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Recovery Now TV is designed to build awareness surrounding the recovery from drug and alcohol addiction. We believe that treatment and recovery WORKS. The video content and the dialogue between people who have recovered brings hope to those who are still struggling with their addiction.

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  • Dealing with Alcohol in the House as an Alcoholic

    Dealing with Alcohol in the House as an Alcoholic

    Once an alcohol leaves their rehab program, they still face many challenges in maintaining their sobriety and continue to struggle to live their alcohol and drug-free lifestyle. If you are an alcoholic and you are moving back home with your family then you will have to take some time discuss the changes you have made with everyone in the household.

  • Take a Look at the Psychological Effects of Your Drinking

    Take a Look at the Psychological Effects of Your Drinking

    Alcoholism would not exist unless alcohol produced some "good feelings," or states of being that may seem fun, desirable, or a numbing of unresolved pain. However, a closer look at the psychological effects of drinking paint a much more complex and potentially dangerous picture.

  • 5 Reasons High Functioning Alcoholics still Find Their Bottom Eventually

    5 Reasons High Functioning Alcoholics still Find Their Bottom Eventually

    There is a stereotype of "alcoholics" that is often untrue and unhelpful, of violent and impoverished people who spend all of their days too drunk to function. The truth is that there are many people, called high functioning alcoholics, with out of control drinking who are nevertheless able to maintain a presentable face to the world, having a life that, to an outsider, looks good.

  • Ultra Potent New Research Chemical Benzo Flubromazepam

    Ultra Potent New Research Chemical Benzo Flubromazepam

    Benzodiazepines are a type of tranquilizer drug that is available as prescription medication but also in the form of research chemicals for experimentation and study. A new benzodiazepine derivative known as Flubromazepam has entered the market recently and is being sold in internet shops as a research chemical.

  • Why Alcoholism and Anorexia are Common in Young Adults

    Why Alcoholism and Anorexia are Common in Young Adults

    Anorexia is an eating disorder characterized by tight control over eating, to the point of avoiding food and an obsession with weight. Alcoholism is characterized by an out-of-control consumption of alcoholic beverages, drinking to the point of getting drunk compulsively.

  • Swedish Dance Club Goes Dry for a Night

    Swedish Dance Club Goes Dry for a Night

    Some people may be aware of how their drinking may be causing problems, for their health and their behavior, but are afraid of the process of recovery, thinking that sobriety will take them out of social settings where they have fun. Other people would not normally be interested in drinking to excess, but may consider it a requirement to be a part of social circles they are attracted to, that involve late night music and dancing.

  • What to Worry About When Detoxing from Alcohol

    What to Worry About When Detoxing from Alcohol

    Entering a treatment center and undergoing the process of detox for the first time can be an intimidating experience, especially if you don't know what to expect. It can help you feel more prepared for the first phase of recovery if you have a better idea of what your body will be going through and the best ways to handle certain situations that can come up.

  • Amanda Bynes Arrested for Suspicion of DUI

    Amanda Bynes Arrested for Suspicion of DUI

    Child actor Amanda Bynes has run into legal trouble yet again after she was arrested on suspicion of a DUI in Sherman Oaks, CA. The young starlet was taken into custody after police arrested her for not being able to pass a field sobriety test.

  • Denial Plays A Substantial Role in Alcoholism

    Denial Plays A Substantial Role in Alcoholism

    Alcoholism is a dangerous and often terrifying disease for a number of reasons, not least of which is the fact that when a person is addicted to alcohol, they often engage in highly risky behaviors, often blacking out and feeling extremely powerless while drinking.

  • Why is the U.S. 80% of the Worlds Prescription Drug Consumption?

    Why is the U.S. 80% of the Worlds Prescription Drug Consumption?

    Current estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau place U.S. population at around 319 million people, or slightly more then 4 percent of the people on earth. Thus, it is astounding that, according to congregational testimony by the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians, this one nation results in 80 percent of the consumption of prescription pain killers in the world.

  • Approaching a Person in Active Alcoholism

    Approaching a Person in Active Alcoholism

    When someone close to you is suffering from an addiction, it is never easy to confront them about their behavior and ask them to seek help. For family members and close friends, seeing someone in their life struggle with alcoholism is painful but they may not know what to do to stop it.

  • What You Need To Know About Methadone Maintenance

    What You Need To Know About Methadone Maintenance

    If you have been considering methadone treatment, or if you are an addict who is ready to seek help for your addiction to heroin or opiates, there are a few things you should know about methadone and a methadone maintenance program. Methadone maintenance can be a highly effective way of recovering from addiction, but there are risks inherent to methadone use that you should be aware of before you begin treatment.

  • 5 Ways Treatment Changes Your Perspective

    5 Ways Treatment Changes Your Perspective

    Recovering from drug and alcohol addiction is an incredibly transformative experience that changes virtually everything about the way an addict perceives and experiences the world. When a person is addicted to drugs or alcohol, they very frequently find that their priorities shift so that they are entirely consumed with using.

  • Does a Drug Taper Off Help before Detox?

    Does a Drug Taper Off Help before Detox?

    When an addict is ready to stop using drugs, one of the first things they must do is to detox. During detox, an addict, under the support of a medical staff, completely stops using and allows the dangerous drugs to leave their system. 

  • Dealing with Spousal Alcoholism and Addiction

    Dealing with Spousal Alcoholism and Addiction

    People struggling with addiction are not only harming their own bodies and minds, but they are also hurt the people around them and their relationships. Marriage is one relationship that can be especially strained through the pain of addiction, turning a happy home into a nightmare.

  • How to Stay Sober at Music Festivals

    How to Stay Sober at Music Festivals

    Music festivals can be very joyous and fun occasions, providing the opportunity to hear favorite bands and experience community in a new, exciting atmosphere. However, often these festivals are not only about the music itself, but also places for high levels of alcohol and drug use.

  • 5 Tools to Help Keep You Sober

    5 Tools to Help Keep You Sober

    Even after long periods of abstaining from our addictions, staying sober can be a challenge, and there may be periods where it feels like a difficult struggle. However, the truth is that it does not have to be a daily hardship, or feel like more then you can bear.

  • Prevent Substance Abuse by Understanding Drug Slang

    Prevent Substance Abuse by Understanding Drug Slang

    The central way to prevent drug abuse is with responsible education. By cultivating an awareness of what drugs are and the harm they can cause, you can work to prevent what may at first seem like harmless experimentation, but will lead to dangerous, compulsive addiction.

  • Surgery and Pain Medication Use in Recovery

    Surgery and Pain Medication Use in Recovery

    Opioid pain relievers have a very high potential for abuse, and can be very dangerous if taken beyond recommended doses, or for purposes other then their intended use. However, they can also be extremely useful in controlling otherwise unbearable pain, and allowing someone with chronic pain or recovering from extensive surgery to function

  • Painkiller Opana Quickly Rising In Use Around The Nation

    Painkiller Opana Quickly Rising In Use Around The Nation

    Prescription drug use has, for the past several years, been the nation's fastest growing and most dangerous drug epidemic. As deaths and hospitalizations continue to be on the rise in almost every state, legislatures and hospitals are working together to try to find ways to reduce the number of addictions and overdoses due to these dangerous drugs.

  • 5 Tips on Rebuilding Self-Esteem in Recovery

    5 Tips on Rebuilding Self-Esteem in Recovery

    Recovering from an addiction is a long emotional journey that can require a lot of personal growth to get back on track. Addicts most often suffer from issues of low self-esteem because their substance abuse has taken its toll on them psychologically.

  •  Let Your Actions In Sobriety Speak For Themselves

    Let Your Actions In Sobriety Speak For Themselves

    For a recovering addict, becoming sober means finding a whole new outlook on life and behaving completely differently than one did while they were struggling with addiction. This is why sobriety is a lifelong journey and not simply a quick fix.

  • Do Dry Drunks Suffer More In or Out of Recovery

    Do Dry Drunks Suffer More In or Out of Recovery

    There are numerous different aspects of recovering from an addiction and quitting the substance abuse itself is only the first step. Some people in recovery might focus solely on their abstinence but fail to make progress in other areas of their life that also contribute to their disease.

  • Is There Such A Thing As A 'Recovered Alcoholic'?

    Is There Such A Thing As A 'Recovered Alcoholic'?

    In the recovery community, it is very common to refer to a person who is sober as "recovering," regardless of how long they have been sober for. Some people, both in the recovery community and outside of it, may wonder whether this is an appropriate term, since it may seem in the instance of a person who has not had alcohol for a very long time that they are no longer recovering but recovered. 

    This has led many people to pose the question of whether there exists a person who is actually a recovered alcoholic.

     

  • Why Emotional Sobriety Plays Such A Large Role In Recovery

    Why Emotional Sobriety Plays Such A Large Role In Recovery

    Getting healthy and sober means truly changing the way in which you think and behave. Of course, one of the biggest components to sobriety is abstaining from controlled substances, but it is also highly important that a recovering addict work to achieve what is called emotional sobriety. Maintaining emotional sobriety is an integral part of being healthy and drug and alcohol free. Here are a few reasons why emotional sobriety is such an important part of recovery.

  • Parental Influence On Alcohol Use And Abuse In The Household

    Parental Influence On Alcohol Use And Abuse In The Household

    There are many factors that may impact the likelihood that a teen will suffer from alcoholism. Environmental factors, such as the company a child keeps at school, as well as genetic factors, such as how predisposed the child is to alcoholism, will all play a large role in determining whether a teen will become addicted to alcohol.

  • Gene Found that Could Increase Risk of Alcoholism

    Gene Found that Could Increase Risk of Alcoholism

    Researchers have long known there was a link between genetics and alcoholism, but the exact genes involved are still being discovered. A recent study, published in Psychiatric Genetics and undertaken by researchers at the University College London in the U.K., has found a rare gene variant that could increase the risk of a person developing alcoholism, as well as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

  • Simultaneously Dealing with Addiction and Depression

    Simultaneously Dealing with Addiction and Depression

    Because of the way that addiction and mental health problems are closely related, it is very common for patients in rehab to require treatment for both substance abuse and issues of depression. When you are focusing on recovery it can be difficult to simultaneously battle symptoms of depression which often contribute to the cycle of abuse.

  • How To Mend Irreparable Relationships In Recovery

    How To Mend Irreparable Relationships In Recovery

    Addiction is a damaging disease that impacts the life of an addict and every person around them in a very severe way. When a person becomes addicted to drugs or alcohol, their brain's reward center becomes so singularly focused on finding and consuming more drugs and alcohol that all of the important relationships in their life become secondary.

  • Alcoholic Neuropathy's Impact On The Body

    Alcoholic Neuropathy's Impact On The Body

    Alcohol abuse and addiction contribute to many health problems, including alcoholic neuropathy. More than half of heavy drinkers develop neuropathy, and those with the highest risk are alcoholics who have been abusing the substance for more than ten years.

  • 5 of the Best Affirmations for Alcoholics

    5 of the Best Affirmations for Alcoholics

    Affirmations play an important role in recovery from alcohol abuse and addiction. The brain is the most powerful tool a person has in recovery, and using supportive, positive affirmations can help a person to find the strength to overcome his or her problem.

  • What a Dry Alcoholic Looks Like

    What a Dry Alcoholic Looks Like

    Recovery from alcoholism can be difficult, but most people find a new lease on life when they enter recovery. However, many alcoholics face a common problem known as dry drunk syndrome.

  • 7 Things That Need To Change In Sobriety

    7 Things That Need To Change In Sobriety

    Making the decision to get sober is, in effect, making the decision to totally transform your entire way of life and way of thinking. In sobriety, you will undergo a total change that involves you ridding yourself of the behaviors and negative thoughts that have, until this point, been preventing you from living a happy and healthy life.

  • How to Handle Sleep Problems in Recovery

    How to Handle Sleep Problems in Recovery

    The first few months of recovering from an addiction can involve a number of difficult withdrawal symptoms as well as physical and emotional problems to overcome. One of the most common complaints among recovering addicts is difficulty sleeping especially in the first few weeks of abstinence.

  • Why an Alcoholic Needs To Be Held Accountable

    Why an Alcoholic Needs To Be Held Accountable

    After an alcoholic finally reaches out for help and enters rehab treatment for their problem, there are a number of important values and skills that they must focus on to remain sober. One of the most crucial aspects of their journey to recovery is to develop accountability not just to their supervisors in treatment but to everyone in their life.

  • What Is Responsible For the Rise of Binge Drinking?

    What Is Responsible For the Rise of Binge Drinking?

    In the past decade, the instances of binge drinking among Americans has risen significantly especially with those who are college students between the ages of 18 and 20. Recent data from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism shows that while the incidence of regular drinking has remained stable over the years, there has been a sharp increase in the incidence of binge drinking.

  • Understanding The Stigma Of Relationships In Sobriety

    Understanding The Stigma Of Relationships In Sobriety

    When it comes to relationships while in sobriety, most therapists and counselors recommend that newly recovered addicts abstain from becoming involved in a romantic relationship for at least the first year of sobriety. Because of this, there is a kind of stigma around relationships that exists within the recovery community.

12-Step Recovery Programs

The first four steps can establish a tremendous foundation for recovery with the creation of a connection to a higher power. The remaining 12 Steps focus on using that power to aid in personal work that sustains abstinence from drug and alcohol addiction.

12 steps to recovery, freedom, and life without alcohol, drugs, gambling, overeating or other dependencies. 12 steps to finding a power outside yourself that will guide you through choices without the use of drugs and alcohol. 12 steps to follow when the process feels overwhelming and nearly impossible.

The 12 Steps, originally created and used by the Alcoholics Anonymous fellowship, are a collection of ways to successfully move through the recovery process. In 1934, two alcoholics, Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith, created the program as a way to keep themselves sober, and to help others do the same. The 12 Steps have been embraced by recovery communities and hundreds of support groups since its creation as a means of conquering alcoholism, drug addiction, and several other disorders (eating disorders, codependency, and various behavioral addictions, to name a few.)

The 12 Steps are used as a model in many drug and alcohol treatment facilities. With a disease model of addiction that believes that the continued use of psychoactive, addictive drugs will progress to abuse and onto addiction (leading to a disease that needs treatment) rehab centers utilize the 12 Steps as a set of tools to navigate recovery from the disease.

The 12 steps are an ongoing process that help sustain abstinence from alcohol and other drugs when committed to and constantly put into practice. The steps help identify the roots of substance abuse, and propose a method to begin healing. The causes of one’s addiction are identified, and alternative coping skills, without drugs and alcohol, are presented. 12 step recovery programs encourage an addicted person to take action toward a solution by taking action, examining past behavioral choices, and choosing to live a better life each day.

What are the 12 Steps?

The 12 Steps, listed below, are designed to be done in order. The steps can be done over and over again, and there is not a preset timeline for completion.

  1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol (and/or drugs) - that our lives had become unmanageable.
  2. Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
  3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
  4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  5. Admitted to God, to ourselves and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
  6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
  8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
  9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
  11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

The first four steps can establish a tremendous foundation for recovery.

The first step is about identifying the true problem that led to chemical dependence, breaking through denial, and being really honest with oneself. Members of the 12 Step Fellowship often believe that half the battle against addiction is admitting the problem: a powerlessness over substance use. The ability to be honest allows for a return to integrity, and to finding a solution to living without drugs and alcohol. Facing reality is so important after years of drug and alcohol abuse, often paired with other high-risk compulsive behaviors, in which time was spent running away from reality. By being truthful, many choices appear and a set of real solutions to the problem can be found and implemented.

The second step deals with finding a source of inspiration and guidance outside of oneself. Creating faith in a solution and believing that recovery is possible is vitally important to stop using substances indefinitely. Once the truth of complete powerlessness is realized, understood, and accepted, the 12 Steps steer an individual toward trust and faith in something greater than him or herself. Addicts and alcoholics try exerting self-discipline and willpower during active substance use many times, but always failed because drugs and alcohol had control. Working through the second step allows the person to regain lost control, with the help of a higher power.

Step three is about giving up control of a disease that cannot be controlled and surrendering one’s own self will to a power greater than yourself.

Step four is an important step that includes self examination and soul searching that facilitates the beginning of a clearer, more accurate, worldview.

The remaining 12 Steps focus on using that power that is greater than ourselves. Through various methods, an addicted person can make it through any day without abusing drugs and alcohol with Steps 2 through 12. With the help of one’s higher power, plus a team of trained professionals in a formal treatment program, a group of peers who are going through the process together, and a continued commitment to changing, recovery is beyond possible and it is happening every day.

Recovery Now TV has been working with 12 step recovery programs for over a decade and has successfully introduced thousands of clients to the process that helps achieve a life without drugs and alcohol. By calling Recovery Now TV today at 800-281-4731, you can access more information about 12 Step recovery programs, and can determine which program is right for you, or for someone you love.

Benefits of 12 Step Involvement

The 12 Steps are a concrete way, with proven effectiveness, to stay committed to recovery. If one day is exceptionally hard for a person to stay substance-free, adhering to the current step and attending an Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or a Narcotics Anonymous (NA) meeting is always available.

Drug abuse cost the United States an estimated $161 billion in the year 2000. The individuals who progressed to the point of abuse and addiction, and who created these high costs, were unable to stop using without help. The 12 Steps are a way to stay on a path toward recovery, one step at a time. A study from the research team at UCLA yielded results that individuals who attended a 12 step program on a regular basis were less likely to return to abusing alcohol and drugs.

Disease Model of Addiction

Addiction is a disease of the mind and body that goes beyond the physical abuse of mind-altering substances.

In 1939, William D. Silkworth, M.D. contributed to the Alcoholics Anonymous Big Book, by saying, “All these [alcoholics], and many others, have one symptom in common: they cannot start drinking without developing the phenomenon of craving. This phenomenon, as we have suggested, may be the manifestation of an allergy which differentiates these people and sets them apart as a distinct entity. It has never been, by any treatment with which we are familiar, permanently eradicated. The only relief we have to suggest is entire abstinence.”

Abstinence Based

The idea behind complete abstinence, meaning not using any mind-altering substances, is that the brain and body of someone with the disease of addiction cannot use in moderation. An alcoholic cannot use another psychoactive drug because the craving and desire for an escape or an ability to numb pain, will then become satisfied by prescription drugs, for example, even when alcohol is the drug of choice. The same goes for a heroin addict. The 12 Steps suggest that a heroin addict cannot take a single drink because the effects of alcohol will replace those of heroin, and increase the chance of that user returning to his or her drug of choice.

Unwavering Support System

The 12 Steps are a concrete way, with proven effectiveness, to stay committed to recovery. If one day is exceptionally hard for a person to stay substance-free, adhering to the current step and attending an Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or a Narcotics Anonymous (NA) meeting is always available. When utilized, the 12 Step fellowship provides safety, camaraderie, understanding, and constant support.

A 54-year-old recovering alcoholic shares his story of recovery with the 12 Step Fellowship:

When I went to my first meeting, a 30-year-old beautician was running her story about how her drinking started, the pain she suffered because of it, and what happened to change her. I was a 49-year-old male with my own business, and yet her story was my story. Her reaction to alcohol was the same as mine. Her helplessness after the first drink was mine. Her denial was mine. Her divorce was mine. Her reactions to life’s problems were mine. The familiarity and the sheer power of her running her story have kept me in the group for five and a half years. In AA they say, ‘We only have our stories and all we can do is tell what worked for us to stay sober.’

How You Can Include the 12 Steps in Your Recovery

To become involved in your local 12 Step fellowship, or to enroll in a treatment program that incorporates the 12 Steps, call Recovery Now TV at 800-281-4731. Our team will pair you with the best rehab program for your healing, or the healing of your loved on. Call now!

12-Step Options

A 12 Step fellowship is available for every substance and behavioral addiction. For everyone suffering alone, there is a group of like-minded people meeting to help one another stay substance free and committed to recovery.

Since its inception in the 1930s, 12 Step based programs have become available for every type of dependency. Not only are groups for alcoholics and drug addicts happening in every part of the United States, and of the world, but so are groups for overeaters, for people suffering from an anorexia and bulimia, for people addicted to others people (codependency), and for people addicted to behaviors like sex, gambling, watching pornography, and shopping.

Additionally, groups for those who have been affected by another person’s addiction are prevalent. Al-Anon is for family members of alcoholics and drug addicts, ACA is for Adult Children of Alcoholics, and Alateen is for teenagers with alcohol addicted relatives. Each uses a 12 step process to grieve the past, and to take steps toward one’s own healing.

A Fellowship for Everyone

Each substance and behavior has a separate fellowship, and set of meetings, to allow for greater understanding and support among members. The list below shows the options available to those seeking 12 Step involvement:

  • AA - Alcoholics Anonymous
  • ACA - Adult Children of Alcoholics
  • Al-Anon/Alateen (for friends and families of alcoholics)
  • CA - Cocaine Anonymous
  • CLA - Clutterers Anonymous
  • CMA - Crystal Meth Anonymous
  • Co-Anon (for friends and family of addicts)
  • CoDA - Co-Dependents Anonymous (for people working to end patterns of dysfunctional relationships and develop functional and healthy relationships)
  • COSA - Codependents of Sex Addicts
  • COSLAA - CoSex and Love Addicts Anonymous
  • DA - Debtors Anonymous
  • EA - Emotions Anonymous (for recovery from mental and emotional illness)
  • FA - Families Anonymous, for relatives and friends of addicts
  • FA - Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous
  • FAA - Food Addicts Anonymous
  • GA - Gamblers Anonymous
  • Gam-Anon/Gam-A-Teen (for friends and family members of problem gamblers)
  • HA - Heroin Anonymous
  • MA - Marijuana Anonymous
  • NA - Narcotics Anonymous
  • NAIL - Neurotics Anonymous (for recovery from mental and emotional illness)
  • Nar-Anon, for friends and family members of addicts
  • NicA - Nicotine Anonymous
  • OA - Overeaters Anonymous
  • OLGA - Online Gamers Anonymous
  • PA - Pills Anonymous (for recovery from prescription pill addiction)
  • SA - Sexaholics Anonymous
  • SA - Smokers Anonymous
  • SAA - Sex Addicts Anonymous
  • SCA - Sexual Compulsives Anonymous
  • SIA - Survivors of Incest Anonymous
  • SLAA - Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous
  • UA - Underearners Anonymous
  • WA - Workaholics Anonymous

While there is a fellowship for each substance and behavior, each model branches off from the 12 Steps originally created to treat alcoholics.

Alcoholics Anonymous

AA was established in 1935 and since that time the AA fellowship has helped millions of people around the world get and stay sober. AA has grown tremendously since its creation because the program “works if you work it,” an AA mantra. Along with the serenity prayer, and the 12 Steps themselves, Alcoholics Anonymous’ timeless success is based on its people. The structure of AA, where men and women come together in meetings, allows open sharing of problems, difficulties, vulnerabilities, and the ability to give and receive support. The purpose of personal sharing is to help each participant process his or her life, and to help others see that they are not alone.

For two decades before the American Medical Association identified alcoholism as a disease, Alcoholics Anonymous was treating it as such. By recognizing the progressive deterioration of the mind and body, the growing dependence upon a mind-altering substance, the withdrawal symptoms when alcohol consumption stopped, and the comparability to the criteria for other diseases, AA was one of the first to classify and treat alcoholism as a disease. Subsequently, Alcoholics Anonymous was the first program to bring treatment for alcoholism to the masses so that anyone seeking help could find it.

Decades later, the 12 Step model of Alcoholics Anonymous is consistently used in professional treatment centers. The Big Book is found at every meeting, and can be referenced at any point in recovery for appropriate guidance.

Whatever your situation, understand that recovery is simple, not easy. Recovery Now TV works with treatment centers designed to successfully establish a new life of abstinence from alcohol and drugs, and to help new clients ease into a new life.

Recovery Now TV for Addiction Treatment

Call Recovery Now TV at 800-281-4731 today to break the cycle of addiction once and for all.

Recovery Now TV works with fully-staffed treatment centers who employ medical doctors, psychologists, and certified addiction counselors that treat each client as an individual person with a need for healing of the mind, body or soul.

The first portion of recovery is participation in a detoxification program. With constant medical monitoring and medication management, the pain and discomfort of withdrawal symptoms are alleviated. The goal is to rid the body of all mind-altering chemicals and toxins left from repeated substance abuse.

Following successful detox, a client can enter a formal treatment program aimed at teaching new coping skills. Through individual and group therapy, feelings of inadequacy, necessary isolation, and distrust can be attended to with support and accountability.

Recovery Now TV works toward an ongoing goal of helping each client move through the 12 Steps as completely and authentically as possible to secure a strong foundation of recovery. With years of experience pairing addicts and alcoholics with the proper treatment centers, Recovery Now TV is the best resource for you to utilize for yourself, or for someone you care about who cannot stop abusing drugs and alcohol alone.

Call Recovery Now TV at 800-281-4731 to find out more. Break the cycle of addiction and save a life now!

Sources:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Uppers, Downers, All Arounders by Darryl S. Inaba & William E. Cohen