

    Child actor Amanda Bynes has run into legal trouble yet again after she was arrested on suspicion of a DUI in Sherman Oaks, CA. The young starlet was taken into custody after police arrested her for not being able to pass a field sobriety test.

  • Denial Plays A Substantial Role in Alcoholism

    Denial Plays A Substantial Role in Alcoholism

    Alcoholism is a dangerous and often terrifying disease for a number of reasons, not least of which is the fact that when a person is addicted to alcohol, they often engage in highly risky behaviors, often blacking out and feeling extremely powerless while drinking.

  • Why is the U.S. 80% of the Worlds Prescription Drug Consumption?

    Why is the U.S. 80% of the Worlds Prescription Drug Consumption?

    Current estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau place U.S. population at around 319 million people, or slightly more then 4 percent of the people on earth. Thus, it is astounding that, according to congregational testimony by the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians, this one nation results in 80 percent of the consumption of prescription pain killers in the world.

  • Approaching a Person in Active Alcoholism

    Approaching a Person in Active Alcoholism

    When someone close to you is suffering from an addiction, it is never easy to confront them about their behavior and ask them to seek help. For family members and close friends, seeing someone in their life struggle with alcoholism is painful but they may not know what to do to stop it.

  • What You Need To Know About Methadone Maintenance

    What You Need To Know About Methadone Maintenance

    If you have been considering methadone treatment, or if you are an addict who is ready to seek help for your addiction to heroin or opiates, there are a few things you should know about methadone and a methadone maintenance program. Methadone maintenance can be a highly effective way of recovering from addiction, but there are risks inherent to methadone use that you should be aware of before you begin treatment.

  • 5 Ways Treatment Changes Your Perspective

    5 Ways Treatment Changes Your Perspective

    Recovering from drug and alcohol addiction is an incredibly transformative experience that changes virtually everything about the way an addict perceives and experiences the world. When a person is addicted to drugs or alcohol, they very frequently find that their priorities shift so that they are entirely consumed with using.

  • Does a Drug Taper Off Help before Detox?

    Does a Drug Taper Off Help before Detox?

    When an addict is ready to stop using drugs, one of the first things they must do is to detox. During detox, an addict, under the support of a medical staff, completely stops using and allows the dangerous drugs to leave their system. 

  • Dealing with Spousal Alcoholism and Addiction

    Dealing with Spousal Alcoholism and Addiction

    People struggling with addiction are not only harming their own bodies and minds, but they are also hurt the people around them and their relationships. Marriage is one relationship that can be especially strained through the pain of addiction, turning a happy home into a nightmare.

  • How to Stay Sober at Music Festivals

    How to Stay Sober at Music Festivals

    Music festivals can be very joyous and fun occasions, providing the opportunity to hear favorite bands and experience community in a new, exciting atmosphere. However, often these festivals are not only about the music itself, but also places for high levels of alcohol and drug use.

  • 5 Tools to Help Keep You Sober

    5 Tools to Help Keep You Sober

    Even after long periods of abstaining from our addictions, staying sober can be a challenge, and there may be periods where it feels like a difficult struggle. However, the truth is that it does not have to be a daily hardship, or feel like more then you can bear.

  • Prevent Substance Abuse by Understanding Drug Slang

    Prevent Substance Abuse by Understanding Drug Slang

    The central way to prevent drug abuse is with responsible education. By cultivating an awareness of what drugs are and the harm they can cause, you can work to prevent what may at first seem like harmless experimentation, but will lead to dangerous, compulsive addiction.

  • Surgery and Pain Medication Use in Recovery

    Surgery and Pain Medication Use in Recovery

    Opioid pain relievers have a very high potential for abuse, and can be very dangerous if taken beyond recommended doses, or for purposes other then their intended use. However, they can also be extremely useful in controlling otherwise unbearable pain, and allowing someone with chronic pain or recovering from extensive surgery to function

  • Painkiller Opana Quickly Rising In Use Around The Nation

    Painkiller Opana Quickly Rising In Use Around The Nation

    Prescription drug use has, for the past several years, been the nation's fastest growing and most dangerous drug epidemic. As deaths and hospitalizations continue to be on the rise in almost every state, legislatures and hospitals are working together to try to find ways to reduce the number of addictions and overdoses due to these dangerous drugs.

  • 5 Tips on Rebuilding Self-Esteem in Recovery

    5 Tips on Rebuilding Self-Esteem in Recovery

    Recovering from an addiction is a long emotional journey that can require a lot of personal growth to get back on track. Addicts most often suffer from issues of low self-esteem because their substance abuse has taken its toll on them psychologically.

  •  Let Your Actions In Sobriety Speak For Themselves

    Let Your Actions In Sobriety Speak For Themselves

    For a recovering addict, becoming sober means finding a whole new outlook on life and behaving completely differently than one did while they were struggling with addiction. This is why sobriety is a lifelong journey and not simply a quick fix.

  • Do Dry Drunks Suffer More In or Out of Recovery

    Do Dry Drunks Suffer More In or Out of Recovery

    There are numerous different aspects of recovering from an addiction and quitting the substance abuse itself is only the first step. Some people in recovery might focus solely on their abstinence but fail to make progress in other areas of their life that also contribute to their disease.

Binge Drinking

Binge drinking = 5 or more drinks in one sitting for a man and 4 or more drinks in one sitting for a woman.

Binge drinking is defined as the consumption of 5 or more alcoholic beverages at one time, for an adult male, and 4 or more for an adult female, at least once during the preceding two-week period. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) adds that binge drinking includes a person reaching a Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) of 0.08 or higher, which usually occurs when four or five drinks are consumed within two hours.

The NIAAA reports that one in every six adults in the United States binge drinks around four times every month, consuming an average of eight drinks per binge.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report the following statistics on binge drinking:

  1. Of all adults in the U.S. who drink excessively, approximately 92% have engaged in binge drinking within the last 30 days.
  2. Over 50% of all alcohol consumption in the U.S. is done in a binge drinking manner.
  3. Men report binge drinking twice as often as women.
  4. Binge drinkers admit to alcohol-impaired or drunk driving 14 times more than those who do not binge drink.
  5. Even though binge drinking is most common in the 18-34 age bracket (binge drinking four times each month), those who are 65 and older actually binge drink more often, estimated at five or six times each month.
  6. Income affects binge drinking rates: In households making at least $75,000, binge drinking is much more prevalent than in households earning a lower income.
  7. While binge drinking is most often associated with college students, 70% of all binge episodes actually occur among people aged 26 years and older.
  8. 67% of male sexual aggressors, and 50% of their victims, had been drinking at the time of the attack and sexual assault.

Alcohol is a dangerous drug, the effects of which are greatly overlooked. Drinking to the point of intoxication, binge drinking, and reaching the 0.08 BAC limit are exposing a person to great physical damage, disturbances in mental health, financial despair, strained relationships, loss of work, failure in school or other professional attempts, and legal ramifications.

Binge drinking as a pattern of alcohol consumption will progress to these dangerous levels when changes are not made.

Race is a factor in how often someone binge drinks. Whether the influence is based on genetics or on cultural norms, race does play a part in binge drinking habits.  

Members of the Caucasian (white, non-Hispanic) race have the most incidences of binge drinking at 43.8%, followed by members of the Native American race at 40.6%, those who are any part Hispanic at 31.3%, people who are any part Asian at 22.7%, and members of the African-American, or black, race at 22.5%.

Another factor is age. People under the age of 21 report a higher amount of binge drinking than those older than 21. Young people who consume large quantities of alcohol often face serious consequences related to their binge drinking behaviors. Increased involvement in property damage, problems with law enforcement, poor performance in or absence from school or at work, incidents of physical injury, cases of sexual assault, engaging in risky sexual activity, and contracting a sexually transmitted disease are all likely when binge drinking. 

Additional factors associated with binge drinking include: heredity, perception of peer alcohol consumption, personal perception of drinking, history of binge drinking, social affiliations, and peer alcohol usage. These factors contribute to the likelihood of heavy alcohol abuse.

For more information on binge drinking, or to find help for yourself or for someone you love, contact Recovery Now TV at 800-281-4731. Information, resources, and referrals are available for every level of alcohol use.

College Binge Drinking

90% of all underage drinking is done in binge drinking patterns.

On several college campuses, 70% of all students engage in binge drinking behaviors. Nationwide, 40% of male college students, and 31% of female college students, report binge drinking within the 2 weeks prior to being surveyed. Additionally, about 90% of all alcohol consumption by anyone under the legal drinking age of 21 is done so in a binge drinking fashion.

Binge drinking contributes to 1,400 deaths, 500,000 injuries, and 70,000 incidents of unwilling sexual assault annually on college campuses throughout the United States.

Binge drinking is disconcerting, not only for the potential harm to the drinker, but also for the potential harm to other people. Deadly car crashes, late night interruptions, physical and sexual assaults, and emotional abuse are just some of the ways a person who has been consuming large amounts of alcohol can affect others.

Binge drinking is even more prevalent among members of the Greek system and among student athletes than any other group of college students.

