Berkley, Michigan Woman Died Of Alcohol-Withdrawal While In Police Custody

Written by DeShawn McQueen on Thursday, 12 July 2012. Posted in Breaking News, Alcohol

alcohol poisoning death

In the Midwest, a woman died of alcohol poisoning after she was denied care in a Berkley, Michigan jail cell. Reports reveal that the woman slipped into a series of convulsions while in her jail cell at the police station after her requests for medical assistance fell on deaf ears. Ultimately, according to a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the family [as well as an autopsy report] of the victim she died of alcohol poisoning.

Alcohol poisoning occurs when the victim consumes a toxic amount of alcohol during a relatively short duration of time. Generally, the victim will display symptoms such as: breathing in a shallow manner; appearing disoriented; he may be even be unconscious or unresponsive. All cases of alcohol poisoning require emergency medical treatment, and in severe cases death frequently occurs.

Attorneys of the children of then forty-seven year old Lisa Kindl allege that Kindl died two years ago after Berkley police officers refused her emergency medical treatment despite her many requests to officers over a span of several hours.

According to the lawsuit Mrs. Kindl was an alcoholic of the chronic and serious kind as she was known to be by the court system when she was taken into custody after results of her routinely scheduled alcohol detection test came back positive following a probation meeting.

The legal complaint alleges that on the morning of July 12, 2010 Kindl informed police officers that she might experience Delirium Tremens, [or “DTs” as they are often referred to] as they processed her paperwork and booked her.

Delirium Tremens are the most severe form of alcohol withdrawal that occurs after the last drink. It is an incredibly serious condition which causes a tremendously dangerous change in breathing, body temperature and circulation. Commonly, heartbeat excessively accelerates, blood pressure rises dramatically, dehydration occurs, and a temporary reduction of blood flow to the brain occurs. Other symptoms include confusion, loss of consciousness, sleep disturbances, hallucinations, nervous and angry behavior, as well as sweating and irrational beliefs; death may even occur. Furthermore, the lawsuit alleges that as many as 14 officers were aware of Mrs. Kindl’s condition.

Attorneys on behalf of Kindl’s family have questioned the police offers although they apparently have received more questions than answers. Meanwhile, an internal investigation by police is expected to reveal more information.

Accounts show that Mrs. Kindl was arrested and taken into custody at approximately 9:30 on the morning of July 12, 2010. At that time an alcohol detection reading registered her blood alcohol level at .057. The blood alcohol level of Mrs. Kindl was in violation of a bond connected to another drinking-related case she was involved in.

According to a sheriff’s surveillance video Kindl suffered what appeared to be a seizure [yet officers refused to offer assistance] and within twenty-one hours after being arrested, officers looked in her cell to not only find that her face and hands were purple but that she was in fact dead.

Autopsy reports revealed that she died of Acute Alcohol Poisoning.

If you or someone you know needs help quiting alcohol, please contact us.

Original article: detroitnews.com/

About the Author

DeShawn McQueen

DeShawn McQueen

DeShawn McQueen is a staff writer at Recovery Now Newspaper and Recoverynowtv.com, an informative newspaper that serves as a resource for persons of all stages of drug and alcohol treatment, by giving them access to relevant and necessary information so that they may live balanced and substance-free lifestyles. DeShawn graduated from Wayne State University with Bachelor of Science degrees in psychology and premedical sciences. He holds a Juris Doctors degree in law from Valparaiso University School of Law. DeShawn’s writing and research has been published in such academic journals as Behavioral Pharmacology and Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior among others. He lives in Los Angeles, California.

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