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  • The Cognitive Recovery of an Alcoholic

    The Cognitive Recovery of an Alcoholic

    Excessive alcohol consumption over a long period of time is known to cause significant brain damage and even cognitive illnesses such as dementia. People that suffer from alcoholism tend to experience the worst consequences of alcohol on the brain and may show serious cognitive impairment.

  • Does Kombucha Present a Threat To Alcoholics In Recovery?

    Does Kombucha Present a Threat To Alcoholics In Recovery?

    Kombucha is a beverage that has grown in popularity over the last several years. Hailed by many as a health miracle, kombucha is a probiotic that is made of fermented mushrooms. Many people regularly drink the beverage as part of a health regimen because of the fact that it may aid in digestion and help with things like headaches and skin clarity.

  • The Stages of Recovery for an Alcoholic

    The Stages of Recovery for an Alcoholic

    Once a person struggling with addiction makes the decision to enter recovery, they must face a long and often difficult journey. Recovery does not happen overnight and everyone experiences the process differently depending on their background and the severity of addiction.

  • Breaking Down Gender Specific Challenges for Women in Addiction Treatment

    Breaking Down Gender Specific Challenges for Women in Addiction Treatment

    Women and men are different in more than just biological ways. The differences between men and women can affect the way they communicate and connect with one another. Because women have certain psychological differences than men, their specific needs can bring up issues when they are receiving addiction treatment.

  • Where to Turn When Your Solution of Alcohol Stops Working

    Where to Turn When Your Solution of Alcohol Stops Working

    When life gets overwhelming people often look to drinking as their stress reliever and consume alcohol as an escape from their problems. Drinking becomes a cycle as they look for temporary relief but never quite resolve what is bothering them.

  • 5 Most Dangerous Places For A Person In Recovery

    5 Most Dangerous Places For A Person In Recovery

    Avoiding relapse can be difficult, especially during early recovery. When a person has undergone treatment for drug or alcohol abuse or addiction, then he or she should be careful about the environments in which he or she resides to avoid temptation and relapse.

  • British Think Tank Proposing Alcohol Tax Dedicated to Funding Rehab

    British Think Tank Proposing Alcohol Tax Dedicated to Funding Rehab

    Alcohol abuse and addiction is a serious problem around the world, and alcohol causes 3.3 million deaths every year around the world. Alcohol is not the only substance abuse problem, with about 15.3 million people suffering from drug use disorders around the world.

  • The Correlation of Alcohol Abuse and Depression

    The Correlation of Alcohol Abuse and Depression

    Alcoholism is a disease that is complex and often difficult to treat because of the fact that it can have so many causes. When a person is addicted to alcohol, their brain's reward center becomes so accustomed to receiving the pleasurable feelings associated with consuming alcohol that the brain becomes entirely fixated on drinking.

  • Changing Denial Into Rational Thought

    Changing Denial Into Rational Thought

    Denial is one of the biggest impediments to overcoming addiction. In order to seek treatment, a person must admit that there is a problem. Too often, drug addicts and alcoholics get stuck believing that they do not have a problem; that they can stop any time they want, rather than recognizing that they need help to overcome a drinking or drug abuse problem.

  • 5 Truths Learned In Treatment

    5 Truths Learned In Treatment

    Many of the elements of an addiction treatment program focus on looking inwards to learn more about oneself. Therefore, when you undergo a treatment programs, you typically learn important truths about yourself, and life.

  • 5 Truths Learned In Treatment

    5 Truths Learned In Treatment

    Many of the elements of an addiction treatment program focus on looking inwards to learn more about oneself. Therefore, when you undergo a treatment programs, you typically learn important truths about yourself, and life.

  • The Truth about the Difficulties of Teen Sobriety

    The Truth about the Difficulties of Teen Sobriety

     Adolescence is the period of time when children under the age of 18 are most likely to start experimenting with drugs or alcohol. Although parents may encourage young teens to stay sober, it may be hard for them to avoid temptation in their social environment.

  • My Chemical Romance Frontman Gerard Way Talks Openly About His Relapse

    My Chemical Romance Frontman Gerard Way Talks Openly About His Relapse

    Rock stars and musicians are infamous for having drug and alcohol problems, which is one of the reasons behind the famous mantra "sex, drugs and rock and roll." However, musicians are not the only celebrities to make headlines due to their drug or alcohol abuse, a stint in rehab, or even a death caused by drugs or alcohol.

  • 5 Ways To Avoid Depression In Recovery

    5 Ways To Avoid Depression In Recovery

    It is not uncommon for people recovering from addiction to deal with some symptoms of depression and anxiety as they go through the early phases of rehab. In a lot of cases, substance abuse becomes a way for an addict to escape from existing problems with depression and abstaining from alcohol and drug use can make their symptoms come back worse than ever before.

  • Can Binge Drinking Be Reduced By Stringent Alcohol Laws?

    Can Binge Drinking Be Reduced By Stringent Alcohol Laws?

    Alcohol abuse is a serious problem that poses a very real threat to minors each year. Annually, 4,300 minors die from alcohol related causes, and countless others suffer serious injury or other major problems as a result of their excessive drinking.

  • Gospel Musician Joseph Habedank Opens up about his Addiction

    Gospel Musician Joseph Habedank Opens up about his Addiction

    Fans of the Christian gospel music group The Perrys were surprised when lead singer Joseph Habedank stepped away from the group last year under what seemed like mysterious circumstances. Fans of The Perrys were particularly surprised because of the fact that Habedank's resignation came on the heels of a very trying year for his bandmate, who had recently suffered from a stroke.

  • 5 Healthy Habits To Have In Recovery

    5 Healthy Habits To Have In Recovery

    Quitting alcohol or drug addiction can be one of the hardest choices to make because it is more than just abstinence; it is a life changing decision. Recovery is a chance for addicts to focus not only on avoiding substance abuse but also reshaping their entire life to move toward better health in both physical and mental ways.

  • 4 Reasons Why An Alcoholic Needs To Find Their Own Bottom

    4 Reasons Why An Alcoholic Needs To Find Their Own Bottom

    Watching an alcoholic struggle with alcohol addiction and the many negative effects it has on their life can be a very frustrating and terrifying process for the loved ones of an alcoholic. Addiction is a very dangerous disease for many reasons, not least of which is the fact that when a person is addicted to alcohol they often engage in behaviors that place them in jeopardy.

  • Treating Chronic Pain In Opioid Addicted Patients

    Treating Chronic Pain In Opioid Addicted Patients

    Opioid addiction is one of the fastest growing diseases in the country. Each year, thousands of people face addiction to prescription painkillers or heroin, which is made from the same substance as painkillers like vicodin. Opiates are a highly addictive drug that also carry with them serious risks for overdose and other severe health issues.

  • Chinese Boy’s Alcohol Addiction A Scary Reality

    Chinese Boy’s Alcohol Addiction A Scary Reality

    Proving that no one is too young to suffer from alcoholism, Cheng Cheng, a two year old boy in China has sparked quite a bit of concern after pictures of him drinking alcohol have surfaced. The boy's parents, who are under investigation by local authorities, report that he is in fact addicted to alcohol, and that he can drink as much as a bottle of beer without any noticeable effects.

  • An Explanation Of Alcoholic Delirium Tremens

    An Explanation Of Alcoholic Delirium Tremens

    Alcohol is considered by many addiction experts to be one of the most difficult
    to withdraw from. For this reason, it is always advised that a person who is addicted to alcohol go through the process of detoxing while under the supervision of a qualified medical staff.

  • Health Canada Changes Labeling for Prescription Narcotics

    Health Canada Changes Labeling for Prescription Narcotics

    As prescription drug abuse and addiction continues to be a growing problem that plagues states across the U.S.A., many state and local governments have taken steps to attempt to reduce the number of people suffering major health risks and even death as a result of dependence on pills like opiates. It seems that the U.S.'s neighbor to the north, Canada, is the most recent region to take a strong stand in the fight against prescription drug addiction.

  • Drug Addicted Adolescents At Great Risk Of Physical Consequences

    Drug Addicted Adolescents At Great Risk Of Physical Consequences

    Addiction is a serious disease that can truly devastate the life of the person who is caught in its grasp. When a person is addicted to drugs or alcohol, their mind and body suffer serious consequences that can even be fatal if a person continues down the path of drug use.

  • Physical Dependence On Alcohol Creates Wreckage

    Physical Dependence On Alcohol Creates Wreckage

    Alcoholism is a serious disease that causes major damage to virtually every part of a person’s physical, mental, and emotional health. When a person becomes addicted to alcohol, their brain’s reward center becomes accustomed to experiencing the pleasurable effects of alcohol and actual rewires the neurons of the brain so that it is completely focused on finding and using more alcohol.

  • Supporting Somebody In Recovery

    Supporting Somebody In Recovery

    One of the most important tools in any recovering addict’s life is a strong support system that can help them through difficult times and encourage them to keep working toward their goals so that they can live a healthy and sober life.

  • Alcohol And Energy Drink Combo Increases Desire For More

    Alcohol And Energy Drink Combo Increases Desire For More

    Energy drinks have been paired with alcoholic beverages almost since their inceptions. These drinks, which are often carbonated and sugary, also contain high amounts of caffeine and B12, which make them a potent force for energy.

  • Vermont is Now Treating Heroin Abuse as a “Health Issue”

    Vermont is Now Treating Heroin Abuse as a “Health Issue”

    As heroin abuse and addiction continues to be a rampant problem that threatens the health, well being, and livelihood of countless individuals, governments, health institutions, parents, and educators alike, along with local law enforcement agencies, are struggling to find the solutions that will lead to real change in the number of people who suffer from hospitalization or death as a result of heroin addiction. In recent years, addiction to this lethal and highly addictive drug as skyrocketed at such a pace that it is considered an epidemic.

  • 5 Tips On How To Handle Alcoholism And Depression

    5 Tips On How To Handle Alcoholism And Depression

    Alcoholism and depression are what are often referred to as co-occurring disorders because many people who suffer from alcohol addiction also suffer from depression, and being depressed may put a person at higher risk for alcoholism and depression can be a major trigger for drinking.

  • NY Legislation To Improve Treatment For Heroin And Opioid Addiction

    NY Legislation To Improve Treatment For Heroin And Opioid Addiction

    New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo addressed what has been described by many as a rampant heroin epidemic on June 24, 2014. Heroin and opiate overdoses have rapidly become one of the most fast-growing causes of death in recent years, and many regions are struggling with ways in which this dangerous problem may be addressed.

  • Are Stressed Out Parents Getting Addicted By Mistake?

    Are Stressed Out Parents Getting Addicted By Mistake?

    Any parent knows that raising children is one of the hardest jobs that anyone could ever have. There is no question that with parenting comes a tremendous amount of stressors, but are parents dealing with stress in an unhealthy way?

  • Child Development Problems A Result Of Pre-Pregnancy Drinking

    Child Development Problems A Result Of Pre-Pregnancy Drinking

    Most women are well-aware that drinking during pregnancy can put their child at risk for developing fetal alcohol syndrome and other birth defects. However, new research indicates that even pre-pregnancy drinking can also lead to certain developmental problems especially if the mother struggles with addiction or binge drinking.

  • Suspended Cleveland Brown’s Josh Gordon Learning Accountability

    Suspended Cleveland Brown’s Josh Gordon Learning Accountability

    Josh Gordon, who plays as a receiver for the Cleveland Browns has been served a strong dose of reality after a recent decision from the NFL has ruled that he is to serve a season-long suspension from the NFL after failing yet another drug test and testing positive for marijuana. This is not the first time the All-Pro player has tested positive for the drug. In fact, during his career he has tested positive for marijuana a whopping seventy times.

  • Does Social Anxiety Lead To Alcohol Use and Abuse?

    Does Social Anxiety Lead To Alcohol Use and Abuse?

    A number of mental health problems are associated with alcohol addiction and social anxiety is no exception. People with social anxiety can be particularly prone problem drinking because alcohol is commonly used to loosen up in social situations.

  • A Fine Line Separates those Who Use and Abuse Prescription Drugs

    A Fine Line Separates those Who Use and Abuse Prescription Drugs

    According to a 2008 survey by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 52 million people in the U.S. have used a prescription drug for a nonmedical purpose at least once. Thus, the misuse of prescription drugs is something a large group of people has engaged in, and it's growing.

Binge Drinking

Binge drinking = 5 or more drinks in one sitting for a man and 4 or more drinks in one sitting for a woman.

Binge drinking is defined as the consumption of 5 or more alcoholic beverages at one time, for an adult male, and 4 or more for an adult female, at least once during the preceding two-week period. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) adds that binge drinking includes a person reaching a Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) of 0.08 or higher, which usually occurs when four or five drinks are consumed within two hours.

The NIAAA reports that one in every six adults in the United States binge drinks around four times every month, consuming an average of eight drinks per binge.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report the following statistics on binge drinking:

  1. Of all adults in the U.S. who drink excessively, approximately 92% have engaged in binge drinking within the last 30 days.
  2. Over 50% of all alcohol consumption in the U.S. is done in a binge drinking manner.
  3. Men report binge drinking twice as often as women.
  4. Binge drinkers admit to alcohol-impaired or drunk driving 14 times more than those who do not binge drink.
  5. Even though binge drinking is most common in the 18-34 age bracket (binge drinking four times each month), those who are 65 and older actually binge drink more often, estimated at five or six times each month.
  6. Income affects binge drinking rates: In households making at least $75,000, binge drinking is much more prevalent than in households earning a lower income.
  7. While binge drinking is most often associated with college students, 70% of all binge episodes actually occur among people aged 26 years and older.
  8. 67% of male sexual aggressors, and 50% of their victims, had been drinking at the time of the attack and sexual assault.

Alcohol is a dangerous drug, the effects of which are greatly overlooked. Drinking to the point of intoxication, binge drinking, and reaching the 0.08 BAC limit are exposing a person to great physical damage, disturbances in mental health, financial despair, strained relationships, loss of work, failure in school or other professional attempts, and legal ramifications.

Binge drinking as a pattern of alcohol consumption will progress to these dangerous levels when changes are not made.

Race is a factor in how often someone binge drinks. Whether the influence is based on genetics or on cultural norms, race does play a part in binge drinking habits.  

Members of the Caucasian (white, non-Hispanic) race have the most incidences of binge drinking at 43.8%, followed by members of the Native American race at 40.6%, those who are any part Hispanic at 31.3%, people who are any part Asian at 22.7%, and members of the African-American, or black, race at 22.5%.

Another factor is age. People under the age of 21 report a higher amount of binge drinking than those older than 21. Young people who consume large quantities of alcohol often face serious consequences related to their binge drinking behaviors. Increased involvement in property damage, problems with law enforcement, poor performance in or absence from school or at work, incidents of physical injury, cases of sexual assault, engaging in risky sexual activity, and contracting a sexually transmitted disease are all likely when binge drinking. 

Additional factors associated with binge drinking include: heredity, perception of peer alcohol consumption, personal perception of drinking, history of binge drinking, social affiliations, and peer alcohol usage. These factors contribute to the likelihood of heavy alcohol abuse.

For more information on binge drinking, or to find help for yourself or for someone you love, contact Recovery Now TV at 800-281-4731. Information, resources, and referrals are available for every level of alcohol use.

College Binge Drinking

90% of all underage drinking is done in binge drinking patterns.

On several college campuses, 70% of all students engage in binge drinking behaviors. Nationwide, 40% of male college students, and 31% of female college students, report binge drinking within the 2 weeks prior to being surveyed. Additionally, about 90% of all alcohol consumption by anyone under the legal drinking age of 21 is done so in a binge drinking fashion.

Binge drinking contributes to 1,400 deaths, 500,000 injuries, and 70,000 incidents of unwilling sexual assault annually on college campuses throughout the United States.

Binge drinking is disconcerting, not only for the potential harm to the drinker, but also for the potential harm to other people. Deadly car crashes, late night interruptions, physical and sexual assaults, and emotional abuse are just some of the ways a person who has been consuming large amounts of alcohol can affect others.

Binge drinking is even more prevalent among members of the Greek system and among student athletes than any other group of college students.

The College Alcohol Survey (CSA) of the School of Public Health studied college binge drinking and used a few different criteria to determine abuse of alcohol among college students and the formation of dependence upon alcohol while enrolled in college.

Examples of criteria used to determine alcohol abuse:

  1. Experiencing hazardous situations (physical, emotional, mental)
  2. Alcohol related school problems
  3. Interpersonal problems
  4. Legal problems
  5. Continuing to binge drink after a consequence has occurred

Examples of criteria used to determine dependence on alcohol:

  1. Spending excessive time engaged in drinking related activities
  2. Uncontrollable drinking (consuming more than planned or desired)
  3. Symptoms of high tolerance (needing more alcohol to feel the same effects)
  4. Symptoms of withdrawal when drinking stops

Because the college age bracket often think of themselves as too young to have a problem with alcohol, college students who binge drink rarely seek treatment for their dependence on or abuse of alcohol. This erroneous mentality contributes to the high rates of death, assault, and injury directly related to binge drinking on college campuses each year.

Treatment, counseling, and support groups, including involvement in a 12 Step Program, are extremely beneficial to a drinker who regularly binge drinks. In some cases, a college student need an intervention, at which point his or her family steps in to encourage abstinence and formal treatment for alcohol abuse. 

If you or someone you love is binge drinking in college, intervening before alcohol abuse progresses to addiction can be the difference between a life-long battle with alcohol and steps taken now to stop that progression.

To find out more, call Recovery Now TV today at 800-281-4731. Stop binge drinking from ruining your life, or the life of someone you love. Call today!

Alcohol & The Human Body

Approximately 30% of all hospital admissions are for the direct or indirect result of alcohol consumption.

A 23-year-old college peer counselor offers his perspective on binge drinking:

It’s no mystery why guys in college fraternities, many of whom don’t have all that much money, still come up with plenty of money to have outrageous amounts of alcohol and let any woman in for free. The whole point is they’re setting up an environment whereby people are going to get more drunk. Women’s inhibitions and a guy’s inhibitions are going to get lowered.

The desire to get drunk and to lower inhibitions does not seem like a problem: “it’s what all college kids do.” The truth is, college students do not understand what alcohol is actually doing to their bodies and brains when consumed in excess.

Alcohol is essentially a poison to the human body and brain. When alcohol enters the body, an enzyme called alcohol dehydrogenase is produced to counteract the harmful substance. The body starts working immediately to break down alcohol before it can reach the bloodstream.

The alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme is used to turn alcohol into acetaldehyde, which is toxic to the digestive system, and most importantly, to the the liver. From there, the use of the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme breaks acetaldehyde down into acetic acid, which can then be oxidized into carbon dioxide and into water.

When alcohol is consumed in a binge drinking manner, the body does not have time to break down enough of the alcohol to prevent dangerous intoxication. A binge drinker’s Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) can reach such high levels that blackouts (periods where nothing is remembered even though the person is conscious), alcohol poisoning, and overdose death have no choice but to occur. The body and the brain do not know another way to handle this much alcohol in its system.

The CDC reports that binge drinking creates the following physical risks:

  1. Unintentional injuries (e.g., car crashes, falls, burns, drowning)
  2. Intentional injuries (e.g., firearm injuries, sexual assault, domestic violence)
  3. Alcohol poisoning
  4. Sexually transmitted diseases
  5. Unintended pregnancy
  6. Children born with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders
  7. High blood pressure, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases
  8. Liver disease
  9. Neurological damage
  10. Sexual dysfunction
  11. Poor control of diabetes
When binge drinking is causing any physical or life-altering consequences, a problem exists. For more information on how you can intervene in the progression to alcoholism, call Recovery Now TV today at 800-281-4731.

Alcohol Use, Abuse, & Addiction

80% of all alcohol is consumed by 20% of people who drink.
With alcohol I was out of control because I would drink to the point where I didn’t know what I was doing, which made it easier for the man to do whatever he wanted and my not realizing it until the next day or the next morning when I woke up and didn’t have any recollection of what happened.

Sadly, this girl’s story is all too common among college students who engage in binge drinking. Thousands of college girls end up in unwanted sexual situations that lead to emotional damage, unplanned pregnancies, and unknown sexually transmitted diseases (STD).

For men, what seems like consensual sex may not actually be a fully-conscious partner. Contracting an STD, getting a girl pregnant, or being accused of rape serve as very real consequences, equally as detrimental to his future as those of a female binge drinker.

When binge drinking continues, even after an adverse life consequence has occurred because of the person’s drinking, alcohol use has reached the point of abuse.

A 15-year-old high school dropout, engaged in alcohol abuse, continued to drink after a life consequence:

I always got Bs and then my grades dropped down to Ds, and then I started failing my classes, and I skipped school, and I got suspended all the time for that when I got caught. I’d skip school and I’d go get drunk, or we’d just skip it because we were always drunk.

When alcohol abuse continues, despite even greater life consequences, plus a loss of control over drinking, an obsession with drinking, a denial of any problem with alcohol, and any effort to stop drinking ending in a binge occurs, abuse has progressed to addiction.

10% to 12% of the total 140 million drinkers in the United States have reached the point of alcoholism. This means that 14 to 17 million people are currently addicted to alcohol.

Alcoholism is an addiction to alcohol. Although legal, alcohol is no less addicting or damaging than illicit drugs like cocaine, heroin, and prescription painkillers. Life consequences are just as likely, and long-term damage is equally inevitable.

An indication of addiction is the presence of withdrawal symptoms when drinking stops.

A 32-year-old recovering female alcoholic shares her experience with alcohol withdrawal:

Your body is going through so many changes, you can hardly breathe; you’re shaking. A hangover, yeah, you might be sick for a couple of hours. That’s different than withdrawals; but with withdrawals, it will kill you.

Generally, within 24 hours of cessation from alcohol, the following symptoms occur:

  1. Rapid pulse
  2. Sweating
  3. Increased body temperature
  4. Hand tremors
  5. Anxiety
  6. Depression
  7. Insomnia
  8. Nausea or vomiting
  9. Tachycardia (irregular heartbeat)
  10. Transient visual, tactile, or auditory hallucinations and illusions
  11. Psychomotor agitation
  12. Grand mal seizures
  13. Delirium tremens

When a binge drinker experiences any of these symptoms, withdrawal cannot be done safely without medical attention. Alcohol withdrawal can be fatal and must take place in a formal detoxification treatment center where professional staff continuously monitor each client’s progress.

Binge drinking will progress to abuse and addiction when not properly stopped and treated. For referrals to alcohol detox and formal treatment facilities, call Recovery Now TV at 800-281-4731. The team is ready to help!

How Alcoholism Can Begin

Up to 86% of all college binge drinkers started these patterns in high school.
I was a city kid and was pretty much a standard rite of passage when you’re 12, 13, or 14 to, you know, one way or another get your hands on a six-pack for a Saturday night - and that’s how drinking started for all of us in my neighborhood.

- The story of a 22-year-old recovering alcoholic.

The Monitoring the Future Study, conducted by the University of Michigan, with funding with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), a division of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), found that 6.2% of all eighth graders, in the United States, had been drunk within the last 30 days. 18.8% of high school tenth graders, and 30% of all twelfth graders, also reported being drunk at least once in the last month. The percentages for daily alcohol use were much lower (0.5% of 8th graders, 1.3% of 10th graders, and 3.1% of 12th graders), revealing that high school students engage in binge drinking behaviors.

During the adolescent and early teenage years, the most emotional growth is occurring. When alcohol is used or abused during these formative years, emotional growth is then stunted, and various aspects of body and brain chemistry are impaired.

Since 44% of all college students admit to binge drinking at least once in a two-week time period, and drinking is starting in high school, the need for education and true prevention is vital to keep the youngest members of our society from destroying their lives and their health.

Binge drinking in college seems to have reached a place of social acceptance. “It’s what college students do,” but why?

One college junior shares the aspect of peer pressure contributing to binge drinking:

We drank quite a bit in my dorm, and, generally, when someone came into my dorm room on a weekend night, you had to take a bong - a beer bong. And we’d have the funnel that held like two and a half beers, and it was just the rule. We kinda pressured people to keep up, like you had to stay with the crowd.

Shauna Quinn, a drug and alcohol counselor at California State University, shares her take on college binge drinking:

Often it’s the style of drinking, not experimentation, that gets college students in trouble. Many think the name of the game is to get drunk. They drink too fast, they drink without eating, they play drinking games or contests; they binge drink. But because they drink heavily only once or twice a week, they think that there is no problem. But there usually is a problem: lower grades, disciplinary action, or behavior they regret, which usually means sexual behavior.

Binge drinking among college students is a major problem and needs to be addressed on a macro level. Several college campuses have taken the “dry” approach, where zero alcohol is permitted on campus grounds. The problem, though, is that bars and clubs are available just a block away from campus lines.

If you, or someone you love, is engaged in binge drinking, call Recovery Now TV at 800-281-4731 to find out what approach is best to stop the progression of binge drinking to life-threatening alcoholism.