The College Alcohol Survey (CSA) of the School of Public Health studied college binge drinking and used a few different criteria to determine abuse of alcohol among college students and the formation of dependence upon alcohol while enrolled in college.

Examples of criteria used to determine alcohol abuse:

  1. Experiencing hazardous situations (physical, emotional, mental)
  2. Alcohol related school problems
  3. Interpersonal problems
  4. Legal problems
  5. Continuing to binge drink after a consequence has occurred

Examples of criteria used to determine dependence on alcohol:

  1. Spending excessive time engaged in drinking related activities
  2. Uncontrollable drinking (consuming more than planned or desired)
  3. Symptoms of high tolerance (needing more alcohol to feel the same effects)
  4. Symptoms of withdrawal when drinking stops

Because the college age bracket often think of themselves as too young to have a problem with alcohol, college students who binge drink rarely seek treatment for their dependence on or abuse of alcohol. This erroneous mentality contributes to the high rates of death, assault, and injury directly related to binge drinking on college campuses each year.

Treatment, counseling, and support groups, including involvement in a 12 Step Program, are extremely beneficial to a drinker who regularly binge drinks. In some cases, a college student need an intervention, at which point his or her family steps in to encourage abstinence and formal treatment for alcohol abuse. 

If you or someone you love is binge drinking in college, intervening before alcohol abuse progresses to addiction can be the difference between a life-long battle with alcohol and steps taken now to stop that progression.

To find out more, call Recovery Now TV today at 800-281-4731. Stop binge drinking from ruining your life, or the life of someone you love. Call today!

Alcohol & The Human Body

Approximately 30% of all hospital admissions are for the direct or indirect result of alcohol consumption.

A 23-year-old college peer counselor offers his perspective on binge drinking:

It’s no mystery why guys in college fraternities, many of whom don’t have all that much money, still come up with plenty of money to have outrageous amounts of alcohol and let any woman in for free. The whole point is they’re setting up an environment whereby people are going to get more drunk. Women’s inhibitions and a guy’s inhibitions are going to get lowered.

The desire to get drunk and to lower inhibitions does not seem like a problem: “it’s what all college kids do.” The truth is, college students do not understand what alcohol is actually doing to their bodies and brains when consumed in excess.

Alcohol is essentially a poison to the human body and brain. When alcohol enters the body, an enzyme called alcohol dehydrogenase is produced to counteract the harmful substance. The body starts working immediately to break down alcohol before it can reach the bloodstream.

The alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme is used to turn alcohol into acetaldehyde, which is toxic to the digestive system, and most importantly, to the the liver. From there, the use of the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme breaks acetaldehyde down into acetic acid, which can then be oxidized into carbon dioxide and into water.

When alcohol is consumed in a binge drinking manner, the body does not have time to break down enough of the alcohol to prevent dangerous intoxication. A binge drinker’s Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) can reach such high levels that blackouts (periods where nothing is remembered even though the person is conscious), alcohol poisoning, and overdose death have no choice but to occur. The body and the brain do not know another way to handle this much alcohol in its system.

The CDC reports that binge drinking creates the following physical risks:

  1. Unintentional injuries (e.g., car crashes, falls, burns, drowning)
  2. Intentional injuries (e.g., firearm injuries, sexual assault, domestic violence)
  3. Alcohol poisoning
  4. Sexually transmitted diseases
  5. Unintended pregnancy
  6. Children born with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders
  7. High blood pressure, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases
  8. Liver disease
  9. Neurological damage
  10. Sexual dysfunction
  11. Poor control of diabetes
When binge drinking is causing any physical or life-altering consequences, a problem exists. For more information on how you can intervene in the progression to alcoholism, call Recovery Now TV today at 800-281-4731.

Alcohol Use, Abuse, & Addiction

80% of all alcohol is consumed by 20% of people who drink.
With alcohol I was out of control because I would drink to the point where I didn’t know what I was doing, which made it easier for the man to do whatever he wanted and my not realizing it until the next day or the next morning when I woke up and didn’t have any recollection of what happened.

Sadly, this girl’s story is all too common among college students who engage in binge drinking. Thousands of college girls end up in unwanted sexual situations that lead to emotional damage, unplanned pregnancies, and unknown sexually transmitted diseases (STD).

For men, what seems like consensual sex may not actually be a fully-conscious partner. Contracting an STD, getting a girl pregnant, or being accused of rape serve as very real consequences, equally as detrimental to his future as those of a female binge drinker.

When binge drinking continues, even after an adverse life consequence has occurred because of the person’s drinking, alcohol use has reached the point of abuse.

A 15-year-old high school dropout, engaged in alcohol abuse, continued to drink after a life consequence:

I always got Bs and then my grades dropped down to Ds, and then I started failing my classes, and I skipped school, and I got suspended all the time for that when I got caught. I’d skip school and I’d go get drunk, or we’d just skip it because we were always drunk.

When alcohol abuse continues, despite even greater life consequences, plus a loss of control over drinking, an obsession with drinking, a denial of any problem with alcohol, and any effort to stop drinking ending in a binge occurs, abuse has progressed to addiction.

10% to 12% of the total 140 million drinkers in the United States have reached the point of alcoholism. This means that 14 to 17 million people are currently addicted to alcohol.

Alcoholism is an addiction to alcohol. Although legal, alcohol is no less addicting or damaging than illicit drugs like cocaine, heroin, and prescription painkillers. Life consequences are just as likely, and long-term damage is equally inevitable.

An indication of addiction is the presence of withdrawal symptoms when drinking stops.

A 32-year-old recovering female alcoholic shares her experience with alcohol withdrawal:

Your body is going through so many changes, you can hardly breathe; you’re shaking. A hangover, yeah, you might be sick for a couple of hours. That’s different than withdrawals; but with withdrawals, it will kill you.

Generally, within 24 hours of cessation from alcohol, the following symptoms occur:

  1. Rapid pulse
  2. Sweating
  3. Increased body temperature
  4. Hand tremors
  5. Anxiety
  6. Depression
  7. Insomnia
  8. Nausea or vomiting
  9. Tachycardia (irregular heartbeat)
  10. Transient visual, tactile, or auditory hallucinations and illusions
  11. Psychomotor agitation
  12. Grand mal seizures
  13. Delirium tremens

When a binge drinker experiences any of these symptoms, withdrawal cannot be done safely without medical attention. Alcohol withdrawal can be fatal and must take place in a formal detoxification treatment center where professional staff continuously monitor each client’s progress.

Binge drinking will progress to abuse and addiction when not properly stopped and treated. For referrals to alcohol detox and formal treatment facilities, call Recovery Now TV at 800-281-4731. The team is ready to help!

How Alcoholism Can Begin

Up to 86% of all college binge drinkers started these patterns in high school.
I was a city kid and was pretty much a standard rite of passage when you’re 12, 13, or 14 to, you know, one way or another get your hands on a six-pack for a Saturday night - and that’s how drinking started for all of us in my neighborhood.

- The story of a 22-year-old recovering alcoholic.

The Monitoring the Future Study, conducted by the University of Michigan, with funding with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), a division of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), found that 6.2% of all eighth graders, in the United States, had been drunk within the last 30 days. 18.8% of high school tenth graders, and 30% of all twelfth graders, also reported being drunk at least once in the last month. The percentages for daily alcohol use were much lower (0.5% of 8th graders, 1.3% of 10th graders, and 3.1% of 12th graders), revealing that high school students engage in binge drinking behaviors.

During the adolescent and early teenage years, the most emotional growth is occurring. When alcohol is used or abused during these formative years, emotional growth is then stunted, and various aspects of body and brain chemistry are impaired.

Since 44% of all college students admit to binge drinking at least once in a two-week time period, and drinking is starting in high school, the need for education and true prevention is vital to keep the youngest members of our society from destroying their lives and their health.

Binge drinking in college seems to have reached a place of social acceptance. “It’s what college students do,” but why?

One college junior shares the aspect of peer pressure contributing to binge drinking:

We drank quite a bit in my dorm, and, generally, when someone came into my dorm room on a weekend night, you had to take a bong - a beer bong. And we’d have the funnel that held like two and a half beers, and it was just the rule. We kinda pressured people to keep up, like you had to stay with the crowd.

Shauna Quinn, a drug and alcohol counselor at California State University, shares her take on college binge drinking:

Often it’s the style of drinking, not experimentation, that gets college students in trouble. Many think the name of the game is to get drunk. They drink too fast, they drink without eating, they play drinking games or contests; they binge drink. But because they drink heavily only once or twice a week, they think that there is no problem. But there usually is a problem: lower grades, disciplinary action, or behavior they regret, which usually means sexual behavior.

Binge drinking among college students is a major problem and needs to be addressed on a macro level. Several college campuses have taken the “dry” approach, where zero alcohol is permitted on campus grounds. The problem, though, is that bars and clubs are available just a block away from campus lines.

If you, or someone you love, is engaged in binge drinking, call Recovery Now TV at 800-281-4731 to find out what approach is best to stop the progression of binge drinking to life-threatening alcoholism